A to Z: Cryptorchidismenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgCryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both of a boy's testicles (testes) have not moved into their proper place in the scrotum.undescended testicle, testicles, testis, testes, cryptorchid, cryptorchidism, abdomen, scrotum, orchiopexy, male reproductive system11/06/201203/25/201909/02/2019f4663584-243f-4923-bf02-4f4bbea9678ahttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-cryptorchidism.html/<p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/"><img class="right" title="Parents image" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-atoZDictionary-enBT.jpg" alt="A to Z Dictionary 500 Go" name="5093-P_ATOZDICTIONARY2_ENBT.JPG" /></a></p> <p><strong>May also be called: Undescended Testicle; Undescended Testis; Undescended Testes</strong></p> <p>Cryptorchidism (krip-TOR-kih-diz-um), also known as <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cryptorchidism.html/">undescended</a> testis, is a condition in which one or both of a boy&rsquo;s testicles (testes) have not moved into their proper place in the scrotum.</p> <p><img title="illustration" src="https://kidshealth.org/ES/images/illustrations/undescendedTestA-415x233-esIL.png" alt="illustration" name="4936-UNDESCENDEDTEST_A_ENIL.PNG" /></p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>A baby boy's <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/male-reproductive.html/">testes</a> (testicles) develop in his abdomen before birth. Usually, the testes drop, or descend, from the baby's abdomen into the scrotum shortly before birth. If this does not happen, the baby is born with cryptorchidism, also called undescended testis. Most cases involve one testicle, but occasionally both testes can be undescended.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>If the testis doesn't does not drop to the usual location by the time a baby is 6 months old, surgery is required. Orchiopexy (or-kee-oh-PEK-see) is a common outpatient procedure to correct an undescended testicle (testis).</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
Male Reproductive SystemUnderstanding the male reproductive system and what it does can help you better understand your son's reproductive health.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/male-reproductive.html/7c0d5bed-bfc7-4f0e-844f-355a4a5f61b0
Testicular TorsionThis emergency condition causes extreme genital pain and usually requires surgery to save a boy's testicle. If your son has groin pain, get him to a doctor right away.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/torsion.html/35ac0f83-e89f-4b0a-8010-2a2d029920b6
Undescended TesticlesShortly before birth, a boy's testicles usually descend into the scrotum. When a testicle doesn't make the move, this is called cryptorchidism, or undescended testicles.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cryptorchidism.html/329230c8-7371-4fc2-82c1-61e63cf14f53
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-urologykh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-urologyChttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/c/fdabc7bf-e1f5-4c6b-9f0b-00e1f3eac955https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-atoZDictionary-enBT.jpghttps://kidshealth.org/ES/images/illustrations/undescendedTestA-415x233-esIL.png