Urine Test: Dipstickenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-testDipStick-enHD-AR1.gifA urine dipstick test is often done as part of an overall urinalysis. The results of this test can help doctors diagnose a urinary tract infection (UTI), kidney disease, diabetes, or a urinary tract injury.urine dipstick tests, diagnostic tests, urinalysis, urinary tract infections, UTI, urinates, pee, peeing, urine tests, medical tests, diagnosis, medical tests, peeing on a stick, white blood cells, protein, glucose, dipsticks, dip sticks, urine samples, kidney disease, diabetes, urinary tract injuries, kidneys, clean-catch method, catheters, CD1Nephrology, CD1Urology10/13/200804/08/201909/02/20190933bbc1-3956-4651-8e80-2cb5b97583cbhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dipstick.html/ <h3>What It Is</h3> <p>A urine dipstick test is often done as part of an overall urinalysis, but it also can be done on its own, depending on the doctor's concerns.</p> <p>Once a urine sample is collected, a nurse or technician will place a specially treated chemical strip (dipstick) into your child's urine (pee). Patches on the dipstick will change color to indicate the presence of such things as white blood cells, protein, or glucose.</p> <h3>Why It's Done</h3> <p>The results of a urine dipstick test may point to a diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI), kidney disease, diabetes, or a urinary tract injury. If test results are abnormal, other tests will be needed before a definite diagnosis can be made.</p> <h3>Preparation</h3> <p>No preparation other than cleansing the area around the urinary opening is required for the urine dipstick test.</p> <h3>The Procedure</h3> <p>Your child will be asked to urinate into a clean sample cup in the doctor's office. If your child isn't potty trained and can't urinate into a cup, a catheter (a narrow, soft tube) may need to be inserted into the bladder to obtain the urine specimen.</p> <p>The skin surrounding the urinary opening has to be cleaned and rinsed just before the urine is collected. In this "clean-catch" method, you or your child cleans the skin around the urinary opening with a special towelette. The child then urinates, stops momentarily, and then urinates again into the collection container. Catching the urine in "midstream" is the goal. Be sure to wash your hands and your child's hands after this process.</p> <p>Sometimes, if the doctor is concerned about a urinary problem that isn't due to an infection, a urine collection bag might be used to collect a sample from an infant. If you're doing the collection at home, you'll clean your baby's genital area and then arrange the bag around the urinary opening. Once the bag is in place, you'll secure it with the attached adhesive tape. You can put a diaper on your baby after you've attached the bag. You'll be instructed on how to remove the bag once your baby has urinated into it, usually within an hour.</p> <p>Sometimes, if the doctor is concerned about a urinary problem that isn't due to an infection, a urine collection bag with adhesive tape on one end might be used to collect a sample from an infant. If you're doing the collection at home, you'll clean your baby's genital area and then arrange the bag around the urinary opening. Once the bag is in place, you'll secure it with the attached tape. You can put a diaper on your baby after you've attached the bag. You'll be instructed on how to remove the bag once your baby has urinated into it, usually within an hour.</p> <p>Once collected, the technician or nurse will then place the dipstick into the urine sample. Collecting the specimen should only take a few minutes.</p> <h3>What to Expect</h3> <p>Because the test involves normal urination, there shouldn't be any discomfort as long as your child can provide a urine specimen. It's important to keep the area around the urinary opening clean before the test and to catch the urine sample midstream.</p> <h3>Getting the Results</h3> <p>The results of the urine dipstick test will be available right away. If abnormalities are found, further urine tests will be needed. Talk to your child's doctor about the meaning of the specific test results.</p> <h3>Risks</h3> <p>No risks are associated with taking a urine dipstick test. If a catheterized specimen is required, it may cause temporary discomfort.</p> <h3>Helping Your Child</h3> <p>The urine dipstick test is painless. Explaining how the test will be conducted, and why it's being done, can help ease your child's fear. Make sure your child understands that the urinary opening must be clean and the urine must be collected midstream.</p> <h3>If You Have Questions</h3> <p>If you have questions about the urine dipstick test, speak with your doctor.</p> Análisis de orina: tira reactivaUn análisis de orina con tira reactiva suele formar parte de un análisis de orina completo, pero también se puede hacer de forma aislada, en función de qué sea lo que le preocupe al médico. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/dipstick-esp.html/7b058439-2e9c-45d6-8b29-edd686dd6963
Getting a Urine Test (Video)If your doctor wants a urine sample, he or she means pee. It's easy to give a sample. Watch how this test is done in this video for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/video-urtest.html/409712ff-7ef6-45fb-9168-853f10b0490b
Kidney DiseaseSometimes, the kidneys can't do their job properly. In teens, kidney disease is usually due to infections, structural issues, glomerulonephritis, or nephrotic syndrome. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidney.html/4f21e885-14a9-4b12-a514-66998f93043c
Kidney Diseases in ChildhoodThe kidneys play a critical role in health. When something goes wrong, it could indicate a kidney disease. What are kidney diseases, and how can they be treated?https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidney-diseases-childhood.html/ce75e066-a9e8-498f-97e8-6459154b9748
Kidneys and Urinary TractThe kidneys perform several functions that are essential to health, the most important of which are to filter blood and produce urine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidneys.html/d0d97a22-7118-4082-acae-02dd5319be95
Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related ConditionsRecurrent urinary tract infections can cause kidney damage if left untreated, especially in kids under age 6. Here's how to recognize the symptom of UTIs and get help for your child.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/recurrent-uti-infections.html/879c8981-5f68-4043-9679-090edaf99dc9
Urinary Tract InfectionsA urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common reasons that teens visit a doctor. Learn about the symptoms of UTIs, how they're treated, and more in this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/uti.html/a97f6174-4629-4696-b5bc-a461856cdd95
Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in kids. They're easy to treat and usually clear up in a week or so.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/6a6f9f52-f903-4360-877f-dd35d531d84f
Urine Test (Video)This video shows what it's like to get a urine test.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/video-urtest.html/e3255a0d-7e93-4be5-ae30-2d4c31a7b077
Urine Test: ProteinThe urine protein test is most commonly used to screen for kidney disease and also can help monitor kidney function.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-protein.html/c3e958a1-f860-4e9b-85d5-e2ad8f28b6ac
Urine TestsIs your child having a urine culture or urinalysis performed? Find out why urine tests are performed, and what to expect when the doctor orders them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/labtest7.html/d8a510e5-7cb2-4868-9e5e-02f65dfb9f45
What Problems Can Diabetes Cause?Thinking about your diabetes a little bit now — and taking some steps to prevent problems — can make things easier down the road.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/complications.html/a156cd10-f4e7-4416-94c5-0182fc4e0ae5
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-pathologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-pathologyManaging Health Carehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cerebralpalsy-center/cp-healthcare/c3441eff-b2e9-402b-a9e4-caa7dd66cae4Medical Tests & Examshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/medical/b5327501-2bda-444b-8df1-a1af15af79cb