Blood Test: Amylaseenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-testAmylase-enHD-AR1.gifAn amylase test may be done if a child has signs of a problem with the pancreas, such as belly pain, nausea, or vomiting. amylase blood tests, diagnostic tests, pancreas, pancreatitis, gallstones, cystic fibrosis, CF, inflammation of the pancreas, gallstones, pancreatic problems, problems with the pancreas, glucose, amylase, blood tests, blood samples, medical tests, enzymes, small intestines, amylase tests, decreased kidney function, kidneys, kidney problems, pancreas problems, lipase, urine amylase test, CD1Cystic Fibrosis02/03/200903/18/201909/02/2019b026e4f0-08e2-47a2-a583-11d87f153389https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-amylase.html/<h3>What Is a Blood Test?</h3> <p>A blood test is when a sample of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/blood.html/">blood</a> is taken from the body to be tested in a lab. Doctors order blood tests to check things such as the levels of glucose, hemoglobin, or white blood cells. This can help them detect problems like a disease or medical condition. Sometimes, blood tests can help them see how well an organ (such as the liver or <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/">kidneys</a>) is working.</p> <h3>What Is an Amylase Test?</h3> <p>An amylase test measures the amount of amylase in the blood. Amylase is an enzyme made by the salivary glands and the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/pancreas.html/">pancreas</a>. Amylase helps the body digest <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/sugar.html/">carbohydrates</a>. A high level of amylase in the blood can be a sign that the pancreas is injured, irritated, or blocked.</p> <h3>Why Are Amylase Tests Done?</h3> <p>An amylase test may be done if a child has signs of a problem with the pancreas, such as belly pain, nausea, or vomiting. It also might be done if a child is on medicine that makes problems with the pancreas more likely.</p> <h3>How Should We Prepare for an Amylase Test?</h3> <p>Your child may be asked to stop eating and drinking for 8 to 12 hours before the amylase test. Tell your doctor about any medicines your child takes because some drugs might affect the test results.</p> <p>Wearing a T-shirt or short-sleeved shirt for the test can make things easier for your child, and you also can bring along a toy or book as a distraction.</p> <h3>How Is an Amylase Test Done?</h3> <p>Most blood tests take a small amount of blood from a vein. To do that, a health professional will:</p> <ul> <li>clean the skin</li> <li>put an elastic band (tourniquet) above the area to get the veins to swell with blood</li> <li>insert a needle into a vein (usually in the arm inside of the elbow or on the back of the hand)</li> <li>pull the blood sample into a vial or syringe</li> <li>take off the elastic band and remove the needle from the vein</li> </ul> <p>In babies, blood draws are sometimes done as a "heel stick collection." After cleaning the area, the health professional will prick your baby's heel with a tiny needle (or lancet) to collect a small sample of blood.</p> <p>Collecting a sample of blood is only temporarily uncomfortable and can feel like a quick pinprick.</p> <p><img class="left" title="drawing_blood" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/bloodTest-400x760-rd1-enIL.gif" alt="drawing_blood" name="974-031609_BLOODTEST_RD7.GIF" /></p> <h3>Can I Stay With My Child During an Amylase Test?</h3> <p>Parents usually can stay with their child during a blood test. Encourage your child to relax and stay still because tensing muscles can make it harder to draw blood. Your child might want to look away when the needle is inserted and the blood is collected. Help your child to relax by taking slow deep breaths or singing a favorite song.</p> <h3>How Long Does an Amylase Test Take?</h3> <p>Most blood tests take just a few minutes. Occasionally, it can be hard to find a vein, so the health professional may need to try more than once.</p> <h3>What Happens After an Amylase Test?</h3> <p>The health professional will remove the elastic band and the needle and cover the area with cotton or a bandage to stop the bleeding. Afterward, there may be some mild bruising, which should go away in a few days.</p> <h3>When Are Amylase Test Results Ready?</h3> <p>Blood samples are processed by a machine, and it may take a few hours to a day for the results to be available. If the test results show signs of a problem, the doctor might order other tests to figure out what the problem is and how to treat it.</p> <h3>Are There Any Risks From Amylase Tests?</h3> <p>An amylase test is a safe procedure with minimal risks. Some kids might feel faint or lightheaded from the test. A few kids and teens have a strong fear of needles. If your child is anxious, talk with the doctor before the test about ways to make the procedure easier.</p> <p>A small bruise or mild soreness around the blood test site is common and can last for a few days. Get medical care for your child if the discomfort gets worse or lasts longer.</p> <p>If you have questions about the amylase test, speak with your doctor or the health professional doing the blood draw.</p>Análisis de sangre: amilasaEl médico indica un análisis de amilasa cuando sospecha que puede haber un problema en el páncreas, como una pancreatitis (inflamación del páncreas), cálculos o una obstrucción en el conducto que transporta la amilasa y otras sustancias del páncreas al intestino delgado. Los síntomas relacionados con una afección pancreática suelen ser dolor abdominal, fiebre, pérdida del apetito o náuseas. El análisis de amilasa también puede utilizarse para controlar a los pacientes con fibrosis quística.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/test-amylase-esp.html/867ecbfa-2d7d-4f21-ad6e-34c5b0c308f4
Blood Test (Video)These videos show what's involved in getting a blood test and what it's like to be the person taking the blood sample.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/video-bldtest.html/267eef2d-8579-44db-adcb-641db49d0ec0
Blood Test: LipaseA lipase test may be done if a child has signs of a problem with the pancreas, such as belly pain, nausea, or vomiting. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-lipase.html/4dc01edd-bfc6-44d7-a4f7-ada860e1dd2c
Cystic FibrosisCystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder that affects the lungs and digestive system Kids who have it can get lung infections often and have trouble breathing.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cf.html/a8599c25-ea2d-4839-9cf8-3ba990e27320
Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat TestIs your child scheduled to have a sweat test? Find out how this test is performed and how it's used to diagnose cystic fibrosis.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/sweat-test.html/4c78e8d2-75de-49d9-83b5-fb5c76dbb32e
Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Respiratory Screen: SputumKids with cystic fibrosis (CF) often get lung and airway infections. A sputum CF respiratory screen or culture helps doctors detect, identify, and treat infection-causing bacteria or fungi.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cf-screen.html/5a3dc4fc-4253-4e5f-a876-f53374456659
Digestive SystemThe digestive process starts even before the first bite of food. Find out more about the digestive system and how our bodies break down and absorb the food we eat.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/digestive.html/f2005e0d-6586-4e09-94e7-65388be2bb40
Getting a Blood Test (Video)A blood test might sound scary, but it usually takes less than a minute. Watch what happens in this video for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/video-bldtest.html/13ac3212-6f5c-4741-8827-24b1c5a9549e
PancreatitisPancreatitis is sometimes mistaken for a stomach virus because symptoms can include fever, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Symptoms usually get better on their own, but sometimes treatment is needed.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/pancreatitis.html/59694cc8-5405-4e96-9066-7dbcf1e1183a
Word! PancreasThe pancreas is a long, flat gland in your belly.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/word-pancreas.html/7cd4c45d-2be1-438c-97d4-40e9530cbc74
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-pathologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-pathologyMedical Tests & Examshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/medical/b5327501-2bda-444b-8df1-a1af15af79cbhttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/bloodTest-400x760-rd1-enIL.gif