Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever)enparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-seasonAllergies-enHD-AR1.jpgAt various times of the year, pollen and mold spores trigger the cold-like symptoms associated with seasonal allergies. Most kids find relief through reduced exposure to allergens or with medicines.seasonal allergy, allergies, alergy, hayfever, hay fever, rose fever, seasonal allergic rhinitis, pollen, tree, grass, weed, mold spore, pollen count, runny nose, congestion, sneeze, sneezing, congested, asthma, asma, wheezing, trouble breathing, pinkeye, pink eye, conjunctivitis, allergen, allergy symptoms, seasons, weather, fall, spring, winter, summer, allergy skin test, immunotherapy, allergy shot, CD1Allergy04/27/201011/17/201709/02/2019Jordan C. Smallwood, MD10/01/2016cecd684d-418a-4344-a892-cb1894d92d82https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seasonal-allergies.html/<h3>About Seasonal Allergies</h3> <p><em>"Achoo!"</em> It's your son's third sneezing fit of the morning, and as you hand him another tissue you wonder if these cold-like symptoms &mdash; the sneezing, congestion, and runny nose &mdash; have something to do with the recent weather change. If he gets similar symptoms at the same time every year, you're likely right: seasonal allergies are at work.</p> <p><strong>Seasonal allergies</strong>, sometimes called "hay fever" or seasonal allergic rhinitis, are allergy symptoms that happen during certain times of the year, usually when outdoor molds release their spores, and trees, grasses, and weeds release tiny pollen particles into the air to fertilize other plants.</p> <p>The <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/immune.html/">immune systems</a> of people who are allergic to mold spores or pollen treat these particles (called allergens) as invaders and release chemicals, including histamine, into the bloodstream to defend against them. It's the release of these chemicals that causes allergy symptoms.</p> <p>People can be allergic to one or more types of pollen or mold. The type someone is allergic to determines when symptoms happen. For example, in the mid-Atlantic states, tree pollination is February through May, grass pollen runs from May through June, and weed pollen is from August through October &mdash; so kids with these allergies are likely to have increased symptoms at those times. Mold spores tend to peak midsummer through the fall, depending on location.</p> <p>Even kids who have never had seasonal allergies in years past can develop them. Seasonal allergies can start at almost any age, though they usually develop by the time someone is 10 years old and reach their peak in the early twenties, with symptoms often disappearing later in adulthood.</p> <h3>Signs and Symptoms</h3> <p>If your child develops a "cold" at the same time every year, seasonal allergies might be to blame. Allergy symptoms, which usually come on suddenly and last as long as a person is exposed to the allergen, can include:</p> <ul> <li>sneezing</li> <li>itchy nose and/or throat</li> <li>nasal congestion</li> <li>clear, runny nose</li> <li>coughing</li> </ul> <p>These symptoms often come with itchy, watery, and/or red eyes, which is called allergic <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/conjunctivitis.html/">conjunctivitis</a>. Kids who have wheezing and shortness of breath in addition to these symptoms might have allergies that trigger&nbsp;<a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/asthma-center.html/">asthma</a>.</p> <h3>Diagnosis</h3> <p>Seasonal allergies are fairly easy to identify because the pattern of symptoms returns from year to year following exposure to an allergen.</p> <p>Talk with your doctor if you think your child might have allergies. The doctor will ask about symptoms and when they appear and, based on the answers and a physical exam, should be able to make a diagnosis. If not, the doctor may refer you to an allergist for blood tests or allergy skin tests.</p> <p>To find an allergy's cause, allergists usually do <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/skin-test.html/">skin tests</a> in one of two ways:</p> <ol class="kh_longline_list"> <li>A drop of a purified liquid form of the allergen is dropped onto the skin and the area is pricked with a small pricking device.&nbsp;If a child reacts to the allergen, the skin will swell a little in that area.</li> <li>A small amount of allergen is injected just under the skin. This test stings a little but isn't extremely painful. After about 15 minutes, if a lump surrounded by a reddish area appears (like a mosquito bite) at the injection site, the test is positive.</li> </ol> <p>Even if a skin test or a blood test shows an allergy, a child must <strong>also</strong> have symptoms to be definitively diagnosed with an allergy. For example, a child who has a positive test for grass pollen <strong>and</strong> sneezes a lot while playing in the grass would be considered allergic to grass pollen.</p> <h3>Treatment</h3> <p>There are many ways to treat seasonal allergies, depending on how severe the symptoms are. The most important part of treatment is knowing what allergens are at work. Some kids can get relief by <a class="kh_anchor">reducing or eliminating exposure to allergens</a> that bother them.</p> <p>If certain seasons cause symptoms, keep the windows closed, use air conditioning if possible, and stay indoors when pollen/mold/weed counts are high.&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 1em;">It's also a good idea for kids with seasonal allergies to wash their hands or shower and change clothing after playing outside.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>If reducing exposure isn't possible or is ineffective, medicines can help ease allergy symptoms. These may include decongestants, antihistamines, and nasal spray steroids. If symptoms can't be managed with medicines, the doctor may recommend taking your child to an allergist or immunologist for evaluation for <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/shots.html/">allergy shots</a> (immunotherapy), which can help desensitize kids to specific allergens.</p>Alergia estacional (fiebre del heno)Las alergias estacionales se pueden iniciar prácticamente en cualquier momento de la vida de una persona, aunque se suelen desarrollar cuando la persona tiene unos 10 años. Suelen alcanzar su máxima expresión a principios de la segunda década de la vida y los síntomas alérgicos suelen desaparecer en etapas posteriores de la vida adulta.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/seasonal-allergies-esp.html/c68437d2-7d83-43ce-abf2-f92f3a9d99c7
All About AllergiesMillions of Americans, including many kids, have an allergy. Find out how allergies are diagnosed and how to keep them under control.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/allergy.html/50114e1e-94ae-48c1-8769-b59b60036096
AllergiesExplore more than 20 articles in English and Spanish about all aspects of allergies in children.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/allergies-center.html/534b89db-c154-456f-87cc-a887772f96a7
Allergy ShotsMany kids battle allergies year-round, and some can't control their symptoms with medications. For them, allergy shots (or allergen immunotherapy) can help.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/shots.html/560272a7-d80b-4017-979d-4a41bb4023ea
Allergy TestingDoctors use several different types of allergy tests, depending on what a person may be allergic to. Find out what to expect from allergy tests.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/allergy-tests.html/781afac6-a4a9-477f-a759-1cee604cebf5
Blood Test: Allergen-Specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE)This blood test can check for some kinds of allergies.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-ige.html/9acd5f17-0b42-4895-afb0-c774e40740a8
Do Allergies Cause Asthma?Kids who have allergies also might have a breathing problem called asthma. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/allergies-asthma.html/407da670-48a4-445f-833a-07c408cc214c
First Aid: Allergic ReactionsAlthough most allergic reactions aren't serious, severe reactions can be life-threatening and can require immediate medical attention.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/allergic-reaction-sheet.html/59bcd54d-cee6-4f0d-a758-11b1b6c61608
Hives (Urticaria)Has your child broken out in welts? It could be a case of the hives. Learn how to soothe itchy bumps and help your child feel better.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hives.html/5e85e905-de3c-4c9a-829a-566f37d712a5
How Do Doctors Test for Allergies?Find out what the experts have to say.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/allergy-testing.html/2aad8cf7-9455-471d-97fb-11f3093c59ec
Learning About AllergiesDuring an allergic reaction, your body's immune system goes into overdrive. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/allergies.html/c4c99b6f-c068-41ef-a755-63be7a2fca42
What Is Skin Testing for Allergies?A scratch or skin prick test is a common way doctors find out more about a person's allergies.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/skin-test.html/cd2bf968-d812-40dd-bac5-23853e0f6291
What Makes Me Sneeze?If you just sneezed, something was probably irritating or tickling the inside of your nose. Learn more about why you sneeze in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/sneeze.html/4ad7017a-7973-44d7-a4a3-ee34626ea270
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-allergykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-allergyAllergies & the Immune Systemhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/medical/allergies/22d1d841-c54a-4649-872e-9cd10af36de5Asthma & Allergieshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/asthma-center/asthma-allergies/92b1258a-4ea4-475e-9203-1ac3e9ae1c99