Definition: Long-Term Control Medicineenteenshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/T-dictionary-enHD-AR2.gifMany people with asthma need to take medication every day to control their asthma.Definition: Long-Term Control Medicine10/11/200408/11/201608/11/2016c94dc73d-e807-40cc-bba0-1fdf5f1c45c7https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/controller.html/<h3>Long-Term Control Medicine</h3> <p>There's a&nbsp;reason for this medicine's name: If your doctor prescribed it for your asthma, you&nbsp;need to take it every day, over a long period of time,&nbsp;to control the condition. Long-term control medicines are sometimes also&nbsp;called <strong>controller</strong> or <strong>maintenance</strong> medicines.</p> <p>Long-term control&nbsp;medicine works slowly over time to keep the airways in the lungs open and clear.&nbsp;It may take days or weeks for long-term control medicine&nbsp;to start working and keep the airways from becoming swollen and narrow. That's why people need to take it each day, even when they feel OK.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Medicamentos de controlLos medicamentos de control mantienen las vías aéreas de los pulmones abiertas y despejadas, lo cual facilita la respiración.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/teens/controller-esp.html/40da08f4-3a6b-4cf4-b7ce-2237056d56bckh:age-teenThirteenToNineteenkh:age-youngAdultEighteenPluskh:clinicalDesignation-allergykh:clinicalDesignation-pulmonologykh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-pulmonologyWords to Know for Teens With Asthmahttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/asthma-center/words-to-know/af80913e-f47b-46fe-99dc-387482ea53e9