Starting High Schoolenteenshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/T-startHighSchool-enHD-AR1.jpgThe transition from middle school to high school is an important one. Here are a few topics that commonly worry incoming freshmen and some things you might want to know about them.what's it like in high school, what to expect in high school, moving to high school, going to high school, beginning high school, freshmen, incoming freshman, ninth grade, starting 9th grade, 9th grade, nervous about high school, worried about high school, what's it like in high school, homework, school counselor, starting high school, high school, high school worries, worries about high school, freshman, high school freshman, work load, homework, extracurriculars, extra curricular activities, teachers, new school06/29/200507/31/201907/31/2019Kathryn Hoffses, PhD08/22/201819e89821-5d57-4420-b5ba-4399795cf933https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/starting-high-school.html/<p>So what's high school really like? Is there more work? More stress? Will it be difficult going from being one of the oldest middle school students to one of the youngest high schoolers?</p> <p>If you're having thoughts like these, you're not alone: Lots of other freshmen are feeling the same way you are &mdash; you're all starting out in a new place. With that in mind, here are a few topics that commonly worry incoming freshmen and some things you might want to know about them.</p> <h3>Starting Out at a New School</h3> <p>You may not know a lot of people when you start high school. Maybe your friends from middle school are going to a different high school. Even if you know other freshmen, you might feel nervous that you don't know any upperclassmen. How are you going to make friends among this sea of unknown faces?</p> <p>Most high schools hold a freshman orientation before school actually starts. These are helpful not only because you learn your way around the building and get to meet some of your teachers, but you also get to meet fellow freshmen. That way, when you show up on your first day of school, you may already recognize a few familiar faces. If you think it might help, tour your school another time before or after orientation to make sure you have a good sense for where your classes, locker, etc., are.&nbsp;</p> <p>When you talk to people at orientation, you'll probably find that a lot of them are feeling just like you are. They're all new to the school and don't know what to expect. Talking about a common concern with your classmates can spark new friendships.</p> <h3>Learning Inside the Classroom</h3> <p>How about the workload in high school &mdash; is it a lot harder? Again, this is something your classmates are probably worried about, too.</p> <p>The work in high school builds on what you learned in middle school, giving you a more advanced knowledge of many academic subjects. So you may find you have more work to do or that it's a bit more challenging. But these challenges can make you feel less bored with the usual routine &mdash; it feels great when you've mastered something really tough. Maybe you'll find a new appreciation for biology or discover a passion for literature.</p> <p>If you ever find your work too overwhelming, teachers and tutors are available for extra help. While you have more independence as a high school student than you might have had in middle school, there are still many resources to fall back on if you feel the work is too much or if there's something you don't understand.</p> <h3>Extracurricular Activities</h3> <p>High school also has more extracurriculars than middle school did, such as clubs, music and theater groups, student government, and sports teams. This is a fantastic time to explore your interests and try new things. Who said school has to be all work and no play?</p> <p>These activities may take place before or after school, or during free periods or study halls. Because of this, it helps to sharpen your time management skills in your first year. Extracurricular activities are great, but remember to leave free time for yourself. Everybody needs some downtime.</p> <h3>Learning Outside the Classroom</h3> <p>High school is a time of increasing independence and responsibility. As in middle school, you or your friends may have some tough times. But if you ever find that personal issues get really overwhelming, find someone to talk to. Just because you're becoming more independent does not mean you're alone.</p> <p>Friends and parents can be great resources, but sometimes that's not enough. School counselors or therapists can be very helpful if you want to talk with someone outside of your friends and family. So many people are available to help you.</p> <p>Middle school taught you the basics of academics, time management, and social skills while providing you with a little extra support and guidance &mdash; kind of like a bicycle with training wheels. High school gives you the chance to take off those training wheels and learn how to be more independent.</p> <p>It's perfectly OK if you're nervous at first. Even if you don't get off to the best start, that's normal, too &mdash; everybody's a bit wobbly the first time they take off their training wheels. Just be patient and keep trying. Once you've adjusted to your new independence, you may find you can go farther than you ever imagined.</p>Empezar la educación secundaria o preparatoriaMultitud de novatos se sienten igual que tú. Teniendo esto en cuanta, he aquí algunas cuestiones que suelen preocupar a lo novatos que van a entrar en un centro de enseñanza secundaria superior y algunas cosas que tal vez te interesaría saber.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/teens/starting-high-school-esp.html/13d62973-a59f-4b67-9381-3704c89a2407
5 Ways to Beat Pre-performance NervesStressed out about speaking or performing in front of people? These tips can help you cope.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/nerves.html/c5686208-9798-4deb-8406-f47a043927b4
Back to SchoolDread it or love it, you gotta go to school. Looking for ways to make the first day a little less painful? Here are some tips.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/back-to-school.html/2f27f816-0b81-491f-97f4-ccab0917a47c
Coping With CliquesAre you on the outside looking in or the inside wanting out? Find out how to deal with cliques in this article for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/cliques.html/40365172-b61f-485e-a860-1a3d0592dcc6
HomeschoolingHomeschooled students can learn just as much as they would in regular school. Get the facts on home schooling here.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/homeschooled.html/a5c60ce2-d589-44b9-9110-2929d565a890
Homework HelpWriting a report? Studying for a test? Having problems at school? Get tips and advice.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/center/homework-help.html/f664ea8a-b0c3-45e4-a72a-e4faf6ede397
How Much Sleep Do I Need?Teens need about 8 to 10 hours of sleep each night. But you might not be getting it. Here's why - and tips for getting more shut-eye.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/how-much-sleep.html/861031c2-d9db-4cb9-81e6-93f5bf9c7e1f
How to Make Homework Less WorkHaving trouble getting a handle on all of your homework? Get your work space set, your schedule organized, and your studying done with the help of this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/homework.html/b5e77467-51d8-4b71-94e0-f1e40d3d25fc
School CounselorsSchool counselors can give you all sorts of tips and support on solving problems and making good decisions. But how do you meet with a counselor and what is it like? Find out here.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/school-counselors.html/5bda8647-47da-4249-bd91-9123ca104336
Talking to Your Parents - or Other AdultsWhether it's an everyday issue like schoolwork or an emergency situation, these tips can help you improve communications with your parents and other adults.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/talk-to-parents.html/d757b601-875c-48b4-97ad-b48cd17d6bf9
What Stresses You Out About School?Find out what our readers said about how they handle back-to-school worries.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/school-stress.html/16cecaa0-475c-4d02-b7b9-9570c5805f7e
kh:age-teenThirteenToNineteenkh:clinicalDesignation-behavioralHealthkh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-behavioralHealthBack to School Timehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/homework/back/d0f9fa95-f311-447f-a84f-11ba92b76031School Stuffhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/school-jobs/school/f4ec6871-9ba8-49c9-8100-f55331d4a672Stressful Situationshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/stress-coping-center/stress-situations/ba842abe-1d5d-4bf9-a8ad-22470baa39f4