A to Z: Cleft Palate With Cleft Lip, Unilateralenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgA cleft palate with a unilateral cleft lip is a common birth defect in which a baby's lip and palate (roof of mouth) don't form properly. As a result there is a split or opening (cleft) on one side of the lip that can extend all the way from the nose to the back of the palate.Cleft palate, cleft palate with unilateral cleft lip, cleft lip, orofacial clefts, common birth defects, feeding difficulties, dental abnormalities, speech difficulties08/14/201308/11/201609/02/20197f7a7643-dc9b-4b07-b485-0994601d641fhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-cleft-palate-unilateral.html/<h1><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/"><img src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-atoZDictionary-enBT.jpg" alt="A to Z Dictionary 500 Go" class="right" title="Parents image" name="5093-P_ATOZDICTIONARY2_ENBT.JPG" /></a>A to Z: Cleft Palate With Cleft Lip, Unilateral</h1> <p>A <a class="kh_anchor">cleft palate</a> with a unilateral cleft lip is a common <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/birth-defects.html/">birth defect</a> in which a baby's lip and palate (roof of mouth) don't form properly. As a result, there is a split or opening (cleft) on one side of the lip that can extend all the way from the nose to the back of the palate.</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>Cleft lip and cleft palate are called orofacial clefts. Because the lips and the palate develop separately, a child can be born with a cleft lip only, cleft palate only, or both.</p> <p>Sometimes a cleft occurs as part of a syndrome, meaning there are other birth defects. Other times, it's <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/about-genetics.html/">genetic</a> and runs in families. A cleft also can be associated with environmental factors, such as a woman's use of certain medications, exposure to cigarette smoke, or lack of certain vitamins while pregnant. Most of the time, though, the cause isn't known.</p> <p>Cleft lip and cleft palate can be associated with other problems, including feeding difficulties, fluid buildup in the middle ear and hearing loss, dental abnormalities, and speech difficulties.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>The good news is that cleft palate with unilateral cleft lip is treatable. Most babies born with orofacial clefts can have surgery to repair the defect within their first year, and will go on to lead normal, healthy lives. They may, however, need to have additional surgeries as they grow older.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
A to Z: Cleft Lip, BilateralLearn about bilateral cleft lip, a common birth defect in which a baby's lip doesn't form properly, resulting in splits (clefts) on both sides of the lip.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-cleft-bilateral.html/fd572e65-ecd1-4be5-8413-a6267e90a1d7
A to Z: Cleft Lip, UnilateralLearn about unilateral cleft lip, a common birth defect in which a baby's lip doesn't form properly, resulting in a split (cleft) on one side of the lip.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-cleft-unilateral.html/1279dc45-b155-418a-8b13-da51193f9639
A to Z: Cleft Palate With Cleft Lip, BilateralA cleft palate with a bilateral cleft lip is a common birth defect in which a baby's lip and palate (roof of mouth) don't form properly. As a result there is a split or opening (cleft) on both sides of the lip that can extend all the way from the nose to the back of the palate.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-cleft-palate-bilateral.html/93896b28-aa69-4091-b9bf-756dbf580edd
Birth DefectsSome birth defects are minor and cause no problems; others cause major disabilities. Learn about the different types of birth defects, and how to help prevent them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/birth-defects.html/eeaa74ff-3f65-4df3-8757-9df2d014c2ee
Going to a Speech TherapistYou might visit a speech therapist if you're having trouble speaking or understanding others. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/speech-therapist.html/949b7d74-02e5-451d-b374-bf774e71c3de
Mouth and TeethDid you know that your mouth is the first step in the body's digestive process? Or that the mouth and teeth are essential for speech? Learn about the many roles your mouth and teeth play.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/mouth-teeth.html/5a8e1bcb-2da9-4821-8214-788f464d2742
Plastic SurgeryLots of images may come to mind when you think of plastic surgery. This special type of surgery involves a person's appearance and ability to function.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/plastic-surgery.html/28683383-7c39-4693-b5c3-440da04e2b6a
Prenatal Genetic CounselingGenetic counselors work with people who are either planning to have a baby or are pregnant to determine whether they carry the genes for certain inherited disorders. Find out more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/genetic-counseling.html/ce3b2896-0a32-4c87-aa11-b2a7da9d790b
Speech-Language TherapyWorking with a certified speech-language pathologist can help a child with speech or language difficulties.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/speech-therapy.html/9bcaa854-6c27-4d01-80c3-176d24a1ac3e
What Happens in the Operating Room?Surgeries and operations happen in the operating room, sometimes called the OR. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/or.html/ea87f183-35c5-4615-a870-95356281f889
When Your Baby Has a Birth DefectIf your child has a birth defect, you don't have to go it alone - many people and resources are available to help you.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/baby-has-birth-defect.html/9c0573a4-68a2-4d7d-a868-26999e332361
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