How to Give an Insulin Injectionenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-insulinInject-enHD-AR1.jpgThis step-by-step graphic shows how to give an insulin injection.insulin injections, insulin, injections, shots, giving a shot, diabetes09/02/200502/27/201802/27/2018Steven Dowshen, MD02/23/201801218152-e238-406e-8b26-21a07212e681https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/injection-graphic.html/<p class="center_this"><img src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/howInsulinInjection_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>1. Get the supplies you'll need:</p> <ul> <li>insulin bottle</li> <li>syringe</li> <li>alcohol swabs</li> <li>container for the used syringe</li> </ul> <p>2. Wash your hands.</p> <p>3. Check the insulin bottle to make sure it hasn't expired.</p> <p>4. Remove the lid from the insulin bottle.</p> <p>5. Wipe the rubber top of the bottle with an alcohol swab.</p> <p>6. Remove the cap from the syringe.</p> <p class="center_this"><img src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step1Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>Pull air into the syringe by pulling back on the plunger until its black tip is even with the line showing the dose you'll need.</p> <p><em>Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.</em></p> <p class="center_this"><img src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step2Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>Push the needle through the rubber top of the bottle.</p> <p class="center_this"><img src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step3Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>Push the plunger so that the air goes from the syringe into the bottle.</p> <p><em>Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.</em></p> <p class="center_this"><img src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step4Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>Turn the insulin bottle and syringe upside down. To pull insulin into the syringe, slowly pull back on the plunger until the top of its black tip is even with the line showing your dose.</p> <p class="center_this"><img src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step5Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>The most common places to inject insulin are the abdomen (belly), the back of the upper arms, the upper buttocks, and the outer thighs. Choose a place to make the injection, and wipe the skin with an alcohol swab.</p> <p><em>Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.</em></p> <p class="center_this"><img src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step6insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>Gently pinch the skin. Hold the syringe at a 90-degree angle to the skin, and push the needle all the way in.</p> <p class="center_this"><img src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step7Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>Let go of the pinched skin, and slowly push the plunger to inject all of the insulin. Wait about 5 seconds before pulling out the needle. Don't just put the used syringe in the trash. Instead, put it in a plastic or metal container with a tight lid. When the container is full, be sure the lid is closed and put it in the trash.</p> <p><em>Note: This information is for educational purposes only. For specific guidance on giving an insulin injection, talk with your doctor.</em></p>Cómo aplicar una inyección de insulinaCómo aplicar una inyección de insulina.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/injection-graphic-esp.html/e8241026-f963-4aba-ae3b-35f300f792b8
Blood Glucose RecordIf your child has diabetes, you can use this printable sheet to record his or her blood glucose levels.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/glucose-record.html/0245e739-6b0e-44e9-aaad-0002ca04eabc
Chandler's Diabetes StoryPeople who have diabetes have to pay special attention to what they eat and need to stay aware of the amount of sugar in their blood. So what's it like to have diabetes? Just ask Chandler!https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/chandler-diabetes-story.html/c6b4886c-e394-4dd7-9a9d-8c28e7bb1b4a
Definition: Insulin InjectionsAlthough researchers are testing other ways to give insulin, it's only available now in a form that must be injected just under the skin.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/insulin-injections.html/dd251f89-b869-4f9a-893c-4457842c6acd
Diabetes CenterDiabetes means a problem with insulin, an important hormone in the body. Find out how children with diabetes can stay healthy and do the normal stuff kids like to do.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/center/diabetes-center.html/0767277a-98f9-4541-b2f6-f3c68f43a94c
Diabetes Control: Why It's ImportantKeeping blood sugar levels under control can help keep you healthy and prevent health problems from happening down the road. Find out more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/diabetes-control.html/5ec43be3-261e-4e07-b64b-831ea38c9fbf
Helping Kids Deal With Injections and Blood TestsBlood tests and insulin injections can be a challenge for kids with diabetes and their parents. Here are some strategies for coping with these necessary procedures.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/injections-tests.html/bbbd4d7c-63f1-4329-8e1f-9dbb2be678c0
How to Give an Insulin InjectionThis step-by-step graphic shows how to give an insulin injection.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/injection-graphic.html/07c151b3-b613-4885-a3b9-0f213ef80a28
Hyperglycemia and Diabetic KetoacidosisWhen blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. A major goal in controlling diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels as close to the desired range as possible.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hyperglycemia.html/604daaa3-061f-4de7-adef-81dfb8478b52
HypoglycemiaWhen blood glucose levels drop too low, it's called hypoglycemia. Very low blood sugar levels can cause severe symptoms that require immediate treatment.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hypoglycemia.html/a5a7783c-d631-4896-baa4-6f28cc0d82bd
Medicines for DiabetesWhether your child is taking insulin or pills (or both) to control diabetes, it's important to learn how diabetes medicines work.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/diabetes-medicines.html/25c33c76-8aa8-4ebc-a982-4c9d87dcb9b8
Word! Insulin InjectionsInsulin is an important hormone that keeps your body working. If a person doesn't make enough of this substance, he or she may need to get insulin injections.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/word-insulin-injections.html/e0170d94-8adc-47ce-8272-d0e698caf48b
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-endocrinologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-endocrinologyDiabetes Medications & Monitoringhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/diabetes-center/meds-monitoring/bc69633f-1218-41d1-b832-66b2e63b4c18https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/howInsulinInjection_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpghttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step1Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpghttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step2Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpghttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step3Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpghttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step4Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpghttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step5Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpghttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step6insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpghttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/step7Insulin_400x400_rd1_enIL.jpg