A to Z: Cystitisenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgLearn about cystitis (inflammation of the bladder, commonly called a bladder infection). It is the most common type of urinary tract infection (UTI).cystitis, inflammation of the bladder, bladder infection, acute bladder infection, acute bacterial cystitis, urinary tract infection, UTI, kidney damage, kidney infection, E. coli, CD1Urology, CD1Primary Care02/18/201303/25/201909/02/20192685d4e0-60ee-4abc-a1ac-ae35f4fda15fhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-cystitis.html/<p>Cystitis (sis-TYE-tis) is inflammation of the bladder, also known as a bladder infection. It's the most common type of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/">urinary tract infection (UTI)</a> and mostly affects children and adult women.</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>Cystitis is usually caused by bacteria (typically <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ecoli.html/">E. coli</a>) that enter the body through the urethra and spread to the bladder. If not treated, the infection can travel to the kidneys and become a more serious problem.</p> <p><img title="illustration" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/bladderGirl6YO-415x233-enIL.png" alt="urinary tract" name="4871-BLADDERGIRL6YO_A_ENIL" /></p> <p>Cystitis can occur in people who are otherwise healthy and have no medical problems. Irritants such as bubble baths or feminine hygiene products, poor toilet or hygiene habits, an abnormality in the structure or function of the urinary tract, drug interactions, or long-term catheter use all can cause a bladder infection.</p> <p>Symptoms of cystitis include a persistent urge to urinate (pee), a burning sensation when urinating, cloudy or strong-smelling urine, low-grade <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/fever.html/">fever</a>, and a feeling of pressure or pain in the lower abdomen.</p> <p>Wetting accidents in toilet-trained children often indicate cystitis. For infants and young children, cystitis may be harder to detect because symptoms are less specific. Sometimes fever is the only sign.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>Bladder infections are painful and inconvenient, but most are caused by bacteria and can easily be treated with antibiotics. If you have blood in your urine, pain with urination, back or side pain, fever, nausea or vomiting, or abdominal pain, see your doctor immediately as these are signs of a possible infection in the urinary tract.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
BedwettingBedwetting is an issue that millions of families face every night. Most of the time it's not a sign of any deeper medical or emotional issues and kids eventually grow out of it.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/enuresis.html/941a938e-c825-4bf3-8b74-f8cb0a4051f2
First Aid: Pain With Urinating (Peeing)When it hurts to pee, a urinary tract infection (UTI) is usually to blame. But there are other causes. Here's what to do.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urination-pain-sheet.html/19085bc9-3c9c-4a81-abdc-681e16669fc7
Kidneys and Urinary TractThe kidneys perform several functions that are essential to health, the most important of which are to filter blood and produce urine.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/kidneys.html/d0d97a22-7118-4082-acae-02dd5319be95
Urinary Tract InfectionsA urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common reasons that teens visit a doctor. Learn about the symptoms of UTIs, how they're treated, and more in this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/uti.html/a97f6174-4629-4696-b5bc-a461856cdd95
Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in kids. They're easy to treat and usually clear up in a week or so.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/urinary.html/6a6f9f52-f903-4360-877f-dd35d531d84f
Urine Test: Automated Dipstick UrinalysisAutomated dipstick urinalysis results may point to a urinary tract infection (UTI) or injury, kidney disease, or diabetes.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-auto-ds.html/1150df63-c85a-46ce-83b7-08579c781753
Urine Test: Routine CultureA urine culture is used to diagnose a urinary tract infection (UTI) and determine what kinds of germs are causing it.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/test-urine.html/f3af71b9-55f8-4c26-9585-51a0ddb9581b
Why Am I Getting Urinary Tract Infections?Find out what the experts have to say!https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/utis.html/a94f6c10-1211-49af-a327-589ab64f15e3
Your Urinary SystemYou pee every day, but what makes it happen? Find out in this article for kids about the urinary system.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/pee.html/6715ddc0-cd8e-428a-afd4-e3e3db22267f
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-urologykh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-urologyChttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/c/fdabc7bf-e1f5-4c6b-9f0b-00e1f3eac955https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/bladderGirl6YO-415x233-enIL.png