Stool Test: Ova and Parasites (O&P)enparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-testOvaParasite-enHD-AR1.gifThis exam may be done if your child has diarrhea for an extended period, blood or mucus in the stool, abdominal pain, nausea, headaches, or fever.stool samples, feces samples, stool tests, diagnostic tests, ova and parasites test, O&P tests, cysts, parasitic infections, diarrhea, untreated water03/02/200903/18/201909/02/20191421526a-51aa-4a0e-8e86-bdfc27a46ed6https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-oandp.html/ <h3>What It Is</h3> <p>A stool (feces) sample can provide valuable information about problems in the stomach, intestines, rectum, or other parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) system.</p> <p>In an ova and parasites (O&amp;P) exam, a technician views a sample of stool under a microscope to look for parasites and their ova (eggs) or cysts, which are hard shells that protect some parasites at a certain stage in their lifecycle.</p> <h3>Why It's Done</h3> <p>A doctor may request an O&amp;P exam if your child has symptoms of a possible parasitic infection, such as diarrhea for an extended period of time, blood or mucus in the stool, abdominal pain, nausea, headaches, or fever, especially if there's been an outbreak of parasitic illness at your child's school or daycare center, your child recently drank untreated water, or if your family recently visited a developing country.</p> <h3>Preparation</h3> <p>Unlike most other lab tests, a stool sample is often collected by parents at home, not by health care professionals at a hospital or clinic.</p> <p>If possible, your child may be asked to avoid certain foods and treatments for 2 weeks before the test, including:</p> <ul> <li>antacids, antidiarrheal drugs, and laxatives</li> <li>antibiotics and antiparasite drugs</li> <li>enemas</li> <li>contrast materials (liquids taken before some X-rays, CAT or CT scans, or other imaging studies)</li> </ul> <h3>Procedure</h3> <p>The doctor or hospital laboratory will usually provide written instructions on how to collect a stool sample. If instructions aren't provided, here are tips for collecting a stool sample from your child:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Be sure to wear latex gloves and wash your hands and your child's hands afterward.</li> <li>Many kids with diarrhea, especially young kids, can't always let a parent know in advance when a bowel movement is coming. So a hat-shaped plastic lid is used to collect the stool specimen. This catching device can be quickly placed over a toilet bowl, or under your child's bottom, to collect the sample. Using a catching device can prevent contamination of the stool by water and dirt. Another way to collect a stool sample is to loosely place plastic wrap over the seat of the toilet. Then place the stool sample in a clean, sealable container before taking it to the lab.</li> <li>Plastic wrap can also be used to line the diaper of an infant or toddler who isn't yet using the toilet. The wrap should be placed so that urine runs into the diaper, not the wrap.</li> <li>Your child shouldn't urinate into the container and, if possible, should empty his or her bladder before a bowel movement so the stool sample isn't diluted by urine.</li> <li>The stool should be collected into a clean, dry plastic jar with a screw-cap lid. For best results, the stool should be brought to the lab right away. If this isn't possible, the stool should be stored in preservative provided by the lab and then taken there as soon as possible.</li> </ul> <h3>What to Expect</h3> <p>When the sample arrives at the laboratory, a technician stains some of the stool specimen with a special dye and views it under a microscope to identify parasites or ova that are present.</p> <h3>Getting the Results</h3> <p>In general, the result of the ova and parasites test are reported within 2 days.</p> <h3>Risks</h3> <p>No risks are associated with collecting stool samples.</p> <h3>Helping Your Child</h3> <p>Collecting a stool sample is painless. Tell your child that collecting the stool won't hurt, but it has to be done carefully. A child who's old enough might be able to collect the sample alone to avoid embarrassment. Tell your child how to do this properly.</p> <h3>If You Have Questions</h3> <p>If you have questions about the ova and parasites test, speak with your doctor.</p> Muestra de heces: análisis de huevos y parásitosEs posible que el médico ordene el análisis de huevos y parásitos si su hijo presenta síntomas de una infección parasitaria.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/test-oandp-esp.html/30b26669-c746-4ae6-a6f5-1b1616e1b169
AmebiasisAmebiasis is an intestinal illness transmitted when someone eats or drinks something that's contaminated with a microscopic parasite.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/amebiasis.html/b310b6cc-8a54-4b7d-8101-b84231338943
AscariasisAscariasis is an intestinal infection that occurs when the eggs of a parasitic roundworm are ingested. Read about signs and symptoms, treatment, and tips for prevention.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ascariasis.html/089698e9-533a-4f18-839e-0bf3d1b9f74e
DiarrheaMost kids battle diarrhea from time to time, so it's important to know what to do to relieve and even prevent it.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/diarrhea.html/38efbf41-ac94-4d02-be5d-365f9b03cc12
Germs: Bacteria, Viruses, Fungi, and ProtozoaGerms are tiny organisms that can cause disease - and they're so small that they can creep into your system without you noticing. Find out how to protect yourself.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/care-about-germs.html/59b8feef-766a-4272-ac83-38140b1d176a
GiardiasisGiardiasis, one of the chief causes of diarrhea in the United States, is an intestinal illness caused by a microscopic parasite.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/giardiasis.html/f1cd6920-2964-4bd2-815f-d3b2a1ee3018
Pinworm InfectionsPinworm is an intestinal infection caused by tiny parasitic worms. But pinworms don't cause any harm (just itching), and it won't take long to get rid of them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/pinworm.html/405bcbf0-f0e0-4942-a9ae-0f9e1dfa9c6f
PinwormsIt's gross to think about but did you know that tiny worm eggs could be under your fingernails? Learn more about how to protect yourself from getting pinworms.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/pinworm.html/cff6fa7d-8fc3-429a-a5e8-2fa08e6c7b5c
Stool Test: Giardia AntigenThis test may be done if a child has watery diarrhea, abdominal pain, large amounts of intestinal gas, appetite loss, and nausea or vomiting.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-giardia.html/7f6ef65b-6970-473d-9bd1-23edf89ea4d2
Stool TestsYour child's doctor may order a stool collection test to check for blood, bacteria, ova, or parasites. Find out how this test is performed and when you can expect the results.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/labtest8.html/74d5d87f-1ab7-4c11-a9bc-126a3da3e933
TapewormTapeworms are usually more upsetting to think about than to deal with. Tapeworm infections are rare in the United States, and they're usually easy to treat.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/tapeworm.html/d8194e96-8736-4b58-9b6c-3e2db7b99b7a
ToxocariasisToxocara are common parasites of dogs and cats. When they infect humans, the illness is called toxocariasis.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/toxocariasis.html/fb3636eb-a413-4000-b6f8-e48d41c54317
What Are Germs?You know they can hurt you, but what are these invisible creatures? Find out in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/germs.html/cd877075-9d39-4c9a-b4f8-d67cb341050f
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-pathologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-pathologyMedical Tests & Examshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/medical/b5327501-2bda-444b-8df1-a1af15af79cb