A to Z: Peritonsillar Abscessenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgA peritonsillar abscess is an area of pus-filled tissue at the back of the mouth, next to one of the tonsils.peritonsillar, tonsils, abscess, tonsil, pus, throat, throat infection, strep throat, strep, absess, abssess, absces, absessed, tonsuls, tonsillar, pus, infected throat, throat infections, sore throut, draining, drainage10/26/201201/07/202001/07/2020f6bd38c3-972e-46c3-aecd-ca4e907abf9ahttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-peritonsillar.html/<p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/"><img class="right" title="Parents image" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-atoZDictionary-enBT.jpg" alt="A to Z Dictionary 500 Go" name="5093-P_ATOZDICTIONARY2_ENBT.JPG" /></a></p> <p>A <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/peritonsillar-abscess.html/">peritonsillar abscess</a> is an area of pus-filled tissue at the back of the mouth, next to one of the tonsils.</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>A peritonsillar abscess can be very painful and can make it hard to open the mouth. It can also cause swelling that may push a person's tonsil toward the uvula (the dangling fleshy tissue in the back of the mouth). If this happens, it can become hard to swallow, speak, and maybe even breathe.</p> <p>The same <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/germs.html/">bacteria</a> that cause <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/strep-throat.html/">strep throat</a> cause peritonsillar abscesses.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>A child with symptoms of a peritonsillar <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/abscess.html/">abscess</a> should see a doctor. If left untreated, the abscess can lead to more serious health problems. Treatment includes antibiotics (often given through <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/intravenous-line.html/">an IV</a>) and draining the abscess.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
Peritonsillar AbscessA peritonsillar abscess is an area of pus-filled tissue at the back of the mouth, next to one of the tonsils. Find out how it happens and what to do.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/peritonsillar-abscess.html/53c0cdfe-b374-4d71-827c-fdd5c5f01133
Strep ThroatStrep throat is a common cause of sore throat in kids and teens. It usually requires treatment with antibiotics, but improves in a few days.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/strep-throat.html/4504e91d-3bbd-4d1a-beb8-516fc25df480
TonsillectomyEverybody's heard of tonsils, but not everyone knows what tonsils do in the body or why they may need to be removed. Find out here.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/tonsillectomy.html/673e2f1e-5c70-4179-beb7-d462d2f38952
TonsillitisTonsillitis is an infection that makes tonsils swollen and red. It can cause a sore throat, fever, swollen glands, and trouble swallowing.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/tonsillitis.html/b84c2f06-f125-483f-a524-334ba7ca6dfe
Word! TonsillectomyTonsils are those two bumps on each side of the back of your throat.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/word-tonsillectomy.html/2f4861b1-5c94-4815-9d94-2056b3b50af8
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