Communication and Your Newbornenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P_CommunicationNewborn_enHD_AR1.jpgFrom birth, your newborn has been communicating with you. Crying may seem like a foreign language, but soon you'll know what your baby needs - a diaper change, a feeding, or your touch.baby, newborns, infants, births, communications, talking to my baby, understanding my newborns, crying, cries, body language, foreign languages, diaper change, nursing, bottle feedings, breastfeeding, naps, my baby is upset, colicky, bassinets, cribs, smiles, laughs, giggles, senses, fussy, rocking chair, seeing, hearing, delivery, born, general pediatrics, neonatology, neonatal, developmental medicine, behavioral medicine03/22/200006/26/201906/26/2019Mary L. Gavin, MD06/17/2019804c85f1-c9ab-4f9a-b025-1d0c3005e81ahttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cnewborn.html/<p>Do you remember your baby's very first cry? From the moment of birth, babies begin to communicate.</p> <p>At first, your newborn's cries may seem like a foreign language. But before you know it, you'll learn your baby's "language" and be able to answer your little one's needs.</p> <h3>How Do Babies Communicate?</h3> <p>Babies are born with the ability to cry, which is how they communicate for a while. Your baby's cries generally tell you that something is wrong: an empty belly, a wet bottom, cold feet, being tired, or a need to be held and cuddled, etc.</p> <p>Sometimes what a baby needs can be identified by the type of cry &mdash; for example, the "I'm hungry" cry may be short and low-pitched, while "I'm upset" may sound choppy. Before you know it, you'll probably be able to recognize which need your baby is expressing and respond accordingly.</p> <p>But babies also can cry when feeling overwhelmed by all of the sights and sounds of the world &mdash; or for no clear reason at all. So if your baby cries and you aren't able to console him or her immediately, remember that crying is one way babies shut out stimuli when they're overloaded.</p> <p>While crying is the main way that babies communicate, they also use other, more subtle forms. Learning to recognize them is rewarding and can strengthen your <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/bonding.html/">bond with your baby</a>.</p> <p>A newborn can tell the difference&nbsp;between a human voice and other sounds. Try to pay attention to how your little one responds to your voice, which is already associated with care: food, warmth, touch.</p> <p>If your baby is crying in the bassinet, see how quickly your approaching voice quiets him or her. See how closely your baby listens when you talk in loving tones. Your baby may not yet coordinate looking and listening, but even when staring into the distance, will be paying close attention to your voice as you speak. Your baby may subtly adjust body position or facial expression, or even move the arms and legs in time with your speech.</p> <p>Sometime during your newborn's first month, you may get a glimpse of a first smile &mdash; a welcome addition to your baby's communication skills!</p> <h3>What Should I Do?</h3> <p>As soon as you hold your baby after birth, you'll begin to communicate with each other by exchanging your first glances, sounds, and touches. Babies quickly learn about the world through their <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/sensenewborn.html/">senses</a>.</p> <p>As the days after birth pass, your newborn will become accustomed to seeing you and will begin to focus on your face. The senses of touch and hearing are especially important, though.</p> <p>Your baby will be curious about noises, but none more so than the spoken voice. Talk to your baby whenever you have the chance. Even though your baby doesn't understand what you're saying, your calm, reassuring voice conveys safety. Your newborn is learning about life with almost every touch, so provide lots of tender kisses and your little one will find the world a soothing place.</p> <p>Communicating with newborns is a matter of meeting their needs. Always respond to your newborn's cries &mdash; babies cannot be spoiled with too much attention. Indeed, quick responses to babies' cries lets them know that they're important and worthy of attention.</p> <p>There will probably be times when you have met all needs, yet your baby continues to cry. Don't despair &mdash; your little one might&nbsp;be overstimulated, have too much energy, or just need a good cry for no apparent reason.</p> <p>It's common for babies to have a fussy period about the same time every day, generally between early evening and midnight. Though all newborns cry and show some fussiness, when an infant who is otherwise healthy cries for more than 3 hours per day, more than 3 days per week for at least 3 weeks, it is a condition known as <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/colic.html/">colic</a>. This can be upsetting, but the good news is that it's short-lived &mdash; most babies outgrow it at around 3 or 4 months of age.</p> <p>Try to soothe your baby. Some are comforted by motion, such as rocking or being walked back and forth across the room, while others respond to sounds, like soft music or the hum of a vacuum cleaner. It may take some time to find out what best comforts your baby during these stressful periods.</p> <h3>When Should I Call the Doctor?</h3> <p>Talk to your doctor if:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Your baby seems to cry for an unusual length of time.</li> <li>The cries sound odd to you.</li> <li>The crying is associated with decreased activity, poor feeding, or unusual breathing or movements.</li> </ul> <p>Your doctor can reassure you or look for a medical reason for your baby's distress. Chances are there is nothing wrong, and knowing this can help you relax and stay calm when your baby is upset.</p> <p>Here are some other reasons for lasting crying:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>The baby is ill. A baby who cries more when being held or rocked may be sick. Call your doctor, especially if the baby has a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/fever.html/">fever</a> of 100.4&deg;F (38&deg;C) or more.</li> <li>The baby has an eye irritation. A <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/corneal-abrasions.html/">scratched cornea</a> or "foreign body" in a baby's eye can cause redness and tearing. Call your doctor.</li> <li>The baby is in pain. An open diaper pin or other object could be hurting the baby's skin. Take a close look everywhere, even each finger and toe (sometimes hair can get wrapped around a baby's tiny digits and cause pain; this is known as a hair tourniquet).</li> </ul> <p>If you have any questions about your newborn's ability to see or hear, call your doctor right away. Even newborns can be tested using sophisticated equipment, if necessary. The sooner a problem is caught, the better it can be treated.</p>La comunicación y su recién nacido¿Recuerda el primer llanto de su hijo? Desde el momento de su nacimiento, los bebés se empiezan a comunicar a través del llanto. Antes de lo que usted cree, aprenderá el “idioma” de su bebé y será capaz de responder a sus necesidades. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/cnewborn-esp.html/1d2838fe-363f-4c6b-ac46-17274a6c23f2
A Guide for First-Time ParentsIf you're a first-time parent, put your fears aside and get the basics in this guide about burping, bathing, bonding, and other baby-care concerns.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/guide-parents.html/186709b2-0cb2-41a0-b9be-86c9ca129a57
Becoming a FatherPregnant women experience a variety of emotions and life changes. But most first-time dads have lots of feelings and concerns to deal with, too.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/father.html/6ee79cb5-b7e6-40f6-b337-b006f13013ae
Feeding Your NewbornThese guidelines on breastfeeding and bottle feeding can help you know what's right for you and your baby.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/feednewborn.html/31c4eb38-d266-4e5a-b06b-c7ee09d8ced8
Jaundice in NewbornsJaundice is when a baby has yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes. Most types of jaundice go away on their own.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/jaundice.html/80f16341-6efa-4972-a4f3-4f1c2ca15981
Learning, Play, and Your NewbornPlay is the primary way that infants learn how to move, communicate, socialize, and understand their surroundings. And during the first month of life, your baby will learn by interacting with you.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/learnnewborn.html/43b40b93-3a6c-4eb0-9bdf-7cf7662f3a2f
Looking at Your Newborn: What's NormalWhen you first meet your newborn, you may be surprised by what you see. Here's what to expect.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/newborn-variations.html/b4629b06-91b5-41c6-8dfd-f8d494164574
Medical Care and Your NewbornBy the time you hold your new baby for the first time, you've probably chosen your little one's doctor. Learn about your newborn's medical care.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/mednewborn.html/bbcc2be8-a088-404a-bd56-f3fc8f953710
Movement, Coordination, and Your NewbornIt may seem like all babies do is sleep, eat, and cry, but their little bodies are making many movements, some of which are reflexes.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/movenewborn.html/bc155a68-b011-44aa-8599-a1f5e773df0a
Pregnancy & Newborn CenterAdvice and information for expectant and new parents.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/pregnancy-center.html/c58d014a-89a3-4c90-8b54-c9cadf5d6016
Sleep and Your NewbornNewborn babies don’t yet have a sense of day and night. They wake often to eat – no matter what time it is.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/sleepnewborn.html/4f31c9a3-e06c-4c79-9823-95b98e46ec43
Your Child’s Development: 3-5 DaysDoctors use certain milestones to tell if a baby is developing as expected. Here are some things your baby may be doing.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/development-3to5d.html/7a5777d6-ff47-4bce-a7cc-2bd67b2d04c4
Your Newborn's GrowthA newborn's growth and development is measured from the moment of birth. Find out if your baby's size is normal, and what to expect as your baby grows.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/grownewborn.html/e0ab9fc0-9148-43ec-b047-e05f68aa23a8
Your Newborn's Hearing, Vision, and Other SensesYour newborn is taking in first sights, sounds, and smells while learning to explore the world through the senses. What are your baby's responses to light, noise, and touch?https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/sensenewborn.html/d9135684-7436-441f-940c-f50074b15494
kh:age-babyZeroToOnekh:clinicalDesignation-developmentalMedicinekh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-developmentalMedicineNewborn Carehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/pregnancy-center/newborn-care/92cfa6ea-2e13-47d8-a2c6-6678383a3c14Communicationhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/growth/communication/bf8c93d4-e878-447f-b3ec-8962be50c71cCommunicating With Your Babyhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/pregnancy-newborn/communicating/3a418216-1017-4782-9a5b-3388fbbc986a