Urine Test: Routine Cultureenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-testRoutineCult-enHD-AR1.gifA urine culture is used to diagnose a urinary tract infection (UTI) and determine what kinds of germs are causing it.routine urine cultures, germs, microorganisms, urinary tract infections, UTIs, diagnostic tests, pee, peeing, catheters, urine tests, urine infections, urine, medical tests, urinary, kidneys, urine specimens, urine cultures, abdominal pain02/13/200905/06/201909/02/2019f3af71b9-55f8-4c26-9585-51a0ddb9581bhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-urine.html/ <h3>What It Is</h3> <p>A routine urine culture detects the amount of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/germs.html/">germs</a> (microorganisms like bacteria) present in the urine.</p> <p>Once a urine sample is collected, a technician will keep it in conditions where microorganisms can multiply. Normally, no more than a small number of germs will be in the urine if there's no infection. If a larger number of germs are present, the technician will use a microscope or chemical tests to determine the specific types growing in the culture. The technician also may run tests to determine which medications will be most effective against the microorganism if the doctor diagnoses an infection.</p> <h3>Why It's Done</h3> <p>A urine culture is used to diagnose a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/">urinary tract infection (UTI)</a> and see what kinds of germs are causing it. The doctor may order a urine culture if your child:</p> <ul> <li>complains of a painful sensation when peeing</li> <li>feels the urge to pee frequently but doesn't produce much urine (also called urgency)</li> <li>has a fever of without a clear reason&nbsp;or has abdominal pain</li> <li>has a routine urinalysis that is abnormal, especially if it shows a high number of white blood cells</li> <li>has completed a course of treatment for a UTI, to see if the infection is gone</li> </ul> <h3>Preparation</h3> <p>No preparation other than cleansing the area around the urinary opening is required for the urine culture. Tell your doctor if your child is taking antibiotics or has taken them recently.</p> <h3>The Procedure</h3> <p>Collecting the sample should only take a few minutes. Your child will be asked to pee into a sterile sample cup in the doctor's office. If your child isn't potty trained and can't pee into a cup, a catheter (a narrow soft tube) may need to be inserted into the bladder to obtain the urine specimen.</p> <p>The skin surrounding the urinary opening has to be cleaned just before the urine is collected. In this "clean-catch" method, you or your child cleans the skin around the urinary opening with a special towelette. Your child then urinates into the toilet, stops momentarily, and then urinates again into the collection container. Catching the pee in "midstream" is the goal. The container shouldn't touch your child's skin. Be sure to wash your hands and your child's hands before and after this process.</p> <p>Sometimes it's preferable to collect a sample first thing in the morning after your child wakes up. If this is the case, you may be asked to help your child with the test at home. You'll take the sample to the lab, where a technician will test it for the presence of germs. Follow any storage and transportation instructions the lab gives you.</p> <h3>What to Expect</h3> <p>Because the test involves normal urination, there shouldn't be any discomfort as long as your child can provide a urine sample. (There may be temporary discomfort if a catheter was inserted to collect the urine.) It's important to keep the area around the urinary opening clean before the test and to catch the urine sample midstream.</p> <h3>Getting the Results</h3> <p>The results of the urine culture will be available in 1-3 days. Your doctor will go over the results with you and explain what they mean.</p> <h3>Risks</h3> <p>No risks are involved when providing a sample for a urine culture. If a catheterized specimen is required, it may cause temporary discomfort. You can discuss any questions you have about this procedure with your healthcare provider.</p> <h3>Helping Your Child</h3> <p>Urinating to provide the specimen for the test is usually painless. Ease your child&rsquo;s fears by explaining how the test will be conducted and why it's being done. Make sure your child understands that the urinary opening must be clean and the pee must be collected midstream.</p> <h3>If You Have Questions</h3> <p>If you have questions about the urine culture, speak with your doctor.</p> Análisis de la orina: cultivos de rutinaLos cultivos de rutina de la orina detectan la cantidad de gérmenes presentes en la orina.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/test-urine-esp.html/d887117f-c719-4766-8a43-40c43e9c720c
Blood in the Urine (Hematuria)If your child has blood in the urine, don't panic. Most of the time it's not serious. Find out what causes it and what to do about it.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hematuria.html/058cba73-f76f-4dcf-b6c5-734c445d0c86
First Aid: Pain With Urinating (Peeing)When it hurts to pee, a urinary tract infection (UTI) is usually to blame. But there are other causes. Here's what to do.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urination-pain-sheet.html/19085bc9-3c9c-4a81-abdc-681e16669fc7
Getting a Urine Test (Video)If your doctor wants a urine sample, he or she means pee. It's easy to give a sample. Watch how this test is done in this video for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/video-urtest.html/409712ff-7ef6-45fb-9168-853f10b0490b
Kidneys and Urinary TractThe bean-shaped kidneys, each about the size of a child's fist, are essential to our health. Their most important role is to filter blood and produce urine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/0cbf3444-1a45-4512-9af9-bc76e5592336
Movie: Urinary SystemWatch this movie about the urinary system, which produces pee.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/usmovie.html/9383ee79-0d68-4e64-ab41-0680cdcac139
Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related ConditionsRecurrent urinary tract infections can cause kidney damage if left untreated, especially in kids under age 6. Here's how to recognize the symptom of UTIs and get help for your child.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/recurrent-uti-infections.html/879c8981-5f68-4043-9679-090edaf99dc9
Urinary Tract InfectionsA urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common reasons that teens visit a doctor. Learn about the symptoms of UTIs, how they're treated, and more in this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/uti.html/a97f6174-4629-4696-b5bc-a461856cdd95
Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in kids. They're easy to treat and usually clear up in a week or so.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/6a6f9f52-f903-4360-877f-dd35d531d84f
Urine Test (Video)This video shows what it's like to get a urine test.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/video-urtest.html/e3255a0d-7e93-4be5-ae30-2d4c31a7b077
Urine Test: Automated Dipstick UrinalysisAutomated dipstick urinalysis results may point to a urinary tract infection (UTI) or injury, kidney disease, or diabetes.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-auto-ds.html/1150df63-c85a-46ce-83b7-08579c781753
Urine Test: DipstickA urine dipstick test is often done as part of an overall urinalysis. The results of this test can help doctors diagnose a urinary tract infection (UTI), kidney disease, diabetes, or a urinary tract injury.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dipstick.html/0933bbc1-3956-4651-8e80-2cb5b97583cb
Urine TestsIs your child having a urine culture or urinalysis performed? Find out why urine tests are performed, and what to expect when the doctor orders them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/labtest7.html/d8a510e5-7cb2-4868-9e5e-02f65dfb9f45
Your Urinary SystemYou pee every day, but what makes it happen? Find out in this article for kids about the urinary system.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/pee.html/6715ddc0-cd8e-428a-afd4-e3e3db22267f
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-infectiousDiseasekh:clinicalDesignation-pathologykh:clinicalDesignation-urologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-pathologyMedical Tests & Examshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/medical/b5327501-2bda-444b-8df1-a1af15af79cb