Can I Have a Vaginal Birth If I Had a Previous C-Section?enparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-QA-enHD-AR1.gifFind out what the experts have to say.c-section, vbac, vaginal birth, birth of second child, second delivery, vaginal birth after c-section06/06/200609/26/201609/26/2016Elana Pearl Ben-Joseph, MD05/14/20155bdbc3a8-fdf8-4ed6-8ca4-ef8d89c7e0cahttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/vbac.html/<p><em>I had a C-section with my first child. Now that I'm pregnant with my second, I'd really like to try to have a vaginal delivery. But is that safe</em> &mdash; <em>for me and my baby?<br /> </em>&ndash; <em>Danae</em></p> <p>Many women who have had a cesarean section (or C-section) with their first pregnancy are interested in a vaginal delivery for their second or later births. For years, women who'd had a C-section were encouraged to skip vaginal deliveries altogether and schedule C-sections for all future births.</p> <p>But these days, a vaginal birth after cesarean (or VBAC) is considered a safe option for many women and their babies. And, with a vaginal delivery, you can come home sooner and recover quicker.</p> <p>The reason for your first C-section, the type of incision made on your uterus, and other factors in your medical history will determine whether or not you can have a VBAC:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>A <strong>transverse incision</strong> (also known as a horizontal incision) cuts across the lower, thinner part of the uterus. It is used during most C-sections and makes a VBAC much more likely.</li> <li>A <strong>vertical incision</strong> cuts up and down through the uterine muscles that strongly contract during labor, and is riskier for a VBAC because it might cause uterine rupture (a tear in the uterine muscle).</li> </ul> <p>The incision on your skin does not necessarily go in the same direction as the incision on your uterus. Also, if you've had more than one C-section, a VBAC might not be an option.</p> <p>Of course, not all women who try to have a VBAC succeed. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) estimates that about 60% to 80% of women who try to have a VBAC succeed.</p> <p>Although a VBAC does come with risks, many women are able to have one with no complications at all. If you're interested in having a VBAC, talk to your doctor to weigh the risks and benefits. And check with your hospital well in advance to make sure they'll allow it &mdash; if they don't and you have your heart set on a vaginal birth, you may need to change hospitals.</p>
Birth PlansThe reality of labor and birth may seem extremely far off - but now's the time to start planning for your baby by creating a birth plan that details your wishes.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/birth-plans.html/067405ca-56aa-409f-af00-da299027dcce
Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity ServicesWhere you choose to give birth is an important decision. Is a hospital or a birth center right for you? Knowing the facts can help you make your decision.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/birth-centers-hospitals.html/85ac13f2-2f5a-4538-92c2-d58d2ed01770
Can I Request to Have a C-Section?Find out what the experts have to say.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cesarean.html/aab9692e-698d-434e-bdbe-9903bc27d933
Cesarean Sections (C-Sections)Many babies are delivered via cesarean sections. Learn why and how C-sections are done.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/c-sections.html/3441f01d-4085-4fe3-ba1d-781e0953de92
EpiduralsEpidurals can make giving birth more calm, controlled, and comfortable. Find out more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/epidurals.html/cee15cbb-a39a-4efb-a0ea-4eb125b9a276
Natural ChildbirthSome women choose to give birth using no medications at all, relying instead on relaxation techniques and controlled breathing for pain. Get more information on natural childbirth.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/natural-childbirth.html/1760c6cb-c9e5-492d-a393-9c8e109033ef
Pregnancy & Newborn CenterAdvice and information for expectant and new parents.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/pregnancy-center.html/c58d014a-89a3-4c90-8b54-c9cadf5d6016
Recovering From DeliveryAfter giving birth, you'll notice you've changed somewhat - both physically and emotionally. Here's what to expect after labor and delivery.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/recovering-delivery.html/dcd08107-34bc-49b7-9997-1ab35a939bf6
kh:age-NAkh:clinicalDesignation-obgynkh:genre-qAndAkh:primaryClinicalDesignation-obgynPregnancy & Infants Q&Ahttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/question/infants/1f888b1d-d0e9-48bd-b6e9-ab3bed0a9eb7Healthy Pregnancy Q&Ahttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/preventing-premature-birth/q-and-as/1546921e-5df3-4da7-a1d0-3ae8042cf2dd