Household Safety: Preventing Injuries From Falling, Climbing, and Grabbingenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-preventFall-enHD-AR1.gifHere's how to help protect kids from a dangerous fall or a tumble into a sharp edge in your home.baby, toddler, toddlers, infant, infants, newborn, newborns, safety, medicines, medications, cleaning supplies, poisons, poison control, gates, cabinet locks, cruising, crawling, walking, toddling, rolling, playpens, safety gates, houseplants, plants, falls, stairs, childproofing, child proofing, kid-proof, walkers, trampolines, walking, toddlers, baby gates, household safety, windows, stairways09/27/200506/11/201806/11/2018Kate M. Cronan, MD05/29/2018c1e23edf-2e4f-4a10-8e62-d8ec57df568chttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/safety-falls.html/<p>Babies reach, grasp, roll, sit, and eventually crawl, pull up, "cruise" along furniture, and walk. At many stages in the first 2 years, they're able to move around, tumble over, and get into things in one way or another. And toddlers will try to climb but&nbsp;may not have the coordination to react to certain dangers. They'll pull themselves up using table legs; they'll use bureaus and dressers as jungle gyms; they'll reach for whatever they can see.</p> <p>So the potential for a dangerous fall or a tumble into a sharp edge can happen in nearly every area of your home.</p> <p>Here are ways to help prevent kids from getting hurt in your home:</p> <h2><strong>Walkers</strong></h2> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Don't use a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/products-walkers.html/">walker</a> for an infant or toddler. More than 3,000 walker-related injuries a year are treated in U.S. hospital emergency rooms. Babies in walkers can fall over objects; roll into hot stoves, pools, and heaters; and roll down stairs. Walkers may give a baby the momentum needed to break through a gate (sometimes with stairs on the other side).</li> <li>Instead of a walker, consider an activity saucer that doesn't move.</li> </ul> <h2><strong>Windows</strong></h2> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Don't rely on window screens to keep kids from falling out of windows.</li> <li>Open windows from the top or use window guards to prevent your child from falling through screens or open windows (kids can fall from windows opened as little as 5 inches, or 12.7 centimeters). Make sure window guards are childproof but easy for adults to open in case of fire.</li> <li>Move chairs, cribs, beds, and other furniture away from windows to prevent children from climbing onto sills.</li> </ul> <h2><strong>Stairs</strong></h2> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Never leave a child alone around stairs &mdash; even those that are gated. Babies can climb up the gate at the top of the steps and fall from an even greater height. Install a safety gate at the door of your child's room to prevent the baby from reaching the top of the stairs.</li> <li>Keep stairways clear of toys, shoes, loose carpeting, etc.</li> <li>Place a guard on banisters and railings if your child can fit through the rails.</li> <li>Install hardware-mounted safety gates at the top and bottom of every stairway (pressure-mounted gates aren't as secure).</li> <li>Avoid accordion gates, which can trap a child's head.</li> <li>Teach your toddler how to go down stairs backward &mdash; your child's only example is you going down forward.</li> </ul> <h2><strong>Around Your Home</strong></h2> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Don't keep loose rugs on the floor.</li> <li>Never put babies in child safety seats, infant seats, or bouncer seats on a countertop or on top of furniture. The force of the baby's movements could propel the seat over the side and cause serious injuries.</li> <li>Make sure all pieces of furniture a child might climb on &mdash; tables, bureaus, cabinets, TV stands, etc. &mdash; are sturdy and won't fall over. Be particularly careful of top-heavy pieces like overloaded bookshelves, tall dressers, or entertainment centers that can fall on your child. You can also buy "L" brackets to attach furniture to walls to prevent your child from climbing on furniture and having it topple over.</li> <li>Attach protective padding or other specially designed covers to corners of coffee tables, furniture, fireplace hearths, and countertops with sharp edges.</li> <li>Clean up any spills around the home right away.</li> <li>Apply nonskid strips to the bottoms of bathtubs.</li> </ul> <h2><strong>Cribs, Beds, and Changing Tables</strong></h2> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Never leave a baby unattended on a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/products-changing-tables.html/">changing table</a> or bed. If you get a phone call while you have your baby on the changing table, hold your baby while you answer the call or check your phone later. If you must leave for a moment, put the baby in a playpen or crib.</li> <li>Use changing tables with 2-inch (5-centimeter) guardrails.</li> <li>Always secure and use safety belts on changing tables, as well as on strollers, carriages, and highchairs. Be sure to strap a small child securely into the seat of a store shopping cart.</li> <li>Keep side rails up on <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/products-cribs.html/">cribs</a>.</li> <li>Crib bumpers are not recommended because of the risk of a baby getting stuck or suffocating. Don't put a child under age 6 on the top bunk of a bunk bed. For older kids, attach guardrails to the side of the top bunk.</li> </ul> <h2><strong>Outdoors</strong></h2> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Never allow a child to play on a trampoline, even with adult supervision.</li> <li>Be sure outdoor <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/playground.html/">playground</a> equipment is safe, with no loose parts or rust.</li> <li>Make sure playground surfaces are soft enough to absorb the shock of falls. Good surface materials include sand and wood chips; avoid playgrounds with concrete and packed dirt.</li> <li>Make sure sidewalks and outdoor steps are clear of toys, objects, and anything blocking a clear path. Repair any cracks or missing pieces in walkways.</li> <li>If your child has started to ride a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/bike-safety.html/">bike</a>, make sure he or she wears a helmet and is well-versed in bicycle safety and signals. Head injuries are far too common in this age group, so enforce your helmet rule.</li> </ul> <h3><strong>Be Prepared</strong></h3> <p>Whether you're expecting a baby or already have a child, it's a good idea to:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Learn <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cpr.html/">CPR</a> and the Heimlich maneuver.</li> <li>Keep these numbers near the phone (for yourself and caregivers) and put them in your cellphone: <ul> <li>toll-free poison-control number: 1-800-222-1222</li> <li>doctor's number</li> <li>parents' work numbers and other contact information</li> <li>neighbor's or nearby relative's number (if you need someone to watch other children in an emergency)</li> </ul> </li> <li>Make a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/firstaid-kit.html/">first-aid kit</a> and keep emergency instructions inside.</li> <li>Install smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.</li> </ul>Seguridad en casa: cómo prevenir las lesiones por caídas y por intentos de treparse a muebles o de agarrar objetosEl potencial para una caída peligrosa o una pequeña caída hacia una esquina puntiaguda puede ocurrir a cualquier edad del niño(a) en cualquier área de su hogar. A continuación detallamos las medidas que usted puede tomar para ayudar a prevenir que su hijo(a) sufra accidentes en el hogar.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/safety-falls-esp.html/8941f6dd-3de9-43c4-b781-8863a85511fa
Bedrooms: Household Safety ChecklistUse these checklists to make a safety check of your home, including your nursery, child's room, adult's bedroom. You should answer "yes" to all of these questions.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/household-checklist-bedroom.html/7599ab4d-6af7-47b9-95e6-8c5a70160472
Childproofing and Preventing Household AccidentsYou might think of babies and toddlers when you hear the words "babyproofing" or "childproofing," but unintentional injury is the leading cause of death in kids 14 and under.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/childproof.html/0dfb8dee-0285-4d87-a4d3-a048bdc1289e
ConcussionsConcussions are serious injuries that can be even more serious if kids don't get the time and rest needed to heal them completely. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/concussions.html/f0716867-b0f2-4cf4-80f7-6fa399028462
First Aid: Broken BonesA broken bone needs emergency medical care. Here's what to do if you think your child just broke a bone.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/broken-bones-sheet.html/421bf2cd-ba6b-4220-a1bb-a52eddb36fc5
First Aid: FallsAlthough most result in mild bumps and bruises, some falls can cause serious injuries that need medical attention.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/falls-sheet.html/1cb1d94d-8d61-4ea2-8607-27bdffc5b098
Household Safety ChecklistsYoung kids love to explore their homes, but are unaware of the potential dangers. Learn how to protect them with our handy household safety checklists.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/household-checklist.html/dc6bee21-6c4d-41fb-a5fa-136ae12e0017
Playground SafetyFollowing these safety guidelines can make neighborhood playgrounds entertaining and safe for your kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/playground.html/5662a11e-91c6-4afa-bf0f-0db7989b4526
Walls & Floors, Doors & Windows, Furniture, Stairways: Household Safety ChecklistUse these checklists to make a safety check of your home, including your walls, floors, furniture, doors, windows, and stairways. You should answer "yes" to all of these questions.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/household-checklist-walls.html/ad9e8842-e52b-4b23-bb72-4f891622410f
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-generalPediatricskh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-generalPediatricsSafety at Homehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/firstaid-safe/home/465d0456-9cfc-47e2-b4ff-b93dd23aa7b3