Intractable Epilepsyenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/Intractable_Epilepsy_enHD_1.jpgIntractable epilepsy is when a child's seizures can't be controlled by medicines. Doctors may recommend surgery or other treatments for intractable seizures.epilepsy, epileptic, types of epilepsy, Intractable Epilepsy, intractable, seizure, seizures, uncontrolled epilepsy, uncontrolled seizures, kids with epilepsy, my child has epilepsy08/22/201709/17/201909/17/2019KidsHealth Medical Experts08/05/2017b8735f52-1cd8-4dc4-9c1e-b0af479bdac5https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/intractable-epilepsy.html/<h3>What Is Intractable Epilepsy?</h3> <p>Intractable <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/epilepsy.html/">epilepsy</a> is when seizures can't be controlled by medicines. (Intractable means "not easily managed or relieved.") It's also called refractory, uncontrolled, or drug-resistant epileptic seizures.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em;">About 1 in 3 of people with epilepsy have intractable <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seizure.html/">seizures</a>.</span></p> <h3><span style="font-size: 1em;">What Happens in Intractable Epilepsy?</span></h3> <p>Intractable epilepsy happens when the medicine prescribed for a seizure type doesn't work, stops working, or causes severe side effects that make it difficult to use.&nbsp;</p> <h3><span style="font-size: 1em;">Who Gets Intractable Epilepsy?</span></h3> <p>Intractable epilepsy is common in kids who have <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/infantile-spasms.html/">infantile spasms</a>, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/lennox-gastaut-syndrome.html/">Lennox-Gastaut syndrome</a>, or, less often, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/juvenile-myoclonic-epilepsy.html/">juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME)</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em;">Seizures caused by tumors, scarring from brain injury, or lack of oxygen also can be intractable.</span></p> <h3><span style="font-size: 1em;">How Is Intractable Epilepsy Diagnosed?</span></h3> <p>Intractable epilepsy usually is diagnosed after three carefully chosen, safe medicines don't completely control the seizures. The chances of a fourth medicine working are very low, so doctors will diagnose intractability at this point.</p> <h3><span style="font-size: 1em;">How Is Intractable Epilepsy Treated?</span></h3> <p>When medicines do not prevent a child's seizures, doctors may recommend a special diet, like the high-fat, low-carbohydrate <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ketogenic-diet.html/">ketogenic diet</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em;">Sometimes they recommend <strong>vagal nerve stimulation (VNS)</strong>. In VNS, an implanted device (a stimulator) sends mild pulses of electrical energy to the brain through the vagus nerve.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em;"><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/epilepsy-surgery.html/">Epilepsy surgery</a> might be an option for about half of children with intractable epilepsy. Most of them can benefit significantly from surgery.</span></p> <h3><span style="font-size: 1em;">How Can I Help My Child?</span></h3> <p>Talk to your doctor to see what treatments are available for your child. Make sure your child takes medicines as prescribed and avoids known seizure triggers, such as lack of sleep, antihistamine use, or excessive <a class="kh_anchor">stress</a>.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em;">Always tell the doctor if you think a medicine isn't working or you don't notice any improvement. This helps the doctor give your child the best possible care.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1em;">It's important to keep your child safe during a seizure. So make sure that other adults and caregivers (family members, babysitters, teachers, coaches, etc.) know <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seizures-sheet.html/">what to do</a>.</span></p>Epilepsia intratableLa epilepsia intratable es cuando las convulsiones no se pueden controlar mediante medicamentos. Aproximadamente una de cada tres personas con epilepsia tiene crisis convulsivas no tratables. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/intractable-epilepsy-esp.html/5033226e-fd13-48df-bed5-971b06b451ef
EpilepsySeizures are a common symptom of epilepsy, a condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Learn all about epilepsy, including what to do if you see someone having a seizure.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/epilepsy.html/85df049a-dc59-41a5-b92c-421ea2d711be
Epilepsy Factsheet (for Schools)What teachers should know about epilepsy, and what they can do to help students with the condition succeed in school.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/epilepsy-factsheet.html/83a2f877-3f5b-41d4-949f-1e24584cfabc
Epilepsy SurgeryEpilepsy surgery is an operation done on the brain to reduce or stop seizures.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/epilepsy-surgery.html/62a50c44-d6c5-44e2-b4d2-697d4d8aa46c
First Aid: SeizuresAlthough seizures can be frightening, usually they last only a few minutes, stop on their own, and are almost never life-threatening.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seizures-sheet.html/b5b828f7-d921-49cf-9b8a-79401d2378e9
Infantile SpasmsInfantile spasms (IS) is a seizure disorder in babies. The spasms usually go away by age 4, but many babies with IS will have other kinds of epilepsy later.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/infantile-spasms.html/690f06dd-3b84-48f3-8549-838fb4c9bdcd
Juvenile Myoclonic EpilepsyKids with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) have one or more of several different kinds of seizures, which begin around the age of puberty.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/juvenile-myoclonic-epilepsy.html/f594267f-fabd-48e1-95b8-45e3483b107a
Lennox-Gastaut SyndromeLennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a seizure disorder. Children with LGS have several different kinds of seizures.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/lennox-gastaut-syndrome.html/f8ee7add-7856-4bc1-ab1a-33a0acd90bd3
SeizuresSeizures are caused by a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain. Find out what you need to know about seizures and what to do if your child has one.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seizure.html/17184860-dea1-4cd4-95ba-3cf34539cd44
Word! SeizureYou might hear a seizure called a convulsion, fit, or spell.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/word-seizure.html/70e445af-ba78-41bd-94f7-293962fa407b
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-neurologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-neurologyBrain & Nervous Systemhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/medical/brain/d6b00a11-9db0-403c-bc41-00bcdf022537