A to Z: Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR)enparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgLearn more about conditions and infections of the urinary tract and kidneys.vesicoureteral reflux, VUR, urinary tract infections, bladder, kidneys, ureters, urine, urinary tract, renal system, kidney disease, renal failure, kidney failure10/26/201204/12/201909/02/201907976718-6709-4f73-9a7f-8b1ff65e960dhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-vur.html/<p><em>May also be called: VUR</em></p> <p>Vesicoureteral (ves-ih-koe-yoo-REE-ter-ul) reflux, or VUR, is a condition in which urine (pee) abnormally flows backward (or refluxes) from the bladder into the ureters (tubes that carry the urine out of each <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/">kidney</a>).</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>Normally, urine is made in the kidneys and flows to the bladder through thin tubes called ureters. But sometimes a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/birth-defects.html/">congenital</a> (present at birth) condition can cause urine to flow backward from the bladder to ureters. This can be due to defects in the ureter or blockages in the urinary system.</p> <p>If backed-up urine reaches the kidneys, it can lead to <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/recurrent-uti-infections.html/">urinary tract and kidney infections (UTIs)</a> and scarring of the kidney over time. In some cases, vesicoureteral reflux can eventually lead to long-term problems like kidney damage and kidney failure.</p> <p>VUR is most common in infants and young children, but can affect people of any age. Treatment depends upon the severity of the condition. Many kids outgrow VUR and benefit from daily treatment with a small amount of antibiotic to help prevent UTIs. More severe cases may require surgery to correct the VUR.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>Prompt diagnosis and treatment of VUR usually is enough to prevent kidney damage. Most kids with mild forms of vesicoureteral reflux outgrow it with no long-term complications.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
Kidneys and Urinary TractThe kidneys perform several functions that are essential to health, the most important of which are to filter blood and produce urine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidneys.html/d0d97a22-7118-4082-acae-02dd5319be95
Movie: Urinary SystemWatch this movie about the urinary system, which produces pee.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/usmovie.html/9383ee79-0d68-4e64-ab41-0680cdcac139
Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related ConditionsRecurrent urinary tract infections can cause kidney damage if left untreated, especially in kids under age 6. Here's how to recognize the symptom of UTIs and get help for your child.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/recurrent-uti-infections.html/879c8981-5f68-4043-9679-090edaf99dc9
Urinary Tract InfectionsA urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common reasons that teens visit a doctor. Learn about the symptoms of UTIs, how they're treated, and more in this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/uti.html/a97f6174-4629-4696-b5bc-a461856cdd95
Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in kids. They're easy to treat and usually clear up in a week or so.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/6a6f9f52-f903-4360-877f-dd35d531d84f
Urine TestsIs your child having a urine culture or urinalysis performed? Find out why urine tests are performed, and what to expect when the doctor orders them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/labtest7.html/d8a510e5-7cb2-4868-9e5e-02f65dfb9f45
Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG)A VCUG can help evaluate the bladder's size and shape, and look for problems, such as a blockage. It can also show whether pee is moving in the right direction.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-vcug.html/e8d299b3-efa8-422a-8465-14354e125589
Your KidneysYou need at least one kidney to live. Find out why in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/kidneys.html/e8b731bd-422b-4032-952a-5f2223257f23
Your Urinary SystemYou pee every day, but what makes it happen? Find out in this article for kids about the urinary system.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/pee.html/6715ddc0-cd8e-428a-afd4-e3e3db22267f
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-nephrologykh:clinicalDesignation-urologykh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-urologyVhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/v/764e8c27-b324-43dd-b4fe-51d05d921cee