A to Z: Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA)enparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgLearn about heart conditions that affect newborn and premature babies.Patent ductus arteriosus, PDA, ductus arteriosus, heart, aorta, pulmonary artery, blood vessels, newborns, placenta, fetus, pregnancy, arteries, lungs, birth, premature babies, CD1Cardiology, CD1Congenital Heart Defects, CD1Patent Ductus Arteriosus06/12/201303/18/201909/02/2019668e51f1-4ee8-4400-b09c-465935f63c0fhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-pda.html/<p><em>May also be called: PDA</em></p> <p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/patent-ductus-arteriosus.html/">Patent ductus arteriosus</a> (DUK-tus ar-tir-ee-OH-sus), or PDA, is a condition in <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/newborn-variations.html/">newborn</a> babies in which a fetal blood vessel in the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/heart.html/">heart</a> fails to close as it normally should.</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>The ductus arteriosus (DA) is a normal blood vessel that connects two major arteries &mdash; the aorta and the pulmonary artery &mdash; that carry blood away from the heart in a developing fetus. The DA diverts blood away from the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/lungs.html/">lungs</a>, sending it directly to the body. The lungs are not used while a fetus is in the amniotic fluid because the baby gets oxygen directly from the mother's placenta. When a newborn breathes and begins to use the lungs, the DA is no longer needed and usually closes during the first 2 days after birth.</p> <p>If the DA fails to close, a patent (meaning "open") ductus arteriosus is the result. Oxygen-rich blood from the aorta mixes with oxygen-poor blood in the pulmonary artery, and too much blood flows into the lungs.</p> <p>Babies with a PDA may have poor feeding, poor growth, difficulty breathing, excessive sweating, fatigue, or a bluish color to the skin. A larger PDA puts a strain on the heart and increases blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries. A smaller PDA may not cause any symptoms.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>In the vast majority of babies who have&nbsp;a small PDA but otherwise normal heart, the PDA will shrink and go away on its own in the first few days of life. Other PDAs may close on their own within the first year of a baby's life.</p> <p>Large PDAs are rare, but can strain the heart&nbsp;and cause other problems. Medications, catheter-based procedures, or surgery may be used to close these PDAs.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
A to Z: Atresia, AorticLearn about congenital defects and conditions that affect vessels, valves, and passages in the heart and other organs.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-atresia-aortic.html/531db6f2-fb45-4636-b661-0acb38aa6ca3
Cardiac CatheterizationThis minimally invasive procedure helps doctors perform diagnostic tests on the heart and even treat some heart conditions.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cardiac-catheter.html/e17d1f5d-ba99-46a6-865b-c426321a7d47
Congenital Heart DefectsHeart defects happen when there's a problem with a baby's heart development during pregnancy. Most heart defects can be treated during infancy.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/if-heart-defect.html/3dd23fa7-906f-4df9-8638-7400b77bed42
Heart and Circulatory SystemThe heart and circulatory system are our body's lifeline, delivering blood to the body's tissues. Brush up on your ticker with this body basics article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/heart.html/52398b6a-54a6-4272-a569-42ed5b12aeac
Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA)The ductus arteriosus is a blood vessel that connects two major arteries before birth and normally closes after a baby is born. If it stays open, the result is a condition called patent ductus arteriosus (PDA).https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/patent-ductus-arteriosus.html/1220a363-ed10-4541-94c6-ecb923902cd8
kh:age-babyZeroToOnekh:clinicalDesignation-cardiologykh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-cardiologyPhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/p/e492181e-6c97-4cd3-8738-cebc1f62bc38Cardiology A to Zhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/az-cardio/04be85fa-f4f5-44c2-a321-21821f326c6a