ECG (Electrocardiogram)enparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-EKG-enHD-AR1.jpgIs your child scheduled to have an ECG? Find out how this test is performed and when you can expect the results.diagnostic tests, electrocardiography, ecgs, ekgs, electrodes, irregular heartbeats, heart chambers, heart damages, heart murmurs, heart valves, EKG, ECG, heart tests, exercise treadmills, cardiac, CD1Diagnostic Tests, CD1Cardiology, electrocardiogram, ekg, electro, CD1Diagnostic Tests, CD1Cardiology,CD1 Congential Heart Defects, CD1Aortic Stenosis, CD1Atrial Septal Defects, CD1Atrioventricular Canal Defect, CD1Coarctation of the Aorta, CD1Ebstein's Anomaly, CD1HypoplasticLeft Heart Syndrome, CD1Interrupted Aortic Arch, CD1Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA), CD1Pulmonary Artery Sling, CD1Pulmonary Stenosis, CD1Tetralogy of Fallot, CD1Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return, CD1Transposition of the Great Arteries, CD1Tricuspid Atresia, CD1Ventricular Septal Defects, CD1Truncus Arteriosus06/18/200108/19/201909/02/2019Nemours Medical Experts3b7f9c4b-b77a-4c15-b95a-6e44bc873875https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ekg.html/<p>An <strong>electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG)</strong> measures the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/heart.html/">heart's</a> electrical activity. This can help doctors tell how the heart is working and identify any problems.</p> <p>The ECG can help show the rate and regularity of heartbeats, the size and position of the heart's chambers, and whether there is any damage.</p> <h3>How Is an ECG Done?</h3> <p>There is nothing painful about getting an ECG. The patient&nbsp;is asked to lie down, and small metal tabs (called electrodes) are fixed to the skin with sticky papers. These electrodes are placed in a standard pattern on the shoulders, the chest, the wrists, and the ankles.</p> <p>After the electrodes are in place, the person&nbsp;is asked to hold still and, perhaps, to hold his or her breath briefly while the heartbeats are recorded for a short period. The patient also might be asked to get up and exercise for a while.</p> <p>The information is interpreted by a machine and drawn as a graph. The graph shows multiple waves, which reflect the activity of the heart. The height, length, and frequency of the waves are read in the following way:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>The number of waves per minute on the graph is the <strong>heart rate</strong>.</li> <li>The distances between these waves is the <strong>heart rhythm</strong>.</li> <li>The shapes of the waves show how well the <strong>heart's electrical impulses</strong> are working, the <strong>size of the heart</strong>, and how well the <strong>individual parts</strong> of the heart are working together.</li> <li>The consistency of the waves provides fairly specific information about any <strong>heart damage</strong>.</li> </ul> <h3 style="outline: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-left: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;">What Can an ECG Diagnose?</h3> <p>A person's heartbeat should be consistent and even. ECGs look for abnormally slow and fast heart rates, abnormal rhythm patterns, conduction blocks (short-circuits of the heart's electrical impulses that cause rhythm inconsistencies between the upper and lower chambers) &mdash; and four types of heart damage:</p> <ol> <li><strong>ventricular hypertrophy</strong> &mdash; an abnormal thickening of the heart muscle</li> <li><strong>ischemia</strong> &mdash; caused by an abnormally decreased <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/blood.html/">blood</a> supply</li> <li><strong>cardiomyopathies</strong> &mdash; abnormalities in the heart muscle itself</li> <li><strong>electrolyte and drug disturbances</strong> &mdash; these can change the heart's electrochemical environment</li> </ol> <p>Computerized ECGs can be used with other tests to get a multimedia account of the heart. These other tests include <strong>echocardiograms</strong> (which are basically "ultrasound" tests that bounce sound off the heart and use the echoes to make an image) and <strong>thallium scans</strong> (which are kind of like X-rays and use a radioactive tracer, injected into the bloodstream, to help draw a picture of the heart).</p> <p>In the past, the ECG was recorded on a machine that drew on long strips of paper, with records from each electrode presented in a standard sequence. Now the ECG tracings are stored as computer files that can be called up and printed.</p> <h3 style="outline: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-left: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;">When Are&nbsp;Results Ready?</h3> <p>Results of the ECG are available immediately. In fact, the ECG machine's computer even provides an instant interpretation of the findings as it makes the report. However, the doctor also might ask an expert, usually a cardiologist, to help analyze and interpret the ECG.&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 1em;">Some of the ECG results may be subtle, requiring an expert eye to detect them.</span></p>Electrocardiograma (ECG)Un electrocardiograma (ECG) mide la actividad eléctrica del corazón. Esto puede ayudar a los médicos a saber cómo está funcionando el corazón y a identificar cualquier problema.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/ekg-esp.html/7535f095-004d-43c9-b5e3-b673734329f3
Arrhythmia (Abnormal Heartbeat)An arrhythmia is an abnormal heartbeat usually caused by an electrical "short circuit" in the heart. Many are minor and not a health threat, but some can indicate a more serious problem.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/arrhythmias.html/19038a47-2ae4-48f8-8bd5-9e46150171b0
ArrhythmiasArrhythmias are abnormal heartbeats usually caused by an electrical "short circuit" in the heart. Many are minor and not a significant health threat, but others can indicate a more serious problem.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/arrhythmias.html/79184e00-417e-4ce4-a49b-2e89de1b1bd4
Cardiac CatheterizationThis minimally invasive procedure helps doctors perform diagnostic tests on the heart and even treat some heart conditions.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cardiac-catheter.html/e17d1f5d-ba99-46a6-865b-c426321a7d47
Congenital Heart DefectsHeart defects happen when there's a problem with a baby's heart development during pregnancy. Most heart defects can be treated during infancy.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/if-heart-defect.html/3dd23fa7-906f-4df9-8638-7400b77bed42
EKG (Video)This video shows what it's like to have an electrocardiogram (EKG for short).https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/video-ekg.html/33217804-bedd-4b29-9ba0-5e5539cdb783
Getting an EKG (Video)Getting an EKG doesn't hurt and it gives doctors important info about how your heart is beating. Watch what happens in this video for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/video-ekg.html/0a1abc9f-625f-43ff-84a2-abcdc4fb2826
Heart HealthAre you heart smart? Learn about this amazing muscle, including how to care for kids with heart conditions.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/heart-health-center.html/88f2105c-8446-4576-bb5e-078f57766557
Heart MurmursEveryone's heart makes sounds, but some people have hearts that make more noise than others. Usually, however, these heart murmurs don't mean anything is wrong. Find out more about these mysterious murmurs.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/heart-murmurs.html/38913fec-cf94-4522-b3c2-985ecb0f0db6
Heart and Circulatory SystemThe heart and circulatory system (also called the cardiovascular system) make up the network that delivers blood to the body's tissues.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/heart.html/fde8120a-c54e-4e57-94b8-fb4375c29487
Ventricular Septal DefectVentricular septal defect, or VSD, is a heart condition that a few teens can have. Find out what it is, how it happens, and what doctors do to correct it.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/vsd.html/840c44ec-78bd-4e55-ae74-37dcf68a1407
Words to Know (Heart Glossary)A guide to medical terms about the heart and circulatory system. In an easy A-Z format, find definitions on heart defects, heart conditions, treatments, and more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/heart-glossary.html/ba52d6b8-f516-479b-b2de-ad634d6053da
Your Heart & Circulatory SystemYour heart is a hard-working muscle. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/heart.html/9730472f-2ef1-413a-92bf-041c533b9564
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-cardiologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-behavioralHealthCaring for Your Childhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hearthealth/livingheartcond/a5caa6fd-b063-42fe-933e-6802d2bf0897Managing Health Carehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cerebralpalsy-center/cp-healthcare/c3441eff-b2e9-402b-a9e4-caa7dd66cae4Sick Kidshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/general/sick/3c1c9be2-f915-4f76-baac-ad2943a5a8e6Medical Tests & Examshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/medical/b5327501-2bda-444b-8df1-a1af15af79cb