[Skip to Content]

Search results

You searched for: iep
  • Individualized Education Programs (IEPs): Tips for Teachers for Parents


    IEPs make teachers of students with special needs responsible for planning, implementing, and monitoring educational plans to help the students succeed in school. This article is for educators.

  • Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for Parents


    Some kids may be eligible for individualized education programs in public schools, free of charge. Understanding how to access these services can help you be an effective advocate for your child.

  • IEPs, 504 Plans - Nemours KidsHealth for Educators


    Classroom help for kids with special needs, and more.

  • Special Education: Getting Help for Your Child for Parents


    Kids with special needs may quality for services to help with learning. Here is a guide to getting the help your child needs.

  • 504 Education Plans: Tips for Teachers for Parents


    These plans enable students with special needs to get the accommodations required to access curricula at the same level as their classmates. This article is for educators.

  • 504 Education Plans for Parents


    If your child has special needs in the classroom, he or she may be eligible for a government-supported learning plan.

  • ADHD and School for Parents


    ADHD can affect a child's ability to do well in school and even make friends. This article for parents has tips on working with teachers to help your child succeed.

  • Autism Special Needs Checklist: Big Kids (ages 6-12) for Parents


    Having a plan for the future can help your big kid reach his or her full potential. Follow this 8-step checklist to help your child succeed during the elementary school years.

  • Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Big Kids for Parents


    If you have a school-age child with cerebral palsy, there's a lot to know. This checklist makes it easy to find out what programs and services may be available to you.

  • Balancing Academics and Serious Illness for Parents


    When your child has a serious or chronic illness, it's hard to think beyond the next treatment. But with planning and communication, you can help your child balance treatment and academics.