A to Z: Renal Dysplasiaenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgLearn about potential complications of fetal development and conditions that affect the kidneys and urinary tract.Renal dysplasia, kidney dysplasia, multicystic dysplastic kidney, MCDK, renal hypodysplasia, kidneys, urinary tract, ureters, pregnancy, fetal development, nephrons, glomeruli, bladder, urine, cysts08/14/201304/11/201909/02/2019f22321a9-9fd4-47f1-ae6d-dc41cd6d7d4ehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-renal-dysplasia.html/<p><em>May also be called: Kidney Dysplasia; Multicystic Dysplastic Kidney; MCDK</em></p> <p>Renal dysplasia (REE-nul dis-PLAY-zhee-uh) is a condition in which one or both of a baby's <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/">kidneys</a> develop abnormally in the womb, often causing cysts (fluid-filled sacs) to replace normal kidney tissue.</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>Kidneys filter waste products from the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/blood.html/">blood</a>&nbsp;to form urine (pee), which flows from the kidneys to the bladder through thin tubes called ureters. Normally, when a fetus is developing, ureters grow into kidneys and branch out to form the network that collects urine.</p> <p>With renal dysplasia, this process is disrupted, and urine can't flow out of the affected kidney as it's supposed to. Instead, the urine collects inside the kidney and forms cysts. Renal dysplasia can be related to a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/about-genetics.html/">genetic</a> disorder, or prescription or illegal drugs used by a mother during pregnancy.</p> <p>Usually, renal dysplasia is found in only one kidney, but in some cases, both kidneys may be affected. When only one kidney is involved, babies usually grow normally and may have no symptoms or health problems. Symptoms that can occur&nbsp;include problems with kidney function, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/">urinary tract infections (UTIs)</a>, and, rarely, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hypertension.html/">high blood pressure</a>.</p> <p>When renal dysplasia affects both kidneys, babies generally don't survive pregnancy; those who do need dialysis treatment and a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidney-transplant.html/">kidney transplant</a> early in life.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>Most kids with renal dysplasia in only one kidney require no treatment and don't experience any problems or complications as a result of the condition. The unaffected kidney can take over and effectively do the work of both kidneys. However, these children still need to be closely monitored for UTIs and high blood pressure, both of which can damage the healthy kidney.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
GlomerulonephritisWith glomerulonephritis, tiny filtering units in the kidneys stop working properly, causing problems like too much fluid in the body and swelling. Most of the time it can be treated. Find out more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/glomerulonephritis.html/a3bf3907-d553-460e-92a5-ecbae0da926d
Kidney DiseaseSometimes, the kidneys can't do their job properly. In teens, kidney disease is usually due to infections, structural issues, glomerulonephritis, or nephrotic syndrome. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidney.html/4f21e885-14a9-4b12-a514-66998f93043c
Kidney Diseases in ChildhoodThe kidneys play a critical role in health. When something goes wrong, it could indicate a kidney disease. What are kidney diseases, and how can they be treated?https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidney-diseases-childhood.html/ce75e066-a9e8-498f-97e8-6459154b9748
Kidney StonesKidney stones mostly happen to adults, but sometimes teens can get them. Find out what kidney stones are, how to treat them, and ways to help prevent them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidney-stones.html/52e208a2-626b-4e2e-8491-a5cba5a9099b
Kidney TransplantIf the kidneys stop working, a person will need either dialysis or a transplant. Get the facts on kidney transplant in this article for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidney-transplant.html/0eaed509-b5fe-430b-839e-8ae36bf4971b
Kidneys and Urinary TractThe bean-shaped kidneys, each about the size of a child's fist, are essential to our health. Their most important role is to filter blood and produce urine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/0cbf3444-1a45-4512-9af9-bc76e5592336
Movie: Urinary SystemWatch this movie about the urinary system, which produces pee.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/usmovie.html/9383ee79-0d68-4e64-ab41-0680cdcac139
Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related ConditionsRecurrent urinary tract infections can cause kidney damage if left untreated, especially in kids under age 6. Here's how to recognize the symptom of UTIs and get help for your child.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/recurrent-uti-infections.html/879c8981-5f68-4043-9679-090edaf99dc9
Ultrasound: BladderDoctors order bladder ultrasounds when there's a concern about bladder problems, such as difficulty urinating or daytime wetting.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ultrasound-bladder.html/62b31da4-cda0-493f-a393-338578c464d9
Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder)A renal ultrasound makes images of your child's kidneys, ureters, and bladder. Doctors may order this test if they suspect kidney damage, cysts, tumors, kidney stones, or complications from urinary tract infections.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/renal-ultrasound.html/05b3083e-733a-40c6-9fd9-5a38877ccc4f
Urinary Tract InfectionsA urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common reasons that teens visit a doctor. Learn about the symptoms of UTIs, how they're treated, and more in this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/uti.html/a97f6174-4629-4696-b5bc-a461856cdd95
Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in kids. They're easy to treat and usually clear up in a week or so.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/6a6f9f52-f903-4360-877f-dd35d531d84f
Urine Test: Automated Dipstick UrinalysisAutomated dipstick urinalysis results may point to a urinary tract infection (UTI) or injury, kidney disease, or diabetes.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-auto-ds.html/1150df63-c85a-46ce-83b7-08579c781753
Urine TestsIs your child having a urine culture or urinalysis performed? Find out why urine tests are performed, and what to expect when the doctor orders them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/labtest7.html/d8a510e5-7cb2-4868-9e5e-02f65dfb9f45
When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney DiseaseParents of kids who have a chronic kidney disease often worry about what might happen next, how their child feels, and what treatments are likely to be involved. Find answers here.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/chronic-kidney-disease.html/9edcb2c0-d2af-4fd7-88e9-48c0ff7a2f55
When Your Child Needs a Kidney TransplantIf your child needs a kidney transplant, you're probably feeling lots of emotions. Fortunately, many kids who undergo kidney transplants go on to live normal, healthy lives.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidney-transplant.html/453b2488-cfff-4e14-bdbd-818b9906f828
Your KidneysYou need at least one kidney to live. Find out why in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/kidneys.html/e8b731bd-422b-4032-952a-5f2223257f23
Your Urinary SystemYou pee every day, but what makes it happen? Find out in this article for kids about the urinary system.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/pee.html/6715ddc0-cd8e-428a-afd4-e3e3db22267f
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