A to Z: Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsyenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgKids and teens with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) have multiple seizures that usually start around puberty and continue into adulthood unless the seizures are controlled by medicine.juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, JME, seizures, tonic, clonic, seize, jerks, jerking, shake, shaking, seizure disorder, epileptic, fit, petit mal, grand mal, spasm, Janz03/02/201609/17/201909/17/20190dfa7dd5-f888-4e7c-81f6-0547091bbf24https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/jme.html/<p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/"><img class="right" title="Parents image" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-atoZDictionary-enBT.jpg" alt="A to Z Dictionary 500 Go" /></a></p> <p><em>May also be called: JME; Adolescent Myoclonic Epilepsy; Janz Syndrome</em></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;"><a href="http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/epilepsy.html" style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #0099ff; font-stretch: normal; font-size: 12.16px; line-height: 1.35em; text-decoration: none; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;">Epilepsy</a><span style="font-size: 12.16px; line-height: 17.024px;">&nbsp;is a&nbsp;</span><a href="http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/seizure.html" style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #0099ff; font-stretch: normal; font-size: 12.16px; line-height: 1.35em; text-decoration: none; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;">seizure</a><span style="font-size: 12.16px; line-height: 17.024px;">&nbsp;disorder where electrical signals in the brain misfire, causing temporary communication problems between nerve cells. Someone who gets repeated seizures is thought to have epilepsy.&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">Kids and teens with <strong>juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME)</strong> have multiple seizures that usually start around puberty and continue into adulthood unless the seizures are controlled by medicine.</span></p> <h3><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">More to Know</span></h3> <p>People with JME may have different kinds of seizures. The most common are called myoclonic jerks, in which a person can have quick jerks in the arms, legs, or shoulders, often just one one side of the body. &nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;"><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-seizure-petit.html/">Absence seizures</a> (previously called petit mal seizures) can cause rapid blinking or a few seconds of staring into space.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;"><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-tonic.html/">Tonic-clonic seizures</a> (previously called grand mal seizures) can make a person lose consciousness, fall to the ground, and have full body muscle jerks or spasms. &nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;"><em>Tonic</em> means the muscles in the body become stiff. <em>Clonic</em> refers to periods of shaking or jerking in parts on the body. <em>Myoclonic</em> means brief jerking in parts of the body.</span></p> <h3><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">Keep in Mind</span></h3> <p>Seizures can be triggered by a lack of sleep, extreme tiredness, stress, or alcohol consumption. Managing triggers and taking medicine can help prevent seizures for most people with JME.</p> <p><em><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</span></em></p>
A to Z Symptom: SeizureSeizures can be frightening, but most last only a few minutes and stop on their own.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-symptoms-seizure.html/0fb8f7f2-36d8-4bb6-bafd-2424f9df6652
A to Z: Seizure, Tonic-ClonicA tonic-clonic seizure (also called a grand mal seizure) is a sudden attack that brings on intense muscle spasms and loss of consciousness. It is caused by abnormal brain activity and affects the entire body.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-seizure-grand-mal.html/4a629ff8-4dad-436f-82fe-5a20153bd666
Brain and Nervous SystemIf the brain is a central computer that controls all the functions of the body, then the nervous system is like a network that relays messages back and forth to different parts of the body. Find out how they work in this Body Basics article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/brain-nervous-system.html/cf28c686-fa8f-42b5-8561-a79ea70cf18c
EpilepsySeizures are a common symptom of epilepsy, a condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Learn all about epilepsy, including what to do if you see someone having a seizure.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/epilepsy.html/85df049a-dc59-41a5-b92c-421ea2d711be
Epilepsy Factsheet (for Schools)What teachers should know about epilepsy, and what they can do to help students with the condition succeed in school.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/epilepsy-factsheet.html/83a2f877-3f5b-41d4-949f-1e24584cfabc
Knowing Your Child's Medical HistoryIn an emergency, health care professionals will have many questions about a patient's medical history. It's easy to compile this information now, and it could save critical minutes later.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/medhist.html/f6063f6a-56b4-4bb2-8d8c-ef9641fc25fb
SeizuresSeizures are caused by a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain. Find out what you need to know about seizures and what to do if your child has one.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seizure.html/17184860-dea1-4cd4-95ba-3cf34539cd44
Your Brain & Nervous SystemYour brain is the boss of your body and runs the whole show. Learn more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/brain.html/e7546b11-3aa5-4186-b323-c053d4140274
kh:age-teenThirteenToNineteenkh:clinicalDesignation-neurologykh:genre-articlekh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-neurologyJhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/j/63c52edc-57aa-4d0b-bcf5-4d2db9e3725fhttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-atoZDictionary-enBT.jpg