Symbrachydactylyenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/Design_928_Symbrachydactyly_enHD_1.jpgBabies with symbrachydactyly are born with short often webbed fingers. Some might be missing fingers.syndactyly, short fingers, missing fingers, webbed, joined fingers, webbed fingers, webbed toes, joined toes, digits, conjoined, polydactyly, Symbrachydactyly, Thumb Duplication, Thumb Hypoplasia, Radial Club Hand, ortho, orthopedist, orthopedic, orthopaedic, ortho surgery, extremities, upper extremities, hand surgery, foot surgery, Ulnar Club Hand, clubfoot, club foot, too many fingers, not enough fingers, conjoined fingers, conjoined toes, hand disorders, orthopedic surgeons, conjoined digits, skeletal disorders, skeletal dysplasia06/06/201801/15/201909/02/2019Jennifer M. Ty, MD06/01/2018afe1b0ce-964d-477a-a395-e1f81141358chttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/symbrachydactyly.html/<h3>What Is Symbrachydactyly?</h3> <p>Babies with symbrachydactyly (sim-brak-ih-DAK-tuh-lee) are born with short, often webbed fingers. Some might be missing fingers.</p> <p>Symbrachydactyly usually affects just one hand or foot. Sometimes the forearm is short too.</p> <h3>What Causes Symbrachydactyly?</h3> <p>Symbrachydactyly happens before a baby is born. The arm starts as a small limb bud or bump from the body of the baby. Blood vessels help support growth in the limb bud. In babies with symbrachydactyly, the hand does not form completely. Experts think that is because of decreased blood flow to the limb bud as it develops.</p> <h3>Who Gets Symbrachydactyly?</h3> <p>Any baby can be born with symbrachydactyly. It does not run in families.</p> <p>Most babies who have symbrachydactyly do not have other health problems. But some also have a condition called <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/poland-syndrome.html/">Poland syndrome</a> in which part of the chest muscles are underdeveloped.</p> <h3>How Is Symbrachydactyly Diagnosed?</h3> <p>Symbrachydactyly may be seen before birth on an <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/prenatal-ultrasound.html/">ultrasound</a>. Otherwise, doctors diagnose it when the baby is born.</p> <p>Doctors do <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/xray-finger.html/">X-rays</a> to see if the bones are joined. This helps surgeons decide what kind of treatment is needed.</p> <h3>How Is Symbrachydactyly Treated?</h3> <p>Mild symbrachydactyly doesn't need treatment. In other cases, surgery is done. The surgery may help divide the fingers or toes. Most children with symbrachydactyly do not need prostheses (devices that replace a missing body part).</p> <h3>Looking Ahead</h3> <p>Almost all children with symbrachydactyly can do the usual things that other kids do. If needed, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/occupational-therapy.html/">occupational therapy (OT)</a> can help a child with this.</p>SimbraquidactiliaLos bebés con simbraquidactilia nacen con los dedos cortos, a menudo unidos entre sí por membranas. A algunos pueden faltarles dedos.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/symbrachydactyly-esp.html/c90190b3-f83b-473a-b264-2228c88934c6
Bones, Muscles, and JointsWithout bones, muscles, and joints, we couldn't stand, walk, run, or even sit. The musculoskeletal system supports our bodies, protects our organs from injury, and enables movement.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/bones-muscles-joints.html/53199934-b6d8-4854-8362-8b1dfc45c3f6
Chest Wall Disorder: Poland SyndromePoland syndrome is a condition where a child is born with missing or underdeveloped chest muscles.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/poland-syndrome.html/0292f53d-3f26-4a1d-ad23-52256f55426d
Occupational TherapyOccupational therapy can help improve kids' cognitive, physical, and motor skills and build their self-esteem and sense of accomplishment.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/occupational-therapy.html/e6873992-af60-4bab-82d9-3bd1fe9ad5a3
PolydactylyPolydactyly is when a baby is born with an extra finger on the hand or an extra toe on the foot. It can be on one or both hands or feet.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/polydactyly.html/684055dc-071c-4973-8ce6-9281a43185ae
Radial DysplasiaBabies with radial dysplasia (also called radial club hand) are born with a short or missing radial bone. This makes the wrist turn in.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/radial-dysplasia.html/6fa65f17-f1df-47fb-8f7b-35cb8efeccb5
SyndactylySyndactyly is when a baby is born with two or more fingers or toes joined or "webbed" together. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/syndactyly.html/5edd8317-51f6-443c-b25c-5ec74bd7218b
Thumb DuplicationBabies with thumb duplication (or thumb polydactyly) are born with an extra thumb on one or both hands. Most will have surgery to fix the problem.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/thumb-duplication.html/f0a9cba2-ac76-470e-9d43-4345a6d57493
Thumb HypoplasiaBabies with thumb hypoplasia are born with a thumb that is smaller than normal, or with the thumb missing completely.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/thumb-hypoplasia.html/c8fbf7e7-948b-4209-b1ed-e038838968e2
Ulnar DysplasiaBabies with ulnar dysplasia (also called ulnar club hand) are born with a short or missing ulnar bone. This makes the wrist turn out.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ulnar-dysplasia.html/99df5db6-d7ab-419d-bae9-56fd26c29bcd
X-Ray Exam: FingerDoctors may order a finger X-ray to find the cause of symptoms such as pain, tenderness, or swelling, or to detect broken bones or dislocated joints.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/xray-finger.html/3a43d22f-4cd4-4a9e-b5b8-ca7c9eba5fd6
X-Ray Exam: HandA hand X-ray can help find the cause of pain, tenderness, swelling, and deformity. It also can detect broken bones or dislocated joints.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/xray-hand.html/64b6be7e-e187-4bd6-a004-a72afbdf6296
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:age-toddlerOneToThreekh:clinicalDesignation-generalSurgerykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-orthopedicsNonSportsMedBones & Muscleshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/medical/bones/309954d5-03dd-446c-9d39-3e66eeb99f97