Blood Test: C-Reactive Protein (CRP)enparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-testCRP-enHD-AR1.gifA C-reactive protein (CRP) blood test is used to identify inflammation or infection in the body.C-reactive protein blood tests, CRP, diagnostic tests, inflammations, infections, inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis flare-ups, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, liver, liver tests, liver diseases, liver problems, blood, blood tests, medical tests, diagnostic tests, arthritis, immune system, autoimmune, ibd, inflammation, proteins, CD1Inflammatory Bowel Disease11/10/200803/18/201909/02/20191d3148c9-012c-458b-ba46-8370afa4e606https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-crp.html/<h3>What Is a Blood Test?</h3> <p>A blood test is when a sample of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/blood.html/">blood</a> is taken from the body to be tested in a lab. Doctors order blood tests to check things such as the levels of glucose, hemoglobin, or white blood cells. This can help them detect problems like a disease or medical condition. Sometimes, blood tests can help them see how well an organ (such as the liver or <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/">kidneys</a>) is working.</p> <h3>What Is a CRP Test?</h3> <p>A CRP test measures the level of C-reactive protein in the body. C-reactive protein levels can be high when there is inflammation or infection.</p> <h3>Why Are CRP Tests Done?</h3> <p>A CRP test may be done if a child has signs of inflammation or infection. CRP tests are used to follow conditions such as <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ibd.html/">inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)</a>, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/jra.html/">arthritis</a>, and <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/lupus.html/">lupus</a>. CRP tests also can help doctors see how well treatment for inflammation or infection is working.</p> <h3>How Should We Prepare for a CRP Test?</h3> <p>Your child may be asked to stop eating and drinking for 8 to 12 hours before the CRP test. Tell your doctor about any medicines your child takes because some drugs might affect the test results.</p> <p>Wearing a T-shirt or short-sleeved shirt for the test can make things easier for your child, and you also can bring along a toy or book as a distraction.</p> <h3>How Is a CRP Test Done?</h3> <p>Most blood tests take a small amount of blood from a vein. To do that, a health professional will:</p> <ul> <li>clean the skin</li> <li>put an elastic band (tourniquet) above the area to get the veins to swell with blood</li> <li>insert a needle into a vein (usually in the arm inside of the elbow or on the back of the hand)</li> <li>pull the blood sample into a vial or syringe</li> <li>take off the elastic band and remove the needle from the vein</li> </ul> <p>In babies, blood draws are sometimes done as a "heel stick collection." After cleaning the area, the health professional will prick your baby's heel with a tiny needle (or lancet) to collect a small sample of blood.</p> <p>Collecting a sample of blood is only temporarily uncomfortable and can feel like a quick pinprick.</p> <p><img class="left" title="drawing_blood" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/bloodTest-400x760-rd1-enIL.gif" alt="drawing_blood" name="974-031609_BLOODTEST_RD7.GIF" /></p> <p><img class="left" title="heel_prick_illustration" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/heelPrick-339x356-rd1-enIL.gif" alt="heel_prick_illustration" name="865-103108_HEELPRICK1-2_RD4.GIF" /></p> <h3>Can I Stay With My Child During a CRP Test?</h3> <p>Parents usually can stay with their child during a blood test. Encourage your child to relax and stay still because tensing muscles can make it harder to draw blood. Your child might want to look away when the needle is inserted and the blood is collected. Help your child to relax by taking slow deep breaths or singing a favorite song.</p> <h3>How Long Does a CRP Test Take?</h3> <p>Most blood tests take just a few minutes. Occasionally, it can be hard to find a vein, so the health professional may need to try more than once.</p> <h3>What Happens After a CRP Test?</h3> <p>The health professional will remove the elastic band and the needle and cover the area with cotton or a bandage to stop the bleeding. Afterward, there may be some mild bruising, which should go away in a few days.</p> <h3>When Are CRP Test Results Ready?</h3> <p>Blood samples are processed by a machine, and it may take a few hours to a day for the results to be available. If the test results show signs of a problem, the doctor might order other tests to figure out what the problem is and how to treat it.</p> <h3>Are There Any Risks From CRP Tests?</h3> <p>A CRP test is a safe procedure with minimal risks. Some kids might feel faint or lightheaded from the test. A few kids and teens have a strong fear of needles. If your child is anxious, talk with the doctor before the test about ways to make the procedure easier.</p> <p>A small bruise or mild soreness around the blood test site is common and can last for a few days. Get medical care for your child if the discomfort gets worse or lasts longer.</p> <p>If you have questions about the CRP test, speak with your doctor or the health professional doing the blood draw.</p>Análisis de sangre: Proteína C reactiva (PCR)Los médicos pueden solicitar un análisis de proteína C reactiva si los síntomas parecen indicar algún tipo de inflamación, particularmente en relación con el enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, las recaídas de artritis o una enfermedad autoinmune como la artritis reumatoide o el lupus.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/test-crp-esp.html/92d6e269-7cae-46a0-9422-e619b4209db1
ArthritisKids can get a kind of arthritis that causes joint pain. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/juv-rheum-arthritis.html/8d74d9e3-5b65-49cb-86b1-f03a78d98bb9
Blood Test (Video)These videos show what's involved in getting a blood test and what it's like to be the person taking the blood sample.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/video-bldtest.html/267eef2d-8579-44db-adcb-641db49d0ec0
Blood Test: Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT, or SGPT)An alanine aminotransferase (ALT) blood test is often part of an initial screening for liver disease.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-alt.html/1a82533c-5c64-4d69-bb63-4737900386e8
Blood Test: Basic Metabolic PanelA basic metabolic panel (BMP) is a group of blood tests that provide doctors with clues about how the body is working. Find out why doctors do this and what's involved for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-bmp.html/acc56baa-4973-4ec4-a72f-c21527648d02
Blood Test: BilirubinDoctors may order bilirubin blood tests for infants or older kids if they see signs of the skin taking on the yellow discoloration known as jaundice.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-bilirubin.html/02f4d92d-62b8-4b9b-b9c1-0d957f2e27b5
Blood Test: Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR)This test measures the speed at which red blood cells fall to the bottom of an upright glass test tube. Find out why doctors do it and what's involved for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-esr.html/0f5d92ed-ac26-4835-b422-2acdf3a22628
Getting a Blood Test (Video)A blood test might sound scary, but it usually takes less than a minute. Watch what happens in this video for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/video-bldtest.html/13ac3212-6f5c-4741-8827-24b1c5a9549e
Helping Kids Deal With Injections and Blood TestsBlood tests and insulin injections can be a challenge for kids with diabetes and their parents. Here are some strategies for coping with these necessary procedures.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/injections-tests.html/bbbd4d7c-63f1-4329-8e1f-9dbb2be678c0
Inflammatory Bowel DiseaseInflammatory bowel disease (IBD) refers to two chronic diseases that cause intestinal inflammation: ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Although they have features in common, there are some important differences.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ibd.html/cb91f77f-42ea-4e8c-ba7b-df35e1cbc35e
Juvenile Idiopathic ArthritisIn juvenile idiopathic arthritis (also called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis)), a person can develop swollen, warm, and painful joints. Learn more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/jra.html/64ceaa10-23cf-4f1c-b6e0-21bd7cb07b97
Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)Learn about juvenile idiopathic arthritis, a specific kind of arthritis that usually occurs in kids and teens younger than 17.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/juv-rheumatoid-arthritis.html/f118a90b-88e2-491c-bad2-24a8ef6e2144
LupusLupus is known as an autoimmune disease in which a person's immune system mistakenly works against the body's own tissues.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/lupus.html/5d0f4916-af65-49d3-afff-09d656af8ff1
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-pathologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-pathologyCaring for Your Childhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hearthealth/livingheartcond/a5caa6fd-b063-42fe-933e-6802d2bf0897Medical Tests & Examshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/medical/b5327501-2bda-444b-8df1-a1af15af79cbhttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/bloodTest-400x760-rd1-enIL.gifhttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/heelPrick-339x356-rd1-enIL.gif