A to Z: Hematuria (Blood in Urine)enparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgLearn more about hematuria (blood in urine) and how it's treated.hematuria in infant, hematuria in kids, hematuria in toddlers, hematuria in preschoolers, hematuria in tweens, hematuria in teens, child with blood in urine, dictionary, pee, urine, urinary, utis, urinary infections, urination, kidneys, bladder, ureter, a to z, definitions, hemuturia, blood in urine, bloody urine, red urine, blood in pee, peeing blood, bloody pee09/06/201204/04/201909/02/20196795b2ee-9f7b-4ed7-b843-6a43ec4e2024https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-hematuria.html/<p><em>May also be called: Blood in Urine</em></p> <p>Hematuria (say: hee-ma-TUR-ee-uh)&nbsp;means there is blood in the urine (pee).</p> <h3><strong>More to Know</strong></h3> <p>Blood in the urine often comes from somewhere in the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/kidneys-urinary.html/">urinary tract</a>, which includes the kidneys, bladder, ureters (tube-like structures that connect the kidneys to the bladder), and the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body).</p> <p>The blood may make the urine appear pink, red, or tea-colored. Other times, the blood is invisible to the naked eye and is only seen when a urine sample is viewed under a microscope. (This is called "microscopic hematuria.")</p> <p>Common causes of blood in the urine include <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/">urinary tract infections (UTIs)</a>, kidney stones, irritation of the urethra, injuries, and vigorous exercise. There are many less common causes, and sometimes blood appears in the urine even though there is no underlying problem.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>Hematuria is a common condition that requires medical attention. To determine the cause of the hematuria, a doctor might order several tests, including <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/labtest7.html/">urine tests</a>, blood tests, an ultrasound, a CT scan, or others. If a problem is found, your doctor will either treat it or refer your child to a specialist.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
A to Z: GlomerulonephritisGlomerulonephritis is an inflammation of the glomeruli, the parts of the filtering units (nephrons) of the kidney.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-glomerulonephritis.html/ae67534f-2754-46bf-b301-5ae7b8fbf631
Blood in the Urine (Hematuria)Hematuria is pretty common, and most of the time it's not serious. Find out what causes blood in the urine and what to do about it.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/hematuria.html/1a7a52a4-6c14-4897-87a4-eeeb3d3cd0b1
GlomerulonephritisWith glomerulonephritis, tiny filtering units in the kidneys stop working properly, causing problems like too much fluid in the body and swelling. Most of the time it can be treated. Find out more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/glomerulonephritis.html/a3bf3907-d553-460e-92a5-ecbae0da926d
Kidneys and Urinary TractThe kidneys perform several functions that are essential to health, the most important of which are to filter blood and produce urine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidneys.html/d0d97a22-7118-4082-acae-02dd5319be95
Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related ConditionsRecurrent urinary tract infections can cause kidney damage if left untreated, especially in kids under age 6. Here's how to recognize the symptom of UTIs and get help for your child.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/recurrent-uti-infections.html/879c8981-5f68-4043-9679-090edaf99dc9
Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder)A renal ultrasound makes images of your child's kidneys, ureters, and bladder. Doctors may order this test if they suspect kidney damage, cysts, tumors, kidney stones, or complications from urinary tract infections.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/renal-ultrasound.html/05b3083e-733a-40c6-9fd9-5a38877ccc4f
Urinary Tract InfectionsA urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common reasons that teens visit a doctor. Learn about the symptoms of UTIs, how they're treated, and more in this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/uti.html/a97f6174-4629-4696-b5bc-a461856cdd95
Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in kids. They're easy to treat and usually clear up in a week or so.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/6a6f9f52-f903-4360-877f-dd35d531d84f
Urine TestsIs your child having a urine culture or urinalysis performed? Find out why urine tests are performed, and what to expect when the doctor orders them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/labtest7.html/d8a510e5-7cb2-4868-9e5e-02f65dfb9f45
Your KidneysYou need at least one kidney to live. Find out why in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/kidneys.html/e8b731bd-422b-4032-952a-5f2223257f23
Your Urinary SystemYou pee every day, but what makes it happen? Find out in this article for kids about the urinary system.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/pee.html/6715ddc0-cd8e-428a-afd4-e3e3db22267f
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