A to Z: Hematemesisenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgLearn more about diseases and conditions of the stomach and digestive system.Hematemesis, digestive system, stomach, esophagus, duodenum, peptic ulcers, gastrointestinal tract, upper GI tract, abdominal injuries, vomiting, vomiting of blood, GERD, gastroesophageal reflux disease10/11/201204/04/201909/02/20195b8cea60-30d4-473e-a8af-17231bfb89fchttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-hematemesis.html/<p><em>May also be called: Vomiting of Blood</em></p> <p>Hematemesis (hee-muh-TEM-uh-sis) is bloody vomit or vomit that looks like coffee grounds. Hematemesis is a sign that someone is bleeding in his or her upper <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/digestive.html/">gastrointestinal (GI) tract</a>.</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>Food enters the stomach through the esophagus and exits through the duodenum, which is the first part of&nbsp;the small intestine. This is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Stomach ulcers, abdominal injuries, overuse of some medications, and certain diseases and conditions can all cause bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract.</p> <p>If there is enough <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/blood.html/">blood</a>, it can cause hematemesis. When vomiting occurs, the blood will be bright red if it is fresh, or look like coffee grounds if it has been in the stomach for some time.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>Hematemesis should be considered an emergency and needs to be&nbsp;treated immediately. Fortunately, many causes of hematemesis clear up on their own, and the majority of cases can be treated effectively without surgery.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
Digestive SystemThe digestive process starts even before the first bite of food. Find out more about the digestive system and how our bodies break down and absorb the food we eat.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/digestive.html/f2005e0d-6586-4e09-94e7-65388be2bb40
First Aid: VomitingVomiting can be caused by many things, most commonly gastroenteritis (the "stomach flu"). Here's what to do when your child throws up.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/vomiting-sheet.html/a510f112-6183-4c79-9463-b55e0d3ae7d4
Helicobacter pyloriH. pylori bacteria can cause digestive illnesses, including gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/h-pylori.html/de8ded73-3d39-47b3-a1ba-9404b2011122
Peptic UlcersMany people think that spicy foods cause ulcers, but the truth is that bacteria are the main culprit. Learn more about peptic ulcers.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/peptic-ulcers.html/d1fea5a9-4989-42dc-b240-dfd8be814e0d
UlcersDoctors once thought that stress, spicy foods, and alcohol caused most stomach ulcers. But ulcers are actually caused by a particular bacterial infection, by certain medications, or from smoking. Read all about ulcers.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/ulcers.html/cd11f639-3444-47e4-ad4f-e614479a4f6a
VomitingMost vomiting is caused by gastroenteritis, and usually isn't serious. These home-care tips can help prevent dehydration.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/vomit.html/20a54ee4-1e9e-4822-9631-614f8e08d622
What's Puke?Did you ever toss your cookies? That means throw up, or puke. It's gross, but just about everyone has done it. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/puke.html/fcbff5db-60b4-469d-a5de-c57a805b60e1
X-Ray Exam: AbdomenAn abdominal X-ray can help find the cause of many abdominal problems, such as pain, kidney stones, intestinal blockage, a hole in the intestine, or an abdominal mass such as a tumor.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/xray-abdomen.html/9bff6dae-3d53-4392-988b-4c09372f0c58
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-gastroenterologykh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-gastroenterologyHhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/h/c2d4f543-6c0d-4809-85ed-87a4ce512e91