Blood Test: Comprehensive Metabolic Panelenteenshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/T-testComprehensive-enHD-AR1.gifThis group of blood tests provides doctors with clues about how the body is working. Find out why doctors do these tests and what's involved for teens.cancer, cancer tests, tests for cancer, blood tests for cancer, cancer medicine, medicine side effects, cancer medication, medication side effects, glucose, sugar, calcium, electrolyte, electrolytes, sodium, potassium, carbon dioxide, chloride, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, alanine amino transferase, aspartate amino transferase, blood draw, sample, vein, needle, needle phobia, fear of needles, fear of blood01/21/200903/18/201909/02/2019292fc821-ecb3-4f42-b473-b816e23480cehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-cmp.html/<h3>What Is a Blood Test?</h3> <p>A <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/video-bldtest.html/">blood test</a> is when a sample of blood is taken from the body to be tested in a lab. Doctors order blood tests to check things such as the levels of glucose, hemoglobin, or white blood cells. This can help them detect problems like a disease or medical condition. Sometimes, blood tests can help them see how well an organ (such as the liver or kidneys) is working.</p> <h3>What Is a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)?</h3> <p>The comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) is a blood test that gives doctors information about the body's fluid balance, levels of electrolytes like sodium and potassium, and how well the kidneys and liver are working.</p> <h3>Why Are Comprehensive Metabolic Panels Done?</h3> <p>A CMP is done to learn information about the levels of:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/glucose.html/"><strong>Glucose</strong></a>, a type of sugar used by the body for energy. High glucose levels may point to diabetes.</li> <li><strong>Electrolytes:</strong> <ul> <li><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/calcium.html/"><strong>Calcium</strong></a>, which plays an important role in how muscles and nerves work.</li> <li><strong>Sodium, potassium</strong>, <strong>carbon dioxide</strong>, and <strong>chloride</strong>, which help control the body's fluid levels and its acid-base balance. Normal levels of these electrolytes help keep cells in the body working as they should.</li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Blood urea nitrogen (BUN)</strong> and <strong>creatinine</strong>, which are waste products filtered out of the blood by the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidneys.html/">kidneys</a>. These levels show how well the kidneys are working.</li> <li><strong>Albumin&nbsp;</strong>and<strong>&nbsp;total protein</strong>, which are needed to build and maintain muscles, bones, blood, and organ tissue. Low levels may be seen with liver or kidney disease, or nutritional problems.</li> <li><strong>Liver tests</strong>: Alkaline phosphatase (ALP),&nbsp;alanine aminotransferase (ALT),&nbsp;aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and&nbsp;bilirubin. When these levels are high, it can be a sign of a problem with the liver.</li> </ul> <h3>How Should I Prepare for a CMP?</h3> <p>You may be asked to stop eating and drinking for 8 to 12 hours before a CMP. Tell your doctor about any medicines you take because some drugs might affect the test results. Wearing a T-shirt or short-sleeved shirt can make things easier for you on the day of the test.</p> <h3>How Is a CMP Done?</h3> <p>Most blood tests take a small amount of blood from a vein. To do that, a health professional will:</p> <ul> <li>clean the skin</li> <li>put an elastic band (tourniquet) above the area to get the veins to swell with blood</li> <li>insert a needle into a vein (usually in the arm inside of the elbow or on the back of the hand)</li> <li>pull the blood sample into a vial or syringe</li> <li>take off the elastic band and remove the needle from the vein</li> </ul> <p>Collecting a sample of blood is only temporarily uncomfortable and can feel like a quick pinprick.</p> <p><img class="left" title="drawing_blood" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/bloodTest-400x760-rd1-enIL.gif" alt="drawing_blood" name="974-031609_BLOODTEST_RD7.GIF" /></p> <h3>Can a Parent Stay With Me During a CMP?</h3> <p>Parents usually can stay with their child during a blood test. Try to relax and stay still because tensing muscles can make it harder to draw blood. You might want to look away when the needle is inserted and the blood is collected. Try taking slow deep breaths or singing a favorite song to help you relax.</p> <h3>How Long Does a CMP Take?</h3> <p>Most blood tests take just a few minutes. Occasionally, it can be hard to find a vein so the health professional may need to try more than once.</p> <h3>What Happens After a CMP?</h3> <p>The health professional will remove the elastic band and the needle and cover the area with cotton or a bandage to stop the bleeding. Afterward, there may be some mild bruising, which should go away in a few days.</p> <h3>When Are CMP Results Ready?</h3> <p>Blood samples are processed by a machine, and it may take a few hours to a day for the results to be available. If the test results show signs of a problem, the doctor might order other tests to figure out what the problem is and how to treat it.</p> <h3>Are There Any Risks From CMPs?</h3> <p>A comprehensive metabolic panel is a safe procedure with minimal risks. Some teens might feel faint or lightheaded from the test, and a few have a strong fear of needles. If you're anxious, talk with the doctor before the test about ways to make the procedure easier.</p> <p>A small bruise or mild soreness around the blood test site is common and can last for a few days. Call your doctor if the discomfort gets worse or lasts longer.&nbsp;</p> <p>If you have questions about the CMP, speak with your doctor or the health professional doing the blood draw.</p>Análisis de sangre: panel metabólico ampliadoEl panel metabólico ampliado es un análisis de sangre que proporciona información a los médicos sobre el equilibrio de líquidos en el cuerpo y lo bien que están funcionando los riñones y el hígado.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/teens/test-cmp-esp.html/f0dc4b87-3bd5-4d0b-992b-1e9806c9f1a0
Blood Test (Video)These videos show what's involved in getting a blood test and what it's like to be the person taking the blood sample.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/video-bldtest.html/267eef2d-8579-44db-adcb-641db49d0ec0
Blood Test: Basic Metabolic PanelA basic metabolic panel (BMP) is a group of blood tests that provide doctors with clues about how the body is working. Find out why doctors do this and what's involved for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-bmp.html/acc56baa-4973-4ec4-a72f-c21527648d02
Blood Test: Complete Blood CountThis common blood test helps doctors gather information about a person's blood cells and how they're working. Find out why doctors do this test and what's involved for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-cbc.html/6843c50f-dc8a-4b78-8fc7-50f34942c2d7
Blood Test: Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR)This test measures the speed at which red blood cells fall to the bottom of an upright glass test tube. Find out why doctors do it and what's involved for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-esr.html/0f5d92ed-ac26-4835-b422-2acdf3a22628
Blood Test: Liver Function TestsIf your liver isn't working properly, it can affect your overall health. Find out why doctors do liver function tests and what's involved for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-liver-function.html/12488ec3-75a0-4ee2-b2b7-ff34407345d0
Blood Test: MagnesiumA magnesium test looks at levels of the mineral magnesium in a person's blood. Find out why doctors do this test and what's involved for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-magnesium.html/ab10742c-819c-400b-98d8-e7a042cfebf5
Blood Test: PhosphorusA phosphorus test looks at levels of phosphorus in a person's blood. Find out why doctors do this test and what's involved for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-phosphorus.html/10009d64-eaa4-485a-afd7-6349e0953e24
Cancer CenterVisit our Cancer Center for teens to get information and advice on treating and coping with cancer.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/center/cancer-center.html/0e8f49f1-135b-4839-9b31-56a9f5193b13
Kidneys and Urinary TractThe kidneys perform several functions that are essential to health, the most important of which are to filter blood and produce urine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidneys.html/d0d97a22-7118-4082-acae-02dd5319be95
Medical Tests: What to Expect (Video)Need to get a blood test? An MRI? These videos show what happens in 10 of the most common medical tests.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/med-videos-landing.html/572b2b64-25e9-47e9-acea-355249866702
kh:age-teenThirteenToNineteenkh:age-youngAdultEighteenPluskh:clinicalDesignation-pathologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-pathologyMedications & Treatmentshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/managing-care-center/meds-treatments/5884c854-3da1-4f0e-bad6-834c4bb10744Diagnostic Tests for Teens With Cancerhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/cancer-center/diagnostic-tests/73ccad36-c7a6-4e40-b98e-f21fba10718chttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/bloodTest-400x760-rd1-enIL.gif