Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder)enparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-ultrasoundRenal-enHD-AR1.gifA renal ultrasound makes images of your child's kidneys, ureters, and bladder. Doctors may order this test if they suspect kidney damage, cysts, tumors, kidney stones, or complications from urinary tract infections.renal ultrasound, kidneys, ureters, bladders, kidney stones, urinary tract infections, UTIs, diagnostic tests, medical tests, kidney damage, cysts, tumors, kidneys, renal, radiology, sonographer, ultrasound imaging, ultrasounds, imaging, CD1Nephrology, CD1Urology, CD1Sedation11/03/200803/26/201909/02/201905b3083e-733a-40c6-9fd9-5a38877ccc4fhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/renal-ultrasound.html/ <h3>What It Is</h3> <p>A renal ultrasound is a safe and painless test that uses sound waves to make images of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder.</p> <p>The kidneys are a pair of bean-shaped organs located toward the back of the abdominal cavity, just above the waist. They remove waste products from the blood and produce urine. The ureters are thin tubes that carry the urine from the kidneys to the bladder.</p> <p>During the examination, an ultrasound machine sends sound waves into the kidney area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal structure of the kidneys and related organs.</p> <h3>Why It's Done</h3> <p>Doctors order renal ultrasounds when there's a concern about certain types of kidney or bladder problems. Renal ultrasound tests can show:</p> <ul> <li>the size of the kidneys</li> <li>signs of injury to the kidneys</li> <li>abnormalities present since birth</li> <li>the presence of blockages or <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidney-stones.html/">kidney stones</a></li> <li>complications of a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/">urinary tract infection (UTI)</a></li> <li>cysts or tumors</li> </ul> <h3>Preparation</h3> <p>Usually, you don't have to do anything special to prepare for a renal ultrasound, although the doctor may ask that your child not eat or drink anything for several hours before the test. Sometimes a renal ultrasound needs a child to have a full bladder; in this case, the doctor will give specific instructions on what to do.</p> <p>You should tell the technician about any medicines your child is taking before the test begins.</p> <h3>Procedure</h3> <p>The renal ultrasound will be done in the radiology department of a hospital or in a radiology center. Parents are usually able to accompany their child to provide reassurance and support. Your child will be asked to change into a cloth gown and lie on a table. The room is usually dark so the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen.</p> <p>A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging will spread a clear, warm gel on your child's abdomen over the kidney area. This gel helps with the transmission of the sound waves. The technician will then move a small wand (transducer) over the gel. The transducer emits high-frequency sound waves and a computer measures how the sound waves bounce back from inside the body. The computer changes those sound waves into images to be analyzed.</p> <p>Sometimes a doctor will come in at the end of the test to meet your child and take a few more pictures. The procedure usually takes less than 30 minutes.</p> <p><img name="881-112608USCLOSEUPRD3.GIF" class="right" alt="closeUp_ultrasound_illustration" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/closeUpUltrasound-400x343-rd1-enIL.gif" title="closeUp_ultrasound_illustration" /></p> <h3>What to Expect</h3> <p>The renal ultrasound test is painless. Your child may feel a slight pressure on the abdomen as the transducer is moved over it. You'll need to tell your child to lie still during the procedure so the sound waves can reach the area effectively. The technician may ask your child to lie in different positions or hold his or her breath briefly.</p> <p>Babies might cry in the ultrasound room, especially if they're restrained, but this won't interfere with the procedure.</p> <p><img name="871-111308ULTRARD6.GIF" class="right" alt="ultrasound_illustration" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/ultrasound-400x476-rd1-enIL.gif" title="ultrasound_illustration" /></p> <h3>Getting the Results</h3> <p>A radiologist (a doctor who is specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray and ultrasound images) will interpret the ultrasound results and then give the information to the doctor. You and your doctor will go over the results. If the test results appear abnormal, your doctor may order further tests.</p> <p>In an emergency, the results of an ultrasound can be available within a short period of time. Otherwise, results are usually ready in 1-2 days. In most cases, results can't be given directly to the patient or family at the time of the test.</p> <h3>Risks</h3> <p>No risks are associated with a renal ultrasound. Unlike X-rays, radiation isn't involved with this test.</p> <h3>Helping Your Child</h3> <p>Some younger children may be afraid of the machinery used for the ultrasound test. Explaining in simple terms how the renal ultrasound test will be conducted and why it's being done can help ease your child's fears. You can tell your child that the equipment takes pictures of his or her kidneys.</p> <p>Encourage your child to ask the technician questions and to try to relax during the procedure, as tense muscles can make it more difficult to get accurate results.</p> <h3>If You Have Questions</h3> <p>If you have questions about the renal ultrasound, speak with your doctor. You can also talk to the technician before the exam.</p>
CAT Scan: AbdomenAn abdominal CAT scan can detect inflammation, infection, injury or disease in the liver, spleen, kidneys, bladder, stomach, bowel, pancreas, adrenal glands, blood vessels, and lymph nodes.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cat-scan-abdomen.html/02052f6e-f7e9-4b4b-9137-962383382e40
GlomerulonephritisGlomerulonephritis happens when tiny filtering units in the kidneys stop working properly. Most cases get better on their own or with treatment.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/glomerulonephritis.html/18feaf09-b1c5-40e8-8bdb-ffa78db188b9
Kidney Diseases in ChildhoodThe kidneys play a critical role in health. When something goes wrong, it could indicate a kidney disease. What are kidney diseases, and how can they be treated?https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidney-diseases-childhood.html/ce75e066-a9e8-498f-97e8-6459154b9748
Kidney StonesKidney stones mostly happen to adults, but sometimes kids and teens can get them. Find out what kidney stones are, how to treat them, and ways to help prevent them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidney-stones.html/715fc04b-38e7-4f13-b64b-a934afe04724
Kidneys and Urinary TractThe bean-shaped kidneys, each about the size of a child's fist, are essential to our health. Their most important role is to filter blood and produce urine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/0cbf3444-1a45-4512-9af9-bc76e5592336
Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related ConditionsRecurrent urinary tract infections can cause kidney damage if left untreated, especially in kids under age 6. Here's how to recognize the symptom of UTIs and get help for your child.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/recurrent-uti-infections.html/879c8981-5f68-4043-9679-090edaf99dc9
Ultrasound: AbdomenDoctors order abdominal ultrasounds when they're concerned about symptoms such as abdominal pain, repeated vomiting, abnormal liver or kidney function tests, or a swollen belly.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ultrasound-abdomen.html/33055ca9-f928-4031-a2c2-190faf1cbabe
Ultrasound: BladderDoctors order bladder ultrasounds when there's a concern about bladder problems, such as difficulty urinating or daytime wetting.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ultrasound-bladder.html/62b31da4-cda0-493f-a393-338578c464d9
Urinary Tract InfectionsA urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common reasons that teens visit a doctor. Learn about the symptoms of UTIs, how they're treated, and more in this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/uti.html/a97f6174-4629-4696-b5bc-a461856cdd95
Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in kids. They're easy to treat and usually clear up in a week or so.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/6a6f9f52-f903-4360-877f-dd35d531d84f
Urine Test: 24-Hour Analysis for Kidney StonesThis test can show if certain substances are found at high concentrations in the urine, and might be causing kidney stones.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/analysis-stones.html/76b1d68f-af4f-4dcb-813a-dd3804af3282
Urine Test: CalciumA urine calcium test can help monitor or determine the cause of kidney stones and other kidney diseases, or detect overactivity or underactivity in the parathyroid glands.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-calcium.html/cc750832-0ced-4022-851a-01a1f9928b02
Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR)This problem with the urinary tract causes urine to flow backward from the bladder to the kidneys. Most cases can be treated effectively, and many kids outgrow the condition.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/vesicoureteral-reflux.html/78339e78-b7bf-4215-900c-bbc7ffef06ab
Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG)A VCUG can help evaluate the bladder's size and shape, and look for problems, such as a blockage. It can also show whether pee is moving in the right direction.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-vcug.html/e8d299b3-efa8-422a-8465-14354e125589
Wilms TumorWilms tumor is a cancer of the kidneys that usually affects newborns and the very young. Fortunately, most kids with Wilms tumor survive and go on to live normal, healthy lives.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/wilms.html/04155d1b-c25f-435e-b430-877088037392
Your KidneysYou need at least one kidney to live. Find out why in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/kidneys.html/e8b731bd-422b-4032-952a-5f2223257f23
Your Urinary SystemYou pee every day, but what makes it happen? Find out in this article for kids about the urinary system.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/pee.html/6715ddc0-cd8e-428a-afd4-e3e3db22267f
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-radiologyAndMedicalImagingkh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-radiologyAndMedicalImagingManaging Health Carehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cerebralpalsy-center/cp-healthcare/c3441eff-b2e9-402b-a9e4-caa7dd66cae4Medical Tests & Examshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/medical/b5327501-2bda-444b-8df1-a1af15af79cbhttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/closeUpUltrasound-400x343-rd1-enIL.gifhttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/ultrasound-400x476-rd1-enIL.gif