Blood Test: Allergen-Specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE)enparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-testAllergenSpecIgE-enHD-AR1.gifThis blood test can check for some kinds of allergies.diagnostic tests, allergy, allergies, allergic reactions, allergen-specific immunoglobulin E, IgE, blood tests, allergens, CD1Allergy, antibodies, allergens12/05/200803/18/201909/02/20199acd5f17-0b42-4895-afb0-c774e40740a8https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-ige.html/<h3>What Is a Blood Test?</h3> <p>A blood test is when a sample of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/blood.html/">blood</a> is taken from the body to be tested in a lab. Doctors order blood tests to check things such as the levels of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/glucose.html/">glucose</a>, hemoglobin, or white blood cells. This can help them detect problems like a disease or medical condition. Sometimes, blood tests can help them see how well an organ (such as the liver or <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/">kidneys</a>) is working.</p> <h3>What Is an Allergen-Specific Immunoglobulin E Test?</h3> <p>An allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) test measures the levels of different IgE antibodies. Antibodies are made by the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/immune.html/">immune system</a> to protect the body from <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/germs.html/">bacteria</a>, viruses, and <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/allergen.html/">allergens</a>. IgE antibodies are normally found in small amounts in the blood, but higher amounts can be found when the body overreacts to allergens.</p> <p>IgE antibodies are different depending on what they react to. An allergen-specific IgE test can show what the body is reacting to.</p> <h3>Why Are IgE Tests Done?</h3> <p>An allergen-specific IgE test may be done to look for some kinds of allergies. These include types of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/food-allergies.html/">food</a>, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dander.html/">animal dander</a>, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/triggers-pollen.html/">pollen</a>, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/trigger-mold.html/">mold</a>, medicine, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dealing-dust-mites.html/">dust mites</a>, latex, or <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/sting-allergy.html/">insect</a> venom.</p> <h3>How Should We Prepare for an IgE Test?</h3> <p>Your child should be able to eat and drink normally unless also getting other tests that require fasting beforehand. Tell your doctor about any medicines your child takes because some drugs might affect the test results.&nbsp;</p> <p>Wearing a T-shirt or short-sleeved shirt for the test can make things easier for your child, and you also can bring along a toy or book as a distraction.</p> <h3>How Is an IgE Test Done?</h3> <p>Most blood tests take a small amount of blood from a vein. To do that, a health professional will:</p> <ul> <li>clean the skin&nbsp;</li> <li>put an elastic band (tourniquet) above the area to get the veins to swell with blood</li> <li>insert a needle into a vein (usually in the arm inside of the elbow or on the back of the hand)&nbsp;</li> <li>pull the blood sample into a vial or syringe</li> <li>take off the elastic band and remove the needle from the vein</li> </ul> <p>In babies, blood draws are sometimes done as a "heel stick collection." After cleaning the area, the health professional will prick your baby's heel with a tiny needle (or lancet) to collect a small sample of blood.</p> <p>Collecting a sample of blood is only temporarily uncomfortable and can feel like a quick pinprick.</p> <p><img class="left" title="drawing_blood" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/bloodTest-400x760-rd1-enIL.gif" alt="drawing_blood" name="974-031609_BLOODTEST_RD7.GIF" /></p> <p><img class="left" title="heel_prick_illustration" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/heelPrick-339x356-rd1-enIL.gif" alt="heel_prick_illustration" name="865-103108_HEELPRICK1-2_RD4.GIF" width="379" height="338" /></p> <h3>Can I Stay With My Child During an IgE Test?</h3> <p>Parents usually can stay with their child during a blood test. Encourage your child to relax and stay still because tensing muscles can make it harder to draw blood. Your child might want to look away when the needle is inserted and the blood is collected. Help your child to relax by taking slow deep breaths or singing a favorite song.</p> <h3>How Long Does an IgE Test Take?</h3> <p>Most blood tests take just a few minutes. Occasionally, it can be hard to find a vein, so the health professional may need to try more than once.</p> <h3>What Happens After an IgE Test?</h3> <p>The health professional will remove the elastic band and the needle and cover the area with cotton or a bandage to stop the bleeding. Afterward, there may be some mild bruising, which should go away in a few days.</p> <h3>When Are IgE Test Results Ready?</h3> <p>Blood samples are processed by a machine, and it may take a few days for the results to be available. If the test results show signs of a problem, the doctor might order other tests to figure out what the problem is and how to treat it.</p> <h3>Are There Any Risks From IgE Tests?</h3> <p>An IgE test is a safe procedure with minimal risks. Some kids might feel faint or lightheaded from the test. A few kids and teens have a strong fear of needles. If your child is anxious, talk with the doctor before the test about ways to make the procedure easier.</p> <p>A small bruise or mild soreness around the blood test site is common and can last for a few days. Get medical care for your child if the discomfort gets worse or lasts longer.</p> <p>If you have questions about the IgE test, speak with your doctor or the health professional doing the blood draw.</p>Análisis de sangre: inmunoglobulina E (IgE) alérgeno específicoLa prueba se lleva a cabo para ver cuáles son los alérgenos que producen alergias. Esta prueba es muy útil en el caso de los niños que han tenido reacciones graves a ciertos alérgenos que han puesto en riesgo su vida y para los cuales una prueba en la piel podría ser muy peligrosa.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/test-ige-esp.html/d77f6e59-38dc-4f74-902a-3488aa2bac5e
All About AllergiesMillions of Americans, including many kids, have an allergy. Find out how allergies are diagnosed and how to keep them under control.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/allergy.html/50114e1e-94ae-48c1-8769-b59b60036096
AllergiesYour eyes itch, your nose is running, you're sneezing, and you're covered in hives. The enemy known as allergies has struck again.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/allergies.html/713fb4e6-f5fa-49aa-b73a-c1488066a909
Allergy ShotsMany kids battle allergies year-round, and some can't control their symptoms with medications. For them, allergy shots (or allergen immunotherapy) can help.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/shots.html/560272a7-d80b-4017-979d-4a41bb4023ea
Allergy TestingDoctors use several different types of allergy tests, depending on what a person may be allergic to. Find out what to expect from allergy tests.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/allergy-tests.html/781afac6-a4a9-477f-a759-1cee604cebf5
Blood Test (Video)These videos show what's involved in getting a blood test and what it's like to be the person taking the blood sample.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/video-bldtest.html/267eef2d-8579-44db-adcb-641db49d0ec0
First Aid: Allergic ReactionsAlthough most allergic reactions aren't serious, severe reactions can be life-threatening and can require immediate medical attention.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/allergic-reaction-sheet.html/59bcd54d-cee6-4f0d-a758-11b1b6c61608
Food AllergiesFood allergies can cause serious and even deadly reactions in kids, so it's important to know how to feed a child with food allergies and to prevent reactions.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/food-allergies.html/d3040abf-fd78-4aac-be4a-3f2dd59957ef
Getting a Blood Test (Video)A blood test might sound scary, but it usually takes less than a minute. Watch what happens in this video for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/video-bldtest.html/13ac3212-6f5c-4741-8827-24b1c5a9549e
Learning About AllergiesDuring an allergic reaction, your body's immune system goes into overdrive. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/allergies.html/c4c99b6f-c068-41ef-a755-63be7a2fca42
Serious Allergic Reactions (Anaphylaxis)A person with severe allergies can be at risk for a sudden, serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. This reaction can seem scary, but the good news is it can be treated.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/anaphylaxis.html/0a39f182-b6cb-4509-990c-ba3790dad4b8
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-pathologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-pathologyAllergy Testinghttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/allergies/allergy-testing/c4d0a2e7-7727-4c04-a403-20df1dcc50bcFood Allergy Testinghttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/food-allergies/allergy-testing/0ca51a1e-25ec-4d81-83b8-326bed73f02aMedical Tests & Examshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/medical/b5327501-2bda-444b-8df1-a1af15af79cbhttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/bloodTest-400x760-rd1-enIL.gifhttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/heelPrick-339x356-rd1-enIL.gif