Basic Blood Chemistry Testsenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-bloodTest-enHD-AR1.jpgDoctors order basic blood chemistry tests to assess a wide range of conditions and the function of organs.blood tests, electrolytes, lytes, blood chemistries, sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, k, cl, hco3, na, serum, body functions, veins, needles, white cells, red cells, platelets, bloodstream, cbc, salts, electrical systems, minerals, brains, muscles, hearts, electricity, bun, blood urea nitrogen, glucose, sugar, gi tract, gastrointestinal tract, creatinine, proteins, muscle tissues, muscular dystrophy, livers, kidneys, metabolism, starches, dehydration, diabetes, hyperglycemias, hypoglycemias, insulins, injections, blood glucose levels, alcohol prep pads, sterilization, needle-stick, drawing blood, test results, phlebotomists, CD1Pathology03/22/200007/26/201909/02/2019KidsHealth Medical Expertse40eaa28-5011-4492-8c05-0c36af25989ahttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/labtest5.html/ <p>Doctors order basic blood chemistry tests to assess many conditions and learn how the body&rsquo;s organs are working.</p> <p>Often, blood tests check electrolytes, the minerals that help keep the body's fluid levels in balance and which are necessary to help the muscles, heart, and other organs work properly. Blood chemistry tests also measure other substances that help show how well <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/">the kidneys</a> are working and how well the body is absorbing sugars.</p> <h3>Tests for Electrolytes</h3> <p>Typically, tests for electrolytes measure levels of sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate in the body.</p> <p><strong>Sodium</strong> plays a major role in regulating the amount of water in the body. Also, the passage of sodium in and out of cells is necessary for many body functions, like transmitting electrical signals in the brain and in the muscles. The sodium levels are measured to detect whether there's the right balance of sodium and liquid in the blood to carry out those functions.</p> <p>If a child becomes <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dehydration.html/">dehydrated</a> (from <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/vomit.html/">vomiting</a>, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/diarrhea.html/">diarrhea</a>, or other causes), the sodium levels can be too high or low, which can cause confusion, weakness, lethargy, and even <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seizure.html/">seizures</a>.</p> <p><strong>Potassium</strong> is essential to regulating how the heart beats. Potassium levels that are too high or too low can increase the risk of an abnormal heartbeat (also called <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/arrhythmias.html/">arrhythmias</a>). Low potassium levels are also associated with muscle weakness and cramps.</p> <p><strong>Chloride</strong>, like sodium, helps maintain a balance of fluids in the body. Certain medical problems like dehydration, heart disease, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidney-diseases-childhood.html/">kidney disease</a>, or other illnesses can disrupt the balance of chloride. Testing chloride in these situations helps the doctor tell whether an acid-base imbalance is happening in the body.</p> <p><strong>Bicarbonate</strong> prevents the body's tissues from getting too much or too little acid. The kidney and lungs balance the levels of bicarbonate in the body. So if bicarbonate levels are too high or low, it might indicate a problem with those organs.</p> <h3>Other Substances Measured</h3> <p>Other blood substances measured in the basic blood chemistry test include blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, which tell how well the kidneys are functioning, and glucose, which indicates whether there is a normal amount of sugar in the blood.</p> <p><strong>Blood urea nitrogen (BUN)</strong> is a measure of how well the kidneys are working. Urea is a nitrogen-containing waste product that's created when the body breaks down protein. If the kidneys are not working properly, the levels of BUN will build up in the blood. Dehydration, excessive bleeding, and severe infection leading to shock&nbsp;also can raise BUN levels.</p> <p><strong>Creatinine</strong> levels in the blood that are too high can indicate that the kidneys aren't working properly. The kidneys filter and excrete creatinine; if they're not working as they should, creatinine can build up in the bloodstream. Both dehydration and muscle damage also can raise creatinine levels.</p> <p><strong>Glucose</strong> is the main type of sugar in the blood. It comes from the foods we eat and is the major source of energy needed to fuel the body's functions. Glucose levels that are too high or too low can cause problems. The most common cause of high blood glucose levels is <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/diabetes-center.html/">diabetes</a>. Other medical conditions and some medicines also can cause high blood glucose.</p>
Blood Test (Video)These videos show what's involved in getting a blood test and what it's like to be the person taking the blood sample.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/video-bldtest.html/267eef2d-8579-44db-adcb-641db49d0ec0
Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP)A basic metabolic panel (BMP), commonly ordered as part of routine medical exam, is a set of blood tests that gives information about sugar (glucose) and calcium levels, kidney function, and electrolyte and fluid balance.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/blood-test-bmp.html/d899bdac-ae4f-4205-90b1-756fd8a20d93
Blood Test: Complete Blood CountThis common blood test helps doctors gather information about a person's blood cells and how they're working. Find out why doctors do this test and what's involved for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-cbc.html/6843c50f-dc8a-4b78-8fc7-50f34942c2d7
Blood Test: Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)A comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) blood test helps evaluate kidney and liver function, sugar (glucose) and protein levels in the blood, and electrolyte and fluid balance.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/blood-test-cmp.html/63a5f98b-1fdf-49ae-b171-df6d35d43cde
Blood Test: GlucoseThe blood glucose test, which measures the amount of sugar in the blood, may be done as part of a routine physical or to help diagnose diabetes.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-glucose.html/ca91bc44-6e9e-49c3-a43f-c13ea3e042ef
Blood Test: PhosphorusA phosphorus test looks at levels of phosphorus in a person's blood. Find out why doctors do this test and what's involved for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-phosphorus.html/10009d64-eaa4-485a-afd7-6349e0953e24
Definition: Blood Glucose LevelThe blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/glucose-level.html/ce9cff76-5f02-4359-996b-616430ea6e05
Definition: GlucoseGlucose is the main type of sugar in the blood and is the major source of energy for the body's cells.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/glucose.html/55ebcded-0295-47a5-b8a8-982291755f4f
Getting a Blood Test (Video)A blood test might sound scary, but it usually takes less than a minute. Watch what happens in this video for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/video-bldtest.html/13ac3212-6f5c-4741-8827-24b1c5a9549e
Kidneys and Urinary TractThe bean-shaped kidneys, each about the size of a child's fist, are essential to our health. Their most important role is to filter blood and produce urine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/0cbf3444-1a45-4512-9af9-bc76e5592336
Urine Test: CreatinineLow levels of creatinine in the urine may point to a kidney disease, certain muscular and neuromuscular disorders, or an obstruction of the urinary tract.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-creatinine.html/586c349c-6288-462d-9100-d3a28ed3a21f
Urine Test: Microalbumin-to-Creatinine RatioThe microalbumin-to-creatinine ratio test is most commonly used to screen for kidney problems in teens with diabetes. It may also be used to monitor kidney function in kids and teens who have a kidney disease.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-mtc-ratio.html/554b1e12-bf11-4df3-a35f-e4ce2aaa9a23
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-generalPediatricskh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-palliativeCareMedical Testshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/infections/medical/4ef0ca68-0b7b-4b35-86e2-7723d0205599Caring for Your Childhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hearthealth/livingheartcond/a5caa6fd-b063-42fe-933e-6802d2bf0897Managing Health Carehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cerebralpalsy-center/cp-healthcare/c3441eff-b2e9-402b-a9e4-caa7dd66cae4Sick Kidshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/general/sick/3c1c9be2-f915-4f76-baac-ad2943a5a8e6Medical Tests & Examshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/medical/b5327501-2bda-444b-8df1-a1af15af79cb