Depressionenteenshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/T-depression-enHD-AR1.jpgDepression is very common. For more information about depression and feeling better, check out this article.depression, depressed, depres, depresion, depress, depresed, dipressed, dipresd, teens and depression, how depression affects teens, major depression, cutting, bipolar, manic depressive, manic-depressive, manic depression, body image, self-esteem, self esteem, suicide, killing myself, kill myself, i want to kill myself, i feel bad about myself, death, want to die, seratonin, substance abuse, mania, bipolar disorder, depressed mood, sleep, sadness, therapy, therapist, medication, talk therapy, sad, worried, worry, crying, cry, anxiety, anxious, falling apart, upset, anger, angry, can't sleep, nervous, stressed, stress, scared, afraid, crazy, going crazy, nuts, calm, emotional, emotions, emo, tearful, i feel like i'm going crazy, i'm always sad, tired, sleepy, i'm emotional10/07/200309/27/201809/02/2019D'Arcy Lyness, PhD08/14/2016313901c9-c72a-4f03-831b-94ab61da2856https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/depression.html/<h3>Regular Sadness vs. Depression</h3> <p style="font-size: 12px;">It's natural to feel sad, down, or discouraged at times. We all feel these human emotions, they're reactions to the hassles and hurdles of life.</p> <p style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="line-height: 16.8px;">We may feel sad over an argument with a friend, a breakup, or a best friend moving out of town. We might be disappointed about doing poorly on a test or discouraged if our team can't break its losing streak. The death of someone close can lead to a specific kind of sadness &mdash; grief.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">Most of the time, people manage to deal with these feelings and get past them with a little time and care.</span></p> <p>Depression is more than occasionally feeling blue, sad, or down in the dumps, though. <strong>Depression is a strong mood involving sadness, discouragement, despair, or hopelessness that lasts for weeks, months, or even longer.</strong></p> <p><strong><img class="left" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/depressionAskForSupport_a_enIL.png" alt="This picture shows a teen talking to his mom with the caption, &quot;Ask your mom or dad for support.&quot;" /></strong></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em;">Depression affects more than a person's mood. It affects thinking, too. It interferes with the ability to notice or enjoy the good things in life. Depression drains the energy, motivation, and concentration a person needs for normal activities.&nbsp;</span></p> <h3>Signs of Depression</h3> <p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/depression.html/?view=rr" style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;"><img class="right" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/whoCanHelp_enBT.gif" alt="Who Can Help" /></a></p> <p>Here are some of the things people notice with depression:</p> <ul> <li><strong><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">Negative feelings and mood.</span></strong><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;"> People with depression might feel unusually sad, discouraged, or defeated. They may feel hopeless, helpless, or alone. Some people feel guilty, unworthy, rejected, or unloved. Some people with depression feel, angry, easily annoyed, bitter, or alienated.&nbsp;<br /><br /></span><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">Any or all of these negative emotions can be part of a depressed mood if they go on for weeks or more.</span></li> <li> <p><strong>Negative thinking.</strong> People with depression get stuck in negative thinking. This can make people focus on problems and faults. It can make things seem bleaker than they really are. Negative thinking can make a person believe things will never get better, that problems are too big to solve, that nothing can fix the situation, or that nothing matters.&nbsp;<br /><br />Negative thinking can be self-critical, too. People may believe they are worthless and unlovable &mdash;&nbsp;even though that's not true. That can lead people with depression to think about harming themselves or about ending their own life. Negative thinking can block our ability to see solutions&nbsp;or realize that a problem is actually temporary.</p> </li> <li><strong>Low energy and motivation.</strong> People with depression may feel tired, drained, or exhausted. They might move more slowly or take longer to do things. It can feel as if everything requires more effort. People who feel this way might have trouble motivating themselves to do or care about anything.</li> <li> <p><strong>Poor concentration.</strong> Depression can make it hard to concentrate and focus. It might be hard to do schoolwork, pay attention in class, remember lessons, or stay focused on what others say.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Physical problems. </strong>Some people with depression have an upset stomach or loss of appetite. Some might gain or lose weight. People might notice headaches and sleeping problems when they're depressed.</p> </li> <li><strong>Social withdrawing. </strong>People with depression may pull away from friends and family or from activities they once enjoyed. This usually makes them feel more lonely and isolated&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 16.8px;">&mdash; and</span>&nbsp;can make negative thinking worse.</li> </ul> <h3>Depression Can Go Unrecognized</h3> <p><strong>People with depression may not realize they are depressed.</strong> Because self-critical thinking is part of depression, some people might mistakenly think of themselves as a failure, a bad student, a quitter, a slacker, a loser, or a bad person.</p> <p><strong>Because depression can affect how a person acts, it might be misunderstood as a bad attitude.</strong> Other people may think the person isn't trying or not putting in any effort. For example, a negative or irritable mood can cause someone to act more argumentative, disagreeable, or angry. That can make the person seem difficult to get along with or cause others to keep their distance. Low motivation, low energy, difficulty concentrating, and thoughts of "why bother?" can lead someone to skip classes or school.</p> <p><strong>Some people with depression have other problems as well.</strong> These can intensify feelings of worthlessness or inner pain. For example, people who <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/cutting.html/">cut themselves</a> or who have <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/eat-disorder.html/">eating disorders</a> or who go through extreme mood changes may have unrecognized depression.</p> <p>When depression is recognized and treated, it often clears the way for other problems to get treated, too.</p> <h3>What Helps Depression Get Better?</h3> <p>Depression can get better with the right attention and care &mdash; sometimes more easily than a person thinks.&nbsp;<strong style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">But if it's not treated, things can stay bad or get worse.</strong><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;"> That's why people who are depressed shouldn't wait and hope it will go away on its own.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">If you think you might be depressed, talk to a parent or other adult about getting the right help.</span><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">&nbsp;The right help can mean doing all of these things:</span></p> <h4>Get a Medical Checkup</h4> <p>A doctor can check for any health conditions that might cause symptoms of depression. For example, <a class="kh_anchor">hypothyroidism</a> can cause a depressed mood, low energy, and&nbsp;tiredness. <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/mononucleosis.html/">Mono</a> can make a person feel tired and depressed.</p> <h4><span style="font-size: 1em; font-weight: bold; line-height: normal;">Talk to a Counselor</span></h4> <p>Having meetings with a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/therapist.html/">counselor or therapist</a> is called talk therapy. Talk therapy can help people overcome depression. Talk therapy works by helping people to:</p> <ul> <li>understand their emotions, put feelings into words, and feel understood and supported</li> <li>build the confidence to deal with life's struggles&nbsp;</li> <li>work out problems they face</li> <li>change negative thinking patterns that are part of depression</li> <li>increase self-esteem and become more self-accepting</li> <li>increase their positive emotions and feel happier</li> </ul> <p>Overcoming depression might include talk therapy, medication, or both. A therapist might also recommend daily exercise, exposure to daylight, or better ways of eating. A therapist might teach relaxation skills to help someone get a good night's sleep. &nbsp;</p> <h4>Get Support</h4> <p>Many people find that it helps to <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/talk-depression.html/">open up to parents</a> or other adults they trust. Simply saying something like, "I've been feeling really down lately and I think I'm depressed" can be a good way to begin the discussion.</p> <p>If a parent or family member can't help, turn to your school counselor, school nurse, or a helpline.</p> <p>Let friends and other people who care about you offer their support. They can:</p> <ul> <li>listen and talk, showing that they understand what you're feeling</li> <li>remind you that things can get better, and that they are there for you through the downs and ups</li> <li>help you see the things that are already good about your life, even when it's hard for you to notice</li> <li>keep you company and do enjoyable or relaxing things with you</li> <li>give you honest compliments and help you find things to laugh or smile about</li> </ul> <h3>Help Yourself</h3> <p>Try these simple actions. They can have a powerful effect on mood and help with depression:</p> <ul> <li>eat healthy foods</li> <li>get the right amount of sleep</li> <li>walk, play, or do something else to get exercise every day</li> <li>take time to relax</li> <li>take time to notice the good things about life, no matter how small</li> </ul> <p>Focusing on positive emotions and being with positive people can help, too. Do yoga, dance, and find creative self-expression through art, music,&nbsp;or journaling. Daily exercise, meditation, daylight, and positive emotions all can affect the brain's activity in ways that restore mood and well-being.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">Depression can be treated if you take the right steps:</span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">Do what you can to care for yourself.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">See a doctor or counselor.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">Don't&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">wait for depression to just go away.</span></li> </ul>DepresiónLa depresión es más que sentirse triste, decaído, bajo o con los ánimos por los suelos de forma ocasional. La depresión es un estado de ánimo intenso que implica tristeza, desesperación o desesperanza y que dura semanas, meses o incluso más tiempo.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/teens/depression-esp.html/acd90f2e-7aea-4bca-9178-c9aa353f9b22
5 Ways to Help Yourself Through DepressionIt's important to take action against depression - it doesn't just go away on its own. In addition to getting professional help, here are 5 ways to feel better.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/depression-tips.html/55fdf5eb-0627-463c-94e2-a43d7822d692
Bipolar DisorderBipolar disorders are one of several medical conditions called depressive disorders that affect the way a person's brain functions. Find out more about bipolar disorder.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/bipolar.html/4a2e14e8-c372-47a8-bb43-25d7dd9ff2a1
CuttingIt can be hard to understand, but people who cut themselves sometimes do it because it actually makes them feel better. They are overflowing with emotions - like sadness, depression, or anger - that they have trouble expressing.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/cutting.html/33dde8f5-8c32-469a-a30f-fa40ca15efc6
Finding Low-Cost Mental Health CareIf you need mental health care but don't think you can afford it, you're not alone. Get tips on finding low-cost or free mental health care in this article for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/mhealth-care.html/1d8bc05d-7696-4dda-910b-0d06f3855508
Going to a TherapistGetting help with emotions or stress is the same as getting help with a medical problem like asthma or diabetes. This article explains how therapy works and how it can help with problems.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/therapist.html/86e1241b-e507-44a8-8328-8f4ba7b631af
My Friend Is Talking About Suicide. What Should I Do?Have you heard that people who talk about suicide won't go through with it? That's not true. Read this article to learn some of the other warning signs that a person is considering suicide.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/talking-about-suicide.html/f8fcae3e-357d-4bb8-871e-f3c197bbae11
Posttraumatic Stress DisorderSometimes after experiencing a traumatic event, a person has a strong and lingering reaction known as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Getting treatment and support can make all the difference.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/ptsd.html/713e332a-8629-4b08-a45b-0a5bc0501ec1
Seasonal Affective DisorderSeasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a form of depression that affects some people and appears at the same time each year.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/sad.html/f0ec366a-8c3f-4ea3-9a99-fdac5f060951
Stress & Coping CenterVisit our stress and coping center for advice on how to handle stress, including different stressful situations.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/center/stress-center.html/31890be1-2161-48bf-9246-74d3be74d3b3
SuicideWe all feel overwhelmed by difficult emotions or situations sometimes. Here are the warning signs of suicide and ways to get help.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/suicide.html/0a05aa15-ecc1-4f57-a687-e486849ab43c
Talking to Parents About DepressionIf you feel depressed, you need to reach out for help and support. Read our tips for teens on talking to parents about depression.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/talk-depression.html/e9b2e976-c37c-4c41-82c4-90e6bffaf1ad
When Depression Is SevereSevere depression can cloud a person's thinking and lead some people to think that life isn't worth living. But severe depression can be treated. Find out what to do and how to get help in this article for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/severe-depression.html/f8a6f7b0-feaf-499d-b2a1-ebdb48a21c3d
Why Do People Get Depressed?There's no one reason why people get depressed - many different things can play a role. Find out more about the things that can trigger depression.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/why-depressed.html/d1e33cf3-a49d-4f8e-863b-f9423ee608d5
kh:age-teenThirteenToNineteenkh:age-youngAdultEighteenPluskh:clinicalDesignation-behavioralHealthkh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-behavioralHealthDealing With Feelings About Cancer (for Teens)https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/cancer-center/feelings/4d95ce61-2172-430a-8af1-b72e6784071bWhen Stress Is Serioushttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/stress-coping-center/serious-stress/06532846-655b-41af-875b-193b1b54e69bHandle Negative Emotionshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/best-self-center/handle-negative/d40d00d1-38bf-4db4-a354-6871536ddb79Health Problems of Being Overweighthttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/managing-weight-center/health-problems/1f3842e7-fe61-4118-9005-24f69e51f565Feeling Sadhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/your-mind/feeling-sad/1af91770-d414-425e-9bb0-88cb92d114d2Mental Healthhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/your-mind/mental-health/134e1f49-4b13-460b-832d-a0b04e611574https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/depressionAskForSupport_a_enIL.pnghttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/whoCanHelp_enBT.gif