Iron-Deficiency Anemiaenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-ironAnemia-enHD-AR1.jpgIron helps the body carry oxygen in the blood and plays a key role in brain and muscle function. Too little iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.iron deficiency anemia, iron-deficiency anemia, iron deficiency, anemia, low iron stores, poor iron intake, poor diet, nutrition, nutrients, iron supplement, supplementation, breastfeeding, breast-feeding, infant formula, nutritional deficiency, vegetarian, cow's milk, vitamin c, vegetarianism, blood loss, menstruation, feeding your infant, feeding your baby, feeding your toddler, feeding your teen, feeding your adolescent, feeding your child, CD1Blood Bone Marrow Transplant, CD1Hematology07/31/200006/06/201909/02/2019Robin E. Miller, MD06/10/2019b81f3bad-4d4d-4db1-8c26-45affb53c115https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ida.html/<h3>What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia?</h3> <p>Iron-deficiency anemia is <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/anemia.html/">anemia</a> that happens when there isn't enough <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/iron.html/">iron</a> in the body.</p> <p>Someone with anemia has a lower number of red blood cells (RBCs) than usual. RBCs contain hemoglobin, a protein that carries oxygen throughout the body. The body needs iron to make hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin). Without enough iron, less hemoglobin and fewer red blood cells are made, leading to anemia.</p> <p>Treatment with iron supplements usually makes the anemia better.</p> <h3>What Are the Signs &amp; Symptoms of Iron-Deficiency Anemia?</h3> <p>At first, children with iron-deficiency anemia may not have any symptoms. When symptoms do happen, a child might:</p> <ul> <li>look pale</li> <li>seem moody</li> <li>be very tired</li> <li>get tired quickly from exercise</li> <li>feel dizzy or lightheaded</li> <li>have a fast heartbeat</li> <li>have developmental delays and behavioral problems</li> <li>want to eat ice or non-food items (called <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/pica.html/">pica</a>)</li> </ul> <h3>What Causes Iron-Deficiency Anemia?</h3> <p>Iron-deficiency anemia can happen when:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>There's a problem with how the body absorbs iron (such as in <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/celiac-disease.html/">celiac disease</a>).</li> <li>Someone has blood loss from an injury, heavy <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/talk-about-menstruation.html/">menstrual periods</a>, or bleeding inside the intestines.</li> <li>Someone doesn't get enough iron in the diet. This can happen in: <ul> <li>children who drink too much cow's milk, and babies given <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cow-milk.html/">cow's milk</a> before they're 1 year old</li> <li><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/vegetarianism.html/">vegetarians</a> because they don't eat meat, a source of iron</li> <li>breastfed babies who don't get iron supplements</li> <li>babies given formula with low iron</li> <li>babies who were <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/born-early.html/">born early</a> or small who may need more iron than formula or breast milk contains</li> </ul> </li> </ul> <h3>How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Diagnosed?</h3> <p>Doctors usually can diagnose iron-deficiency anemia by:</p> <ul> <li>asking questions about symptoms</li> <li>asking about the diet</li> <li>finding out about the patient's medical history </li> <li>doing a physical exam</li> <li>doing blood tests to: <ul> <li>look at the red blood cells with a microscope</li> <li>check the amount of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/blood-test-hemoglobin.html/">hemoglobin</a> and <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-ferritin.html/">iron</a> in the blood</li> <li>check how fast new RBCs are being made</li> <li>do other blood tests to rule out other types of anemia</li> </ul> </li> </ul> <h3>How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?</h3> <p>Doctors treat iron-deficiency anemia with iron supplements taken as a liquid or pill for at least 3 months. To help iron get absorbed into the body:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Avoid taking iron with antacids, milk, or tea because these interfere with the body's ability to absorb iron.</li> <li>Take iron before eating (unless this causes an upset stomach).</li> </ul> <p>Someone whose anemia is very severe may get iron or a <a class="kh_anchor">blood transfusion</a> through an IV (intravenous) line.</p> <p>When iron-deficiency anemia is caused by something other than a lack of iron in the diet, treatment also may include:</p> <ul> <li>treatments to reduce bleeding in heavy menstrual periods</li> <li>reducing the amount of cow's milk in the diet</li> <li>treating an underlying disease</li> </ul> <h3>How Can Parents Help?</h3> <p>If your child has iron-deficiency anemia:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Make sure your child takes the iron supplements exactly as prescribed.</li> <li>Include iron-rich foods in the family's diet. Good sources of iron include: <ul> <li>iron-fortified cereals</li> <li>lean meat, poultry, and fish</li> <li>tofu</li> <li>egg yolks</li> <li>beans</li> <li>raisins</li> </ul> </li> <li>Serve fruits and vegetables high in vitamin C or a glass of orange juice at mealtimes. This helps the iron get absorbed.</li> <li>Talk to a dietitian or your doctor if your child is a vegetarian. They can recommend foods to help your child get enough iron.</li> </ul> <p>To help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in young children:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Don't give cow's milk to babies under 1 year old.</li> <li>Limit cow's milk in kids over 1 year old to less than 2 cups of milk a day. Giving them more can make them feel full and lower the amount of iron-rich foods they eat.</li> </ul>Anemia por falta de hierroLa anemia por falta de hierro es un tipo de anemia que ocurre cuando el organismo no tiene suficiente hierro. En general, la anemia mejora con un tratamiento con suplementos de hierro. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/ida-esp.html/50af587c-1a57-47a1-8ce5-e3d3baf09427
Alpha ThalassemiaAlpha thalassemia is a blood disorder in which the body has a problem producing alpha globin, a component of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/thalassemias.html/3f585363-6910-4555-8974-0ac2bce7df91
AnemiaAnemia is common in teens because they undergo rapid growth spurts, when the body needs more nutrients like iron. Learn about anemia and how it's treated.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/anemia.html/d59f63cc-1045-4151-87c3-750eb2f414d4
Becoming a VegetarianPeople choose vegetarianism for a variety of reasons. This article describes different types of vegetarianism and provides advice on ways for vegetarians to get all the nutrients they need.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/vegetarian.html/5f669f38-aaba-4625-8686-dbc536b7a46a
Beta ThalassemiaBeta thalassemia is a blood disorder in which the body has a problem producing beta globin, a component of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/beta-thalassemia.html/92b6c08b-14ad-4b67-bc47-c1acd388d19c
Blood Find out about the mysterious, life-sustaining fluid called blood.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/blood.html/4cbf9380-e4e4-445c-92a9-93f01a97516b
Blood Test: Complete Blood CountThis common blood test helps doctors gather information about a person's blood cells and how they're working. Find out why doctors do this test and what's involved for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/test-cbc.html/6843c50f-dc8a-4b78-8fc7-50f34942c2d7
Blood Test: Ferritin (Iron)Doctors may order a ferritin test when they suspect kids have too little or too much iron in their bodies.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-ferritin.html/8a749966-acaf-40af-8e4f-2e43cf958214
Blood Test: HemoglobinHemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells. A hemoglobin test can be done as part of a routine checkup to screen for problems and or because a child isn't feeling well. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/blood-test-hemoglobin.html/d1e09555-be24-4d30-9163-49a54cb14dff
Breastfeeding FAQs: How Much and How OftenHere's info about how often to breastfeed your baby, how long it takes to nurse, and much more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/breastfeed-often.html/96a43f7e-534a-4eeb-95c4-080e6ec54cec
Formula Feeding FAQs: Getting StartedShopping for formula-feeding supplies can be daunting. Here are answers to some common questions about formula feeding.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/formulafeed-starting.html/6d5a92cb-459c-427f-b107-dc59faaf85b6
IronIron is an important ingredient needed to make hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying part of every red blood cell.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/iron.html/d4b58ddd-4132-4d3e-bacf-94c06fe5d0e0
PMS, Cramps, and Irregular PeriodsGet the facts on which period problems are normal and which ones might indicate something's going on.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/menstrual-problems.html/dc8ec33f-7c5e-41eb-a3fb-f7fcb030b6b2
PicaSome young kids have the eating disorder pica, which is characterized by cravings to eat nonfood items.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/pica.html/3816b519-42ba-40c6-b41d-67e739f35fb5
Pregnant or Breastfeeding? Nutrients You NeedLearn which nutrients you need while pregnant or breastfeeding, and easy ways to add them to your diet.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/moms-nutrients.html/5186a8b0-6ccd-4a91-b897-4a71a77c503d
VegetarianismVegetarian diets have become more popular, and many parents may wonder if kids can safely follow a vegetarian diet and still get all the nutrients necessary for growing up healthy and strong.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/vegetarianism.html/a0cb7ae3-3945-440e-b7f6-166137d97e57
VitaminsHow vital are vitamins? Find out in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/vitamin.html/f1dadef1-f540-416c-a78b-82a4d03db9dc
Vitamins and MineralsVitamins and minerals are nutrients that the body needs to work properly. They boost the immune system, promote normal growth and development, and help cells and organs do their jobs.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/vitamins-minerals.html/7db5e5be-3935-4119-b49b-bb2e8a5ba349
What's Anemia?What does it mean when a kid has anemia? Learn about anemia, why kids get it, and how it's treated in our article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/anemia.html/9888df72-edc2-4c11-8660-bb2c4b682960
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-hematologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-hematologyHeart & Blood Vesselshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/medical/heart/e9ef0549-4392-4778-974d-753019ce4b8b