A to Z: Epididymitisenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgEpididymitis refers to swelling and inflammation of the epididymis, the coiled tube at the back of the testicle that holds and carries sperm.epididymitis, epididymis, male reproductive system, swelling, swollen, testicle, testicles, testes, STI, STD, urinary tract, urine, CD1Primary Care, CD1Adolescent Medicine02/18/201304/01/201909/02/20194f5a8668-c5c8-4f71-8d85-bda5a510bc8ehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-epididymitis.html/<p>Epididymitis (ep-uh-di-duh-MY-tiss) refers to swelling and inflammation of the epididymis, the coiled tube at the back of the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/male-reproductive.html/">testicle</a> that holds and carries sperm.</p> <p><img title="illustration" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/P-epididymitisA-415x233-enIL.png" alt="illustration" name="4953-EPIDIDYMITIS_A_ENIL.PNG" /></p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>The most common cause of epididymitis is an infection, sometimes a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/talk-child-stds.html/">sexually transmitted disease (STD)</a> (also called sexually transmitted infection or STI) like <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/chlamydia.html/">chlamydia</a>. Urinary tract abnormalities, procedures, and infections also can lead to epididymitis.</p> <p>Symptoms can include swelling; pain; redness; a heavy sensation of the scrotum; fever; discharge; and pain with urination, defecation, or ejaculation.</p> <p>In addition to a physical exam, the doctor might have done <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/labtest7.html/">urine tests</a>, blood tests, an ultrasound or other imaging study, and/or a swab of the urethra in order to diagnose epididymitis.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>Epididymitis usually gets better with antibiotic treatment and rest. Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the condition, but usually involves antibiotics to treat an infection, as well as rest, elevation, and icing of the scrotum.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
ChlamydiaChlamydia is an STD that often has no symptoms, so lots of people can have it and not know it. Read this article to learn how to protect yourself.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/std-chlamydia.html/e9777e46-0637-4373-bee9-ef53c37c9c41
How to Do a Testicular Self-Exam (Slideshow)The testicular self-examination (TSE) is an easy way for guys to check their own testicles to make sure there aren't any unusual lumps or bumps - which are usually the first sign of testicular cancer.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/tse.html/d44c67a3-cce7-4a31-b6ac-c8564497811b
Male Reproductive SystemWhat makes up a guy's reproductive system and how does it develop? Find the answers to these questions and more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/male-repro.html/21b6e702-69bb-4148-bf8b-f0bff571173a
Testicular ExamsIf you're a guy, you may be wondering why the doctor needs to do a testicular exam. Find out in this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/testicles.html/a2ed6b51-ca2d-49d2-bd62-91a97cce1928
Testicular InjuriesSerious testicular injuries are relatively uncommon, but testicular injury can be painful. Read this to find out what steps you can take to protect yourself from injury.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/testicular-injuries.html/333a4cf6-8538-48a8-b511-ff63eb487a32
Testicular TorsionThis emergency condition happens when the spermatic cord gets twisted and cuts off blood supply, causing pain and swelling. Find out what to do in this article for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/torsion.html/dd181175-350a-4289-9252-fe58ab70e811
Ultrasound: ScrotumDoctors order a scrotal ultrasound when they're concerned about symptoms such as scrotal pain or swelling.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ultrasound-scrotal.html/aa69b36d-84f5-4bc3-b7b3-0a08fc28d05c
Undescended TesticlesShortly before birth, a boy's testicles usually descend into the scrotum. When a testicle doesn't make the move, this is called cryptorchidism, or undescended testicles.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cryptorchidism.html/329230c8-7371-4fc2-82c1-61e63cf14f53
VaricoceleA varicocele is an enlargement of the veins in the scrotum. Although there is no way to prevent a varicocele, it usually needs no special treatment.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/varicocele.html/102c678d-6e44-46bc-a9a6-f093f3118f80
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-generalPediatricskh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-adolescentMedicineEhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/e/34af12b6-37ba-4ac1-832b-0a01518fb22bhttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/P-epididymitisA-415x233-enIL.png