Tricuspid Atresiaenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/Cardiology_Tricuspid_Atresia_enHD_2.jpgTricuspid atresia is a congenital heart defect. A baby born with tricuspid atresia often has serious symptoms soon after birth because blood flow to the lungs is much less than normal.heart, heart defect, cardio, cardiology, cardiologist, tricuspid atresia, congenital heart defect, heart problems in babies, Cardiac catheterization, Fontan procedure, Blalock-Taussig, shunt, stent, pulse ox, prostaglandin, ductus arteriosus, tricuspid valve, echocardiogram, 02/15/201809/19/201809/02/2019Michael A. Bingler, MD02/13/2018ac5a0383-98fb-469d-a867-1e8af8af6528https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/tricuspid-atresia.html/<h3>What Is Tricuspid Atresia?</h3> <p>Tricuspid atresia is a <a class="kh_anchor">congenital heart defect</a> (this means that a baby who has it is born with it). It happens when the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/heart.html/">heart</a>'s tricuspid valve does not develop. This means that blood can't flow from the heart's <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary-right-atrium.html/">right atrium</a> (upper receiving chamber) to the <a class="kh_anchor">right ventricle</a> (lower pumping chamber) as it should.</p> <p>A baby born with tricuspid atresia often has serious symptoms soon after birth because blood flow to the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/lungs.html/">lungs</a> is much less than normal.</p> <h3>What Happens In Tricuspid Atresia?</h3> <p>In a normal heart, the tricuspid valve lets blood flow from the right atrium into the right ventricle. When the right ventricle squeezes to pump blood to the lungs, the tricuspid valve closes. This keeps blood from flowing back into the right atrium.<img class="right" title="" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/tricuspidAtresiaEstab_433x259_enIL.png" alt="healthy heart illustration" /></p> <p>The right side of the heart (the right atrium and the right ventricle) gets oxygen-poor blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs. Then, the lungs add fresh oxygen to the blood. The blood, now full of oxygen, returns to the left side of the heart. The left atrium gets the oxygen-rich blood and passes it to the left ventricle, which then pumps it out to the body.</p> <p>In a heart with tricuspid atresia, solid tissue sits between the right atrium and the right ventricle. Because blood in the right atrium can't move through the tricuspid valve, the wall separating the right and left sides of the heart does not form completely.</p> <p>In most babies with tricuspid atresia, the heart has two holes:&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <ol> <li>an <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/asd.html/">atrial septal defect (ASD)</a>, which is a hole between the right atrium and the left atrium</li> <li>a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/vsd.html/">ventricular septal defect (VSD)</a>, which is a hole between the right ventricle and left ventricle</li> </ol> <p>Oxygen-poor blood received by the right atrium can only flow by the atrial septal defect (ASD). The oxygen-poor blood passes through the ASD into the left atrium, where it mixes with oxygen-rich blood. The left atrium passes the mixed blood to the left ventricle. The left ventricle pumps most of the mixed blood to the body, but some pushes through the ventricular septal defect (VSD) and the right ventricle to the lungs.<img class="right" title="" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/tricuspidAtresia_433x259_enIL.png" alt="tricuspid atresia illustration" /></p> <h3>What Are the Signs &amp; Symptoms of Tricuspid Atresia?</h3> <p>Soon after birth, a newborn with tricuspid atresia usually will:</p> <ul> <li>have bluish skin (cyanosis)</li> <li>breathe fast</li> <li>have problems feeding</li> <li>get tired quickly when feeding</li> <li>be less active than most babies</li> </ul> <h3>What Causes Tricuspid Atresia?</h3> <p>Tricuspid atresia happens when the heart forms very early in pregnancy. No one knows why the the valve doesn't grow normally.</p> <h3>Who Gets Tricuspid Atresia?</h3> <p>A baby is more likely to have tricuspid atresia if:</p> <ul> <li>the baby has <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/down-syndrome.html/">Down syndrome</a> (trisomy 21)&nbsp;</li> <li>either parent has a <a class="kh_anchor">congenital heart defect</a></li> <li>the mother had a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/german-measles.html/">rubella</a> (German measles) infection or other viral infection during pregnancy</li> <li>the mother has poorly controlled diabetes or <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/lupus.html/">lupus</a> (an autoimmune disease)</li> <li>the mother uses certain anti-acne or anti-seizure medicines during pregnancy</li> </ul> <p>But, having one or more risk factors doesn't mean that a baby will have tricuspid atresia. Tricuspid atresia can happen without any risk factors.</p> <h3>How Is Tricuspid Atresia Diagnosed?</h3> <p>Tricuspid atresia sometimes is seen on <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/prenatal-ultrasound.html/">ultrasound</a> scans before birth. A <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/fetal-echocardiogram.html/">fetal echocardiogram</a> (a more detailed ultrasound study of the unborn baby's heart) can give more information and help the delivery team plan treatment.</p> <p>A screening <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/pulse-oximetry.html/"><strong>pulse oximeter test</strong></a> usually is done on all newborns right after birth using a light on a fingertip or toe. If tricuspid atresia isn't found before birth, this test will show that the baby's blood is not carrying as much oxygen as expected. The delivery team will then do other tests to find the problem and help plan treatment.</p> <p>The tests may include:</p> <ul> <li>pulse oximeter monitoring</li> <li>a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/xray-exam-chest.html/">chest X-ray</a></li> <li><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ekg.html/">electrocardiogram</a> (also called ECG or EKG, a recording of the heart's electrical activity)</li> <li><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/echo.html/">echocardiogram</a> (ultrasound images and videos of the heart)</li> </ul> <h3>How Is Tricuspid Atresia Treated?</h3> <p>Treatment for tricuspid atresia combines medicine, surgery, and <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cardiac-catheter.html/">cardiac catheterization</a> to improve the flow of blood to the lungs. Replacing the tricuspid valve does not help because the right ventricle is not large enough to pump blood well.</p> <h4>Medicines</h4> <p>A medicine called <a class="kh_anchor">prostaglandin</a> E1 helps keep the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/patent-ductus-arteriosus.html/">ductus arteriosus</a> (often just called "the ductus") open. The ductus arteriosus is a normal blood vessel that connects two major arteries &mdash; the aorta and the pulmonary artery &mdash; that carry blood away from the heart. Keeping the ductus open in babies with tricuspid atresia improves the flow of blood to the lungs.</p> <h4>Surgery</h4> <p>These surgical steps (called the <strong>single ventricle pathway</strong>) can improve blood flow to the lungs in a baby with tricuspid atresia:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li><strong>At age 2 weeks or less:</strong> A <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary-blalock.html/">Blalock-Taussig (BT) shunt</a> redirects some of the left ventricle's output from the body to the lungs. &ndash; OR - If the blood flow to the lungs is too high, as can happen with a large ventricular septal defect, a band around the <a class="kh_anchor">pulmonary artery</a> lessens the flow to prevent damage.</li> <li><strong>At age 4‒6 months:</strong> The Glenn procedure allows blood returning from the upper part of the body to flow directly to the lungs. The BT shunt is removed at the same time.</li> <li><strong>At age 1.5‒3 years:</strong> The Fontan procedure channels blood from the lower half of the body to the lungs so the heart pumps oxygen-rich blood to the body only. Blood returning from the body flows to the lungs before passing through the heart.</li> </ul> <p>Doctors decide which steps to take based on what they learn from all the tests.</p> <h4>Cardiac Catheterization</h4> <p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cardiac-catheter.html/">Cardiac catheterization</a> can make or enlarge openings in the wall between the two atria and between the two ventricles. It also can be used to place a stent (mesh tube) in the ductus to keep it open.</p> <h3>Looking Ahead</h3> <p>Treatments for tricuspid atresia improve the baby's condition, but can't make the heart work like one without a defect. A child born with tricuspid atresia will regularly see a cardiologist (a doctor who treats heart problems) throughout childhood and as an adult.</p>Atresia tricúspideLos bebés que nacen con atresia tricúspide con frecuencia tienen síntomas graves poco tiempo después del nacimiento porque el flujo de sangre que va hacia los pulmones es mucho menor al normal.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/tricuspid-atresia-esp.html/722a6e35-3f26-49e2-bc3f-a490c22a2f27
Atrial Septal Defect (ASD)Atrial septal defect (ASD) — also known as a "hole in the heart" — is a type of congenital heart defect. Most ASDs are diagnosed and treated successfully.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/asd.html/2853e7be-1368-420f-bc8d-134350949604
Cardiac CatheterizationThis minimally invasive procedure helps doctors perform diagnostic tests on the heart and even treat some heart conditions.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cardiac-catheter.html/e17d1f5d-ba99-46a6-865b-c426321a7d47
Congenital Heart DefectsHeart defects happen when there's a problem with a baby's heart development during pregnancy. Most heart defects can be treated during infancy.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/if-heart-defect.html/3dd23fa7-906f-4df9-8638-7400b77bed42
Double Outlet Right Ventricle (DORV)Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a heart defect where the aorta connects to the heart in the wrong place.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dorv.html/3036f44c-409f-46fb-8d40-27f303f063b3
Heart and Circulatory SystemThe heart and circulatory system are our body's lifeline, delivering blood to the body's tissues. Brush up on your ticker with this body basics article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/heart.html/52398b6a-54a6-4272-a569-42ed5b12aeac
Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS)Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a birth defect of a baby’s heart. The left side of the heart doesn’t grow as it should, making it smaller and weaker than normal. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hypoplastic-heart.html/3f36bb72-0bef-42bc-b6de-c0fddf263c16
Interrupted Aortic Arch (IAA)An interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare heart condition in which the aorta doesn’t form completely. Surgery must be done within the first few days of a baby’s life to close the gap in the aorta. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/aortic-arch.html/d892fcbc-6205-4d08-83cb-903e58b78f39
Single Ventricle DefectsUsually, a heart has two working ventricles (pumping chambers). Having a single ventricle means that only one of the two ventricles works well enough to pump blood.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/single-vent-defects.html/a219f33f-7c17-4185-bee0-94605e2c973b
Truncus ArteriosusTruncus arteriosus is a heart defect that happens when a child is born with one large artery instead of two separate arteries.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/truncus-arteriosus.html/68c1aded-3ca9-4a04-bdf2-8222cafdd0e8
Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)Ventricular septal defect (VSD) — also known as a "hole in the heart" — is a congenital heart defect. Most VSDs are diagnosed and treated successfully.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/vsd.html/21135699-6b44-43bd-96b1-618186631849
Words to Know (Heart Glossary)A guide to medical terms about the heart and circulatory system. In an easy A-Z format, find definitions on heart defects, heart conditions, treatments, and more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/heart-glossary.html/ba52d6b8-f516-479b-b2de-ad634d6053da
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-cardiologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-cardiologyHeart & Blood Vesselshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/medical/heart/e9ef0549-4392-4778-974d-753019ce4b8bHeart Conditionshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hearthealth/heartconditions/ba7116cf-3c46-4896-8429-8be5c439795ehttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/tricuspidAtresiaEstab_433x259_enIL.pnghttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/tricuspidAtresia_433x259_enIL.png