Idiopathic Scoliosisenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/Idiopathic_Scoliosis_enHD_1.jpgKids of any age can have idiopathic scoliosis, but it's usually found when a child begins going through puberty. Find out more about the signs of and treatment for idiopathic scoliosis.scoliosis, spine, curve, vertebra, vertebrae, bone, bones, back, brace, spinal fusion, surgery, forward bend, test, orthopedic, 07/14/201705/10/201909/02/2019Suken A. Shah, MD and Alicia McCarthy, APRN07/21/201731d29b22-af4f-4581-b9b1-c25dd065d53fhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/idiopathic-scoliosis.html/<h3>What Is Idiopathic Scoliosis?</h3> <p>People with <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/scoliosis.html/">scoliosis</a> have a side-to-side curve in the spine that can look like an &quot;S&quot; or a &quot;C.&quot; In addition, some of the bones (vertebrae) in the back can rotate, making the spine twist.</p> <p>Small curves usually don't cause problems. But a curve that gets worse can cause pain and health problems. Very large curves can damage the joints, causing back pain or arthritis of the spine. If the spine curves a lot, people might get lung problems.</p> <p>Kids of any age — even infants — can have idiopathic scoliosis. But it's usually found when a child begins going through puberty.</p> <h3>What Causes Idiopathic Scoliosis?</h3> <p>Idiopathic scoliosis is a bit of a medical mystery. No one knows for sure why kids get it, but research shows that it runs in families.</p> <p>Idiopathic scoliosis isn't caused by things like carrying a heavy backpack, bad posture, playing sports — or anything else kids might do. Kids don't have control over whether they get scoliosis. It's in their <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/about-genetics.html/">genes</a>.</p> <h3>What Are the Signs &amp;Symptoms of Scoliosis?</h3> <p>Sometimes scoliosis is easy to see. A curve in the spine can make the body tilt to the left or right. Kids might look like they are leaning to one side. Some kids might have one shoulder higher than the other or one shoulder blade that sticks out more than the other. If the spine is twisted, one side of the ribcage might stick out more when a child bends over.</p> <p><img class="center_this" title="A comparison of a normal spine, which is straight, and an &quot;ess&quot; shaped curve in a spine with scoliosis." src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/scoliosisCroppedA-415x233-enIL.png" alt="A comparison of a normal spine, which is straight, and an &quot;ess&quot; shaped curve in a spine with scoliosis." /></p> <p>Often, scoliosis isn't obvious. That's why health care providers do a scoliosis exam as part of a child's regular <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/checkups.html/">checkup</a>. Some states have school-based scoliosis screening programs.</p> <h3>How Is Scoliosis Diagnosed?</h3> <p>If you think your child has scoliosis, make an appointment with your health care provider. Because idiopathic scoliosis can run in families, the care provider will ask questions about your medical history &nbsp;to help make a diagnosis.</p> <p>The health care provider will examine your child, and may refer you to an orthopedic specialist. These experts treat diseases of the bones and muscles. They see lots of kids with scoliosis and can decide if a child needs treatment.</p> <p>Health care providers measure scoliosis curves in degrees:</p> <ul> <li>A <strong>mild</strong> curve is less than 20 degrees.</li> <li>A <strong>moderate</strong> curve is between 25 degrees and 40 degrees.</li> <li>A <strong>severe</strong> curve is more than 50 degrees.</li> </ul> <p>Severe curves can affect the lungs. Orthopedic specialists usually can work with patients to prevent curves from getting to this point.</p> <h3>How Is Scoliosis Treated?</h3> <p>Most mild scoliosis curves don't need treatment. Kids with mild curves do need to go for regular checkups to be sure the curve doesn't get bigger. Scoliosis is more likely to get worse as long as the bones are still growing. So doctors keep an eye on kids, sometimes until they're in their late teens.</p> <p>When doctors think moderate-to-severe curves might get worse or cause problems, they usually want kids to wear a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/scoliosis-brace.html/">back brace</a> until they finish growing. The brace doesn't make an existing curve go away, but it can stop it from getting worse.</p> <p>Kids with severe scoliosis might need surgery.</p> <p>There's no quick fix for scoliosis. Wearing a brace or recovering from surgery takes a while. This can be tough on kids (and parents!). Your care team can put you and your child in touch with other families who have gone through the same thing or help you find support groups.</p> <h4>Back Braces</h4> <p>There are several different types of braces. Because each child's curve is different, the orthopedic specialist will decide on the number of hours a child should wear a brace.</p> <p>The brace acts as a holding device that keeps the curve from getting worse. A brace won't make the spine straight. But if it does its job well, the curve won't get bigger.</p> <p>Scoliosis care teams work with kids to choose the right brace. The right brace is the one that works best for the type of curve a child has. It's also the one a child is most likely to wear. Wearing a brace appropriately can prevent the need for surgery.</p> <h4>Surgery</h4> <p>Some kids with severe scoliosis need a type of surgery called a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/spinal-fusion.html/">spinal fusion</a>. During the operation, an orthopedic surgeon straightens the spine as much as possible and holds it in place with rods and screws. The surgeon then puts in a bone graft to join (fuse) some of the vertebrae together. That way, the curve can't get worse.</p> <p>After about a year, the bones should be fully fused. The metal rods are no longer needed, but stay in the back because they aren't doing any harm and taking them out requires another operation.</p> <h3>Looking Ahead</h3> <p>When treatment is over, kids are able to live full and active lives. As long as people with scoliosis get the right treatment as kids, the spine usually won't continue to curve after they're done growing.</p>Escoliosis idiopáticaLas personas con escoliosis tienen una curvatura lateral en la columna vertebral en forma de "S" o de "C". Además, algunos de los huesos (o vértebras) de la espalda pueden rotar, lo que hace que la columna se tuerza.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/idiopathic-scoliosis-esp.html/754790aa-b514-4070-89bb-4d72d7701d8c
Bones, Muscles, and JointsWithout bones, muscles, and joints, we couldn't stand, walk, run, or even sit. The musculoskeletal system supports our bodies, protects our organs from injury, and enables movement.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/bones-muscles-joints.html/53199934-b6d8-4854-8362-8b1dfc45c3f6
ScoliosisScoliosis makes a person’s spine curve from side to side. Large curves can cause health problems like pain or breathing trouble. Health care providers treat scoliosis with back braces or surgery when needed. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/scoliosis.html/eb1d36eb-b517-42a5-9d47-7903103cdddc
Scoliosis Factsheet (for Schools)What teachers should know about scoliosis, and how to help students with the condition.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/scoliosis-factsheet.html/c34fb526-b0b4-4952-8866-4f627c31d843
Scoliosis: BracingSome teens with scoliosis wear a brace to help stop their curve from getting worse as they grow. Find out more about how scoliosis braces work and how long people wear them in this article for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/scoliosis-brace.html/ba716943-ca06-48a9-bc51-8eeb5dee8cbd
Spinal Fusion SurgeryA spinal fusion is a surgical procedure that's done to stabilize or straighten the bones in the back. It can help some teens with scoliosis.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/spinal-fusion.html/f79333c5-42e3-4000-aafa-b6b5c37d9934
X-Ray Exam: ScoliosisKids with scoliosis have a spine that curves, like an S or a C. If scoliosis is suspected, a doctor may order X-rays to measure the curvature of the spine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/xray-scoliosis.html/629dce49-0a36-4b67-af66-6cc0972e9691
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-generalPediatricskh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-orthopedicsNonSportsMedBones & Muscleshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/medical/bones/309954d5-03dd-446c-9d39-3e66eeb99f97https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/scoliosisCroppedA-415x233-enIL.png