Proton Therapy for Cancerenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/Proton_Therapy_for_Cancer_enHD_2.jpgProton therapy is an advanced type of radiation therapy. It's an effective treatment for many childhood cancers.proton beam therapy, proton, protons, proton therapy, cancer, cancer treatments, brain tumors, brain cancer, sarcomas, lymphoma, lymphomas, radiation, cancer therapy, precision medicine, proton therapy, proton therapy for kids with cancer, proton cancer treatment, brain tumors, sarcomas, nervous system cancer, lymphomas04/20/201810/09/201810/09/2018Eric S. Sandler, MD and Danny J. Indelicato, MD06/01/2018acda9533-9f01-40dc-99ef-abc2938bca03https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/proton-therapy.html/<h3>What Is Proton Therapy?</h3> <p>Proton therapy is an advanced type of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/radiation.html/">radiation therapy</a> used to treat some <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cancer.html/">cancers</a>. Its precise delivery of radiation to the tumor site means there is less risk of damage to surrounding healthy tissue.</p> <h3>Why Is Proton Therapy Done?</h3> <p>Proton therapy (also called <strong>proton beam therapy</strong>) is most commonly used to shrink solid tumors that have not spread to other parts of the body. It's an effective treatment for many childhood cancers, including:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/brn-tumors.html/">brain tumors</a></li> <li>sarcomas (cancers that grow in connective tissue )</li> <li>tumors in the head, neck, eyes, and spinal cord</li> <li><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cancer-lymphoma.html/">lymphomas</a> (cancers that affect lymph nodes)</li> </ul> <p>Proton therapy is sometimes used along with other cancer treatments, such as standard radiation, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/chemotherapy.html/">chemotherapy</a>, surgery, and <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/immunotherapy.html/">immunotherapy</a>.</p> <h3>How Does Proton Therapy Work?</h3> <p>Proton therapy uses protons (positively charged particles) instead of X-rays. A special machine speeds up the protons. These high-energy protons can get rid of cancer cells, which makes tumors shrink. Protons are easier to get to a specific location than the X-rays used in standard radiation therapy.</p> <h3>How Is Proton Therapy Different From Radiation Therapy?</h3> <p>The X-ray beams used in standard radiation therapy go beyond the tumor area, sending radiation to healthy areas. This may damage healthy tissue or organs near the tumor.</p> <p>Proton energy sends higher doses of radiation to the exact tumor site. This helps doctors control and manage cancer while greatly reducing damage to healthy tissue and vital organs.</p> <h3>What Should We Expect From Proton Therapy?</h3> <p>Proton therapy treatment usually takes about 6–8 weeks, with daily weekday visits that last about 30–45 minutes. Most of the time is spent getting the child into the right position for the treatment.</p> <p>Proton therapy treatment is painless, and doesn't require a hospital stay. Children under 6 years old might need to get <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/anesthesia-types.html/">general anesthesia</a> to keep them completely still during the treatment.</p> <h3>Are There Any Risks From Proton Therapy?</h3> <p>Because proton therapy targets cancer cells so precisely, it's an excellent treatment option for children with some types of cancer. There's less damage to healthy, developing cells, so there are fewer <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/side-effects.html/">side effects</a>. This also minimizes <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/late-effects.html/">late effects</a> — these are long-term side effects, such as learning disabilities, hearing loss, and other problems.</p> <p>When side effects during therapy do happen, they are usually very mild and can include:</p> <ul> <li>tiredness</li> <li>skin irritation</li> <li>hair loss at the treatment site</li> </ul> <h3>What Else Should I Know?</h3> <p>Proton therapy is not available at all cancer treatment centers because it uses very expensive specialized equipment. If doctors recommend proton therapy for your child, be sure to talk with your insurance provider to see what is covered.</p>Terapia de protones contra el cáncerLa terapia de protones es un tipo de radioterapia avanzada que se usa para tratar algunos cánceres. La aplicación precisa de la radiación en el lugar del tumor significa que existen menos riesgos de daños en el tejido sano que lo rodea.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/proton-therapy-esp.html/ae439cb0-5512-4c15-963a-5a200c7016d1
Brain TumorsBrain tumors are the second most common group of childhood cancers. Treatment requires a very specialized plan involving a team of medical specialists.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/brn-tumors.html/ff2bd11c-a3d8-4bb3-bb58-edd97dd13a31
Brain and Nervous System CancersThese cancers are the most common type of cancer in children. When discovered early, they often can be cured.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/brain-tumors.html/527c1203-9898-45b5-8dba-3de70f76df5d
Cancer BasicsGet the basics on cancer and cancer treatments in this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/cancer.html/80768a55-ae26-44d5-82a5-675138383191
Cancer CenterFrom treatments and prevention to coping with the emotional aspects of cancer, the Cancer Center provides comprehensive information that parents need.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/cancer-center.html/92fcdf56-6935-42ac-a953-9eaf5f96fe2f
ChemotherapyChemotherapy is a big word for treatment with medicines used to help people who have cancer. This medicine kills the cancer cells that are making the person sick.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/chemo.html/8c03a04e-e4b5-47b3-8476-20d45619a51f
Childhood CancerDifferent kinds of childhood cancer have different signs, symptoms, treatments, and outcomes. But today, most kids with cancer get better.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cancer.html/fb37fd75-d961-43c2-b963-ef6f60486038
Coping With Cosmetic Effects of Cancer TreatmentIt's normal for kids to have hair loss, skin changes, or weight gain during treatment. This article offers tips for helping kids feel better about their appearance.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cosmetic-effects.html/901f4716-eb3c-4ce8-a36c-e60d8f586450
Dealing With CancerIt's unusual for teens to have cancer, but it can happen. The good news is that most will survive and return to their everyday lives. Learn about how to cope if you or someone you know has cancer.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/deal-with-cancer.html/7bc989fa-70dd-47d8-8c21-c5359f1dca38
Effects of Cancer Treatment on FertilityWhile some cancer treatments have little to no effect on reproductive health, others are more likely cause temporary or permanent infertility.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cancer-fertility.html/3b409a23-6f4e-47f5-9d9e-63ac4fed8be9
HepatoblastomaHepatoblastoma is a rare type of cancer that affects the liver but rarely spreads beyond it. Most cases are in children younger than 3. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hepatoblastoma.html/957c6476-0139-4721-ab32-d9d75d2265b2
Late Effects of Cancer and Cancer TreatmentLong-term side effects, or late effects, happen to many cancer survivors. With early diagnosis and proper follow-up care, most late effects can be treated or cured.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/late-effects.html/4f0ec7e2-6a0d-4c67-b4e7-f6e15de2816d
Liver TumorsTumors happen when cells form a mass or growth. Liver tumors can be benign (not cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/liver-tumors.html/ef61411a-f830-4846-a20f-56ac5e49076b
Radiation TherapyMore than half of all people with cancer are treated with radiation therapy. Get the facts on radiation therapy, including what it is, what to expect, and how to cope with side effects.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/radiation.html/4711ccb7-ee19-41a4-810b-938ce9b88a7b
Side Effects of Chemotherapy and RadiationSide effects of cancer treatment can include flu-like symptoms, hair loss, and blood clotting problems. After treatment ends, most side effects go away.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/side-effects.html/96a6771c-22f7-4b52-ae6b-6aa9487bc738
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-radiologyAndMedicalImagingkh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-oncologyCancer & Tumorshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/medical/cancer/088d4c52-cd61-4cca-af46-82de410d892aCancer Treatment & Preventionhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cancer-center/treatment/9b82611a-8da8-4937-991c-407024862b68