A to Z: Gestational Diabetesenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-KH-AZ-Dictionary-enHD.jpgGestational diabetes is a kind of diabetes that happens to pregnant women. Most of the time, it goes away after the mom has her baby.pregnant, pregnancy, diabetes, diabetic, glucose, blood, sugar, insulin03/24/201604/01/201909/02/201948c2ed78-2a27-4001-a9e4-451734914e8ehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-gestational-diabetes.html/<p><em>May also be called: Diabetes of Pregnancy</em></p> <p>Gestational (jeh-STAY-shun-ul) diabetes is a kind of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/diabetes-center.html/">diabetes</a>&nbsp;that happens to pregnant women. Most of the time, it goes away after the mom has her baby.</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>Women often find out they have gestational diabetes between weeks 24 and 28 of a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/pregnancy-center.html/">pregnancy</a>. Doctors suspect a woman might have it when she has high levels of sugar in her blood or urine during pregnancy.&nbsp;</p> <p>Diabetes can cause problems for both babies and moms. Most of the time, women can control gestational diabetes with a healthy food plan and daily <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/exercising-pregnancy.html/">exercise</a>. Some women also need to take daily insulin shots and test their blood sugar for the rest of their pregnancy.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>Gestational diabetes usually goes away after a baby is born. Some women will have it again during future pregnancies. Some women who have gestational diabetes will get diabetes when they're older.</p> <p><em><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.4em;">All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</span></em></p>
Blood Test: GlucoseThe blood glucose test, which measures the amount of sugar in the blood, may be done as part of a routine physical or to help diagnose diabetes.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-glucose.html/ca91bc44-6e9e-49c3-a43f-c13ea3e042ef
Prenatal Tests: FAQsEvery parent-to-be hopes for a healthy baby, but it can be hard not to worry. Find out what tests can keep you informed of your health — and your baby's — throughout pregnancy.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/prenatal-tests.html/eb018543-49a4-48cd-9ba3-42e027966273
What Is Gestational Diabetes?Find out what the experts have to say.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/gestational-diabetes.html/41577abc-686a-452e-a891-e76a1b4501f9
What's a "High-Risk" Pregnancy?Find out what the experts have to say.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/high-risk.html/56b19921-0f96-45c7-93cb-c3f092b4cdf0
When Your Baby’s Born PrematurePremature infants, known as preemies, come into the world earlier than full-term infants. They have many special needs that make their care different from other babies.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/preemies.html/bba322bb-f2ec-4128-a331-b6d97eb4d544
kh:age-NAkh:clinicalDesignation-obgynkh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-obgynGhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/g/913c41ca-555f-4809-b0b6-47479a8abc65