A to Z: Hemiplegiaenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgLearn about congenital disorders and conditions that affect the brain and central nervous system.Hemiplegia, congenital hemiplegia, acquired hemiplegia, unilateral motor disability, alternating hemiplegia, hemiparesis, brain, central nervous system, stroke, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, vision problems, speech difficulty, paralysis08/14/201304/04/201909/02/201920248f95-3688-4cb7-a83b-c5bde739f7cdhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-hemiplegia.html/<p>Hemiplegia (hem-uh-PLEE-jee-uh) is paralysis that affects the motor function of one side of the body.</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>Hemiplegia is caused by damage to some part of the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/brain-nervous-system.html/">brain</a> that disrupts the connection between the brain and the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/bones-muscles-joints.html/">muscles</a> on the affected side. Damage to the right side of the brain affects the left side of the body, and damage to the left side of the brain affects the right side of the body.</p> <p>Hemiplegia can be congenital (meaning the brain is damaged before, during, or shortly after birth) or it can be the result of an injury or illness that damages the brain. Hemiplegia can cause stiffness, weakness, and a lack of control in the affected side of the body. It can be associated with a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seizure.html/">seizure</a> disorder, vision problems, and <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/not-talk.html/">speech difficulties</a>.</p> <p>Hemiplegia is a common side effect of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/strokes.html/">strokes</a>. In children, it is often associated with <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cerebral-palsy.html/">cerebral palsy</a>. Treatment for hemiplegia focuses on controlling symptoms and retraining the body to recover as much ability as possible through rehabilitation therapy.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>There is no cure for hemiplegia, but it doesn't get worse over time, and undamaged parts of the brain often can take over many of the functions of the damaged parts. Treatment and therapy (physical, speech, or occupational) can help minimize the effects of hemiplegia and help the affected side develop as fully as possible.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
Cerebral PalsyCerebral palsy is one of the most common developmental disabilities in the United States. It affects a person's ability to move and coordinate body movements.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/story-cerebral-palsy.html/c17c0b68-3e8b-4d2e-9639-8cc27ff43d52
Going to a Physical TherapistPhysical therapy uses exercises and other special treatments to help people move their bodies. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/physical-therapy.html/1a168d2a-98d8-45e8-b3b5-785fc9f6ecca
Going to a Speech TherapistYou might visit a speech therapist if you're having trouble speaking or understanding others. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/speech-therapist.html/949b7d74-02e5-451d-b374-bf774e71c3de
Occupational TherapyOccupational therapy can help improve kids' cognitive, physical, and motor skills and build their self-esteem and sense of accomplishment.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/occupational-therapy.html/e6873992-af60-4bab-82d9-3bd1fe9ad5a3
Physical TherapyPhysical therapy helps people get back to full strength and movement - and manage pain - in key parts of the body after an illness or injury.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/pt.html/d292496f-1bf8-4949-9563-f0436e185c33
SeizuresSeizures are caused by a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain. Find out what you need to know about seizures and what to do if your child has one.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/seizure.html/17184860-dea1-4cd4-95ba-3cf34539cd44
Speech-Language TherapyWorking with a certified speech-language pathologist can help a child with speech or language difficulties.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/speech-therapy.html/9bcaa854-6c27-4d01-80c3-176d24a1ac3e
StrokesThis "brain attack" happens when blood flow to the brain stops, even for a second. Often, kids who have a stroke can learn to use their arms and legs and speak again through brain retraining.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/strokes.html/5539d27a-a31c-459d-9bfc-94b934761cda
Word! Occupational TherapyDo you know what your occupation is?https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/word-occupational-therapy.html/a5a9ad58-cf2d-4914-9f5e-bda71dcee940
Word! SeizureYou might hear a seizure called a convulsion, fit, or spell.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/word-seizure.html/70e445af-ba78-41bd-94f7-293962fa407b
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-neurologykh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-neurologyHhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/h/c2d4f543-6c0d-4809-85ed-87a4ce512e91Cerebral Palsy and Related Conditionshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cerebralpalsy-center/cp-relatedconditions/29cde641-247a-4fbf-8342-32f33b10fd2f