Urine Test: Microscopic Urinalysisenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-testMicroUrinalysis-enHD-AR1.gifA microscopic urinalysis can help detect a urinary tract infection (UTI), kidney problems, diabetes, or a urinary tract injury.diagnostic tests, microscopic urinalysis, urine samples, urinary tract infections, UTIs, kidney problems, diabetes, urinary tract injury, urinary tract injuries03/18/200905/06/201909/02/2019edcde322-9aed-46bf-8913-dc8fbb75c407https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-urinalysis.html/ <h3>What It Is</h3> <p>Microscopic urinalysis is often done as part of an overall urinalysis. After a urine (pee)&nbsp;sample is collected, it's put into a centrifuge &mdash; a special machine that separates the liquid in the urine from any solid components that may be present, such as blood cells, mineral crystals, or microorganisms. Any solid materials are then viewed under a microscope.</p> <h3>Why It's Done</h3> <p>The results of a microscopic urinalysis may point to a urinary tract infection (UTI), kidney problems, a metabolic disorder such as diabetes, or a urinary tract injury. If test results are abnormal, other tests may be needed before a definite diagnosis can be made.</p> <h3>Preparation</h3> <p>Cleansing the area around the urinary opening is required for the microscopic urinalysis. Your child might need to temporarily stop taking certain medications that could interfere with test results.</p> <h3>The Procedure</h3> <p>Your child will be asked to urinate into a clean sample cup in the doctor's office, in the hospital, or at home. If your child isn't potty trained and can't urinate into a cup, a catheter (a narrow soft plastic tube) may need to be inserted into the bladder to obtain the urine specimen.</p> <p>The skin surrounding the urinary opening has to be cleansed just before the urine is collected. In this "clean-catch" method, you or your child cleanses the skin around the urinary opening with a special towelette (this might need to be done more than once). Your child then urinates, stops momentarily, and then urinates again into the collection container. Catching the urine in "midstream" is the goal. Be sure to wash your hands and your child's hands before and after this process. Collecting the specimen should only take a few minutes.</p> <p>Occasionally, if the doctor is concerned about a urinary problem that isn't due to an infection, a urine collection bag with adhesive tape on one end might be used to collect a sample from an infant. If you're doing the collection at home, you'll clean your baby's genital area and then arrange the bag around the urinary opening. Once the bag is in place, you'll secure it with the attached tape. You can put a diaper on your baby after you've attached the bag. You'll be instructed on how to remove the bag once your baby has urinated into it, usually within an hour.</p> <p>If you obtain the specimen at home, follow any storage and transportation instructions the lab gives you.</p> <h3>What to Expect</h3> <p>Because the test involves normal urination, there shouldn't be any discomfort as long as your child can provide a urine specimen.</p> <h3>Getting the Results</h3> <p>The time it takes to get the results of the microscopic urinalysis can vary, and your doctor will review them with you. If abnormalities are found, further tests may be needed.</p> <h3>Risks</h3> <p>No risks are associated with collecting a midstream urine specimen for microscopic urinalysis. If a catheter is used to obtain the urine, it may cause temporary discomfort.</p> <h3>Helping Your Child</h3> <p>The routine microscopic urinalysis is painless. Explaining in simple terms how the test will be conducted and why it's being done can help ease any fear. If your doctor needs a clean-catch sample, make sure your child understands that the urinary opening must be clean and the urine must be collected midstream.</p> <h3>If You Have Questions</h3> <p>If you have questions about the microscopic urinalysis, speak with your doctor.</p> Análisis de orina: con microscopioEl análisis microscópico de orina se suele hacer como parte de un análisis de orina completo. Una vez que se recoge la muestra de orina (pis), se coloca en una centrifugadora, una máquina especial que separa el líquido de la orina de otros componentes sólidos, como los glóbulos sanguíneos, los cristales minerales o los microorganismos. Luego se observa el material sólido utilizando un microscopio.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/test-urinalysis-esp.html/10dc53e7-2515-4fc7-9d0e-a6f0d0c29ef9
Diabetes CenterDiabetes means a problem with insulin, an important hormone in the body. Find out how children with diabetes can stay healthy and do the normal stuff kids like to do.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/center/diabetes-center.html/0767277a-98f9-4541-b2f6-f3c68f43a94c
Getting a Urine Test (Video)If your doctor wants a urine sample, he or she means pee. It's easy to give a sample. Watch how this test is done in this video for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/video-urtest.html/409712ff-7ef6-45fb-9168-853f10b0490b
Kidney DiseaseSometimes, the kidneys can't do their job properly. In teens, kidney disease is usually due to infections, structural issues, glomerulonephritis, or nephrotic syndrome. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidney.html/4f21e885-14a9-4b12-a514-66998f93043c
Kidney Diseases in ChildhoodThe kidneys play a critical role in health. When something goes wrong, it could indicate a kidney disease. What are kidney diseases, and how can they be treated?https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidney-diseases-childhood.html/ce75e066-a9e8-498f-97e8-6459154b9748
Kidneys and Urinary TractThe bean-shaped kidneys, each about the size of a child's fist, are essential to our health. Their most important role is to filter blood and produce urine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/0cbf3444-1a45-4512-9af9-bc76e5592336
Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related ConditionsRecurrent urinary tract infections can cause kidney damage if left untreated, especially in kids under age 6. Here's how to recognize the symptom of UTIs and get help for your child.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/recurrent-uti-infections.html/879c8981-5f68-4043-9679-090edaf99dc9
Urinary Tract InfectionsA urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common reasons that teens visit a doctor. Learn about the symptoms of UTIs, how they're treated, and more in this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/uti.html/a97f6174-4629-4696-b5bc-a461856cdd95
Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in kids. They're easy to treat and usually clear up in a week or so.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/6a6f9f52-f903-4360-877f-dd35d531d84f
Urine Test: 24-Hour Analysis for Kidney StonesThis test can show if certain substances are found at high concentrations in the urine, and might be causing kidney stones.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/analysis-stones.html/76b1d68f-af4f-4dcb-813a-dd3804af3282
Urine Test: Automated Dipstick UrinalysisAutomated dipstick urinalysis results may point to a urinary tract infection (UTI) or injury, kidney disease, or diabetes.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-auto-ds.html/1150df63-c85a-46ce-83b7-08579c781753
Urine Test: DipstickA urine dipstick test is often done as part of an overall urinalysis. The results of this test can help doctors diagnose a urinary tract infection (UTI), kidney disease, diabetes, or a urinary tract injury.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dipstick.html/0933bbc1-3956-4651-8e80-2cb5b97583cb
Urine Test: ProteinThe urine protein test is most commonly used to screen for kidney disease and also can help monitor kidney function.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-protein.html/c3e958a1-f860-4e9b-85d5-e2ad8f28b6ac
Urine TestsIs your child having a urine culture or urinalysis performed? Find out why urine tests are performed, and what to expect when the doctor orders them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/labtest7.html/d8a510e5-7cb2-4868-9e5e-02f65dfb9f45
Word! UrinalysisEver peed in a cup?https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/word-urinalysis.html/28600d6f-d490-4fc1-9264-9565937c823d
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-nephrologykh:clinicalDesignation-pathologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-pathologyManaging Health Carehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cerebralpalsy-center/cp-healthcare/c3441eff-b2e9-402b-a9e4-caa7dd66cae4Medical Tests & Examshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/medical/b5327501-2bda-444b-8df1-a1af15af79cb