A to Z: Nephrotic Syndromeenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgLearn about conditions that affect the kidneys and urinary tract.nephrotic syndrome, NS, nephrosis, kidneys, glomeruli, nephrons, kidney diseases, diabetes, protein, urine, urinary tract, glomerulonephritis, nephritis05/29/201304/09/201909/02/201985acb686-ff47-4797-bdd6-7d02cf489f48https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-nephrotic.html/<p><em>May also be called: NS: Nephrosis</em></p> <p>Nephrotic (neh-FROT-ik) syndrome is a condition in which&nbsp;a person loses large amounts of protein through the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/">urine</a>, which can lead to swelling of the face (often the eyes) or body (often around the genitals).</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/blood.html/">Blood</a> is filtered by tiny structures in the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidney.html/">kidneys</a> called glomeruli. A number of different conditions can cause the glomeruli to allow too much protein to come out of the blood and into the urine (pee). Protein helps hold fluids in the blood. With less protein, the fluids can move to other parts of the body and cause a type of swelling called <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-edema.html/">edema</a>, usually in the face, abdomen, arms, and legs. This can be accompanied by unintentional weight gain.</p> <p>Nephrotic syndrome isn't a disease and doesn't cause pain, but it can be a sign of kidney problems that may require treatment.</p> <p>For most younger kids, nephrotic syndrome is caused by a condition called minimal change disease. Other common causes in teens and adults include cancer, <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/diabetes-center.html/">diabetes</a>, and diseases and disorders of the kidney. Treatment for nephrotic syndrome involves treating the condition affecting the glomeruli.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>Medication can effectively treat many causes of nephrotic syndrome, including minimal change disease. Most kids whose nephrotic syndrome is due to&nbsp;minimal change disease will eventually outgrow the condition during their teens.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
A to Z: GlomerulonephritisGlomerulonephritis is an inflammation of the glomeruli, the parts of the filtering units (nephrons) of the kidney.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-glomerulonephritis.html/ae67534f-2754-46bf-b301-5ae7b8fbf631
Cancer CenterFrom treatments and prevention to coping with the emotional aspects of cancer, the Cancer Center provides comprehensive information that parents need.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/cancer-center.html/92fcdf56-6935-42ac-a953-9eaf5f96fe2f
Diabetes CenterDiabetes means a problem with insulin, an important hormone in the body. Find out how children with diabetes can stay healthy and do the normal stuff kids like to do.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/center/diabetes-center.html/0767277a-98f9-4541-b2f6-f3c68f43a94c
GlomerulonephritisWith glomerulonephritis, tiny filtering units in the kidneys stop working properly, causing problems like too much fluid in the body and swelling. Most of the time it can be treated. Find out more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/glomerulonephritis.html/a3bf3907-d553-460e-92a5-ecbae0da926d
Kidney DiseaseSometimes, the kidneys can't do their job properly. In teens, kidney disease is usually due to infections, structural issues, glomerulonephritis, or nephrotic syndrome. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidney.html/4f21e885-14a9-4b12-a514-66998f93043c
Kidney Diseases in ChildhoodThe kidneys play a critical role in health. When something goes wrong, it could indicate a kidney disease. What are kidney diseases, and how can they be treated?https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidney-diseases-childhood.html/ce75e066-a9e8-498f-97e8-6459154b9748
Kidneys and Urinary TractThe bean-shaped kidneys, each about the size of a child's fist, are essential to our health. Their most important role is to filter blood and produce urine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/0cbf3444-1a45-4512-9af9-bc76e5592336
Urine Test: ProteinThe urine protein test is most commonly used to screen for kidney disease and also can help monitor kidney function.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-protein.html/c3e958a1-f860-4e9b-85d5-e2ad8f28b6ac
When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney DiseaseParents of kids who have a chronic kidney disease often worry about what might happen next, how their child feels, and what treatments are likely to be involved. Find answers here.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/chronic-kidney-disease.html/9edcb2c0-d2af-4fd7-88e9-48c0ff7a2f55
Your KidneysYou need at least one kidney to live. Find out why in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/kidneys.html/e8b731bd-422b-4032-952a-5f2223257f23
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-nephrologykh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-nephrologyNhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/n/ff13bd4c-ccd4-4870-9a56-166e8aa6420e