First Aid: Seizuresenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-FA-Seizures-enHD.jpgAlthough seizures can be frightening, usually they last only a few minutes, stop on their own, and are almost never life-threatening.safety sheet, first-aid, firstaid, first aid, seizures, seizure, siezure, siezures, sezures, sezure, cezure, cezures, cesure, cesures, what to do when your child has a seizure, my child is having a seizure, convulsions, convulsion, emergency, emergency room, my child has seizures, my child had a seizure07/28/200309/26/201809/02/2019Kate M. Cronan, MD07/10/2018b5b828f7-d921-49cf-9b8a-79401d2378e9https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seizures-sheet.html/<p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/first-aid-guides.html/"><img class="right" title="Parents image" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-firstaid-enBT.jpg" alt="First Aid" name="4990-P_FIRSTAID_ENBT.JPG" /></a></p> <p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seizure.html/">Seizures</a> are almost never life-threatening. Many last only a few minutes and stop on their own. Still, it can be alarming to see a child having a seizure, and it helps to know what to do.</p> <h3>Signs and Symptoms</h3> <p>Seizures can take many forms, from staring spells to involuntary movements of the arms and legs. Some signs a child might be having a seizure are:</p> <ul> <li>unusual sensations or twitching before the seizure</li> <li>staring, not responding to anyone</li> <li>uncontrollable muscle spasms</li> <li>loss of consciousness (passes out)</li> <li>uncontrolled peeing or pooping</li> </ul> <h3>What to Do if Your Child Has a Seizure:</h3> <p>If someone is nearby, ask them to call your child's doctor. If no one is with you, follow the steps below and then call the doctor:</p> <ol> <li>Gently place your child on the floor or ground, and remove any nearby objects.</li> <li>Lay your child on his or her side to prevent choking on saliva (spit).</li> <li>If your child vomits, clear out the mouth gently with your finger.</li> <li>Loosen any clothing around the head or neck.</li> <li>Make sure your child is breathing OK.</li> <li>Don't try to prevent your child from shaking &mdash; this will not stop the seizure and may make your child more uncomfortable.</li> <li>Don't put anything in your child's mouth. Your child will not swallow his or her tongue, and forcing teeth apart could cause injuries or block the airway.</li> <li>Don't give your child anything to eat or drink, and don't give any medicine pills or liquid by mouth until your child is completely awake and alert.</li> <li>Try to keep track of how long the seizure lasts.</li> <li>Your child may be sleepy or may take a while to get back to normal after the seizure. Stay with your child until he or she is awake and aware, and let your child rest after the seizure.</li> </ol> <h3>Get Emergency Medical Care or Call 911 if Your Child:</h3> <ul> <li>has a seizure lasting more than 5 minutes or is having repeated seizures</li> <li>has trouble breathing</li> <li>has a bluish color on the lips, tongue, or face</li> <li>remains unconscious for more than a few minutes after a seizure</li> <li><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/falls-sheet.html/">falls</a> or hits his or her head before or during a seizure</li> <li>seems to be sick</li> <li>has a seizure while in water</li> <li>has any symptom that concerns you</li> </ul> <h3>Think Prevention!</h3> <p>If your child has a known seizure condition, be sure that he or she gets plenty of&nbsp;rest and takes any prescribed seizure medicine on time.</p>
Benign Rolandic EpilepsyKids with benign rolandic epilepsy of childhood (BREC) have seizures that involve twitching, numbness, or tingling of the face or tongue.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/brec.html/cacf42b8-6bd0-4265-92db-97852a24d2cd
Childhood Absence Epilepsy (CAE)Kids with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) have seizures where they "blank out" for a few seconds. Most kids will outgrow CAE.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/childhood-absence-epilepsy.html/612e939f-cd06-4a14-8904-279264e58bb8
EpilepsySeizures are a common symptom of epilepsy, a condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Learn all about epilepsy, including what to do if you see someone having a seizure.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/epilepsy.html/85df049a-dc59-41a5-b92c-421ea2d711be
Febrile SeizuresFebrile seizures are full-body convulsions caused by high fevers that affect young kids. Although they can be frightening, they usually stop on their own and don't cause any other health problems.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/febrile.html/85d50f3c-9caa-4f88-9a3c-e55ab0a9b537
First Aid: Febrile SeizuresFebrile seizures are convulsions that happen in some children with fevers. They usually stop on their own after a few minutes and don't cause any other health problems.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/febrile-seizures-sheet.html/804b66fe-076e-4851-9990-ef93e771fe1d
Infantile SpasmsInfantile spasms (IS) is a seizure disorder in babies. The spasms usually go away by age 4, but many babies with IS will have other kinds of epilepsy later.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/infantile-spasms.html/690f06dd-3b84-48f3-8549-838fb4c9bdcd
Intractable EpilepsyIntractable epilepsy is when a child's seizures can't be controlled by medicines. Doctors may recommend surgery or other treatments for intractable seizures.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/intractable-epilepsy.html/b8735f52-1cd8-4dc4-9c1e-b0af479bdac5
Juvenile Myoclonic EpilepsyKids with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) have one or more of several different kinds of seizures, which begin around the age of puberty.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/juvenile-myoclonic-epilepsy.html/f594267f-fabd-48e1-95b8-45e3483b107a
SeizuresSeizures are caused by a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain. Find out what you need to know about seizures and what to do if your child has one.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seizure.html/17184860-dea1-4cd4-95ba-3cf34539cd44
Temporal Lobe EpilepsyKids with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) have seizures that start in one of the temporal lobes of the brain. Seizures usually get better with medicine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/temporal-lobe-epilepsy.html/a45446cb-f4f8-4aa6-a259-9248db76f764
Word! SeizureYou might hear a seizure called a convulsion, fit, or spell.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/word-seizure.html/70e445af-ba78-41bd-94f7-293962fa407b
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-emergencyMedicinekh:clinicalDesignation-neurologykh:genre-printablekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-neurologyPrintable Safety Guideshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/firstaid-safe/sheets/693dcca2-3462-4fa1-b94f-229a1072c7adhttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-firstaid-enBT.jpg