A to Z: Cellulitisenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgLearn more about cellulitis, an infection of the skin and underlying tissues.cellulitis, infection, inflammation, skin, tissue, fever, chills, muscle aches, bites, antibiotics, skin infections, cuts, wounds, bites, scrapes, bacteria, infected skin, red skin11/26/201203/25/201909/02/2019dc6df492-c7cd-45f2-be68-8d27774d861fhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-cellulitis.html/<p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/"><img class="right" title="Parents image" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-atoZDictionary-enBT.jpg" alt="A to Z Dictionary 500 Go" name="5093-P_ATOZDICTIONARY2_ENBT.JPG" /></a></p> <p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cellulitis.html/">Cellulitis</a> (sel-yu-LY-tis) is an infection of the skin and underlying tissues.</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>Cellulitis happens when bacteria enter the body through an area of broken skin, like a cut, scratch, or bite. It often affects the face and lower leg, but can develop on any area of the body.</p> <p>Cellulitis begins as a small red area of inflamed skin that is painful and warm to the touch. As the infection spreads, the red area grows and often fever, chills, and muscle aches develop.</p> <p>It's important to see a doctor as soon as cellulitis symptoms are recognized, especially in the case of <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/bites.html/">bites</a>. Cellulitis can be successfully treated with antibiotics, but if untreated could become life threatening. If the infection is spreading quickly and is accompanied by a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/fever.html/">fever</a>, go to the emergency room immediately.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>Protecting skin from cuts, bruises, and scrapes can help prevent cellulitis. When wounds do occur, wash the affected site well with soap and water, apply an antibiotic ointment, and cover the injured area&nbsp;with an adhesive bandage.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
Bites and ScratchesAnimal bites and scratches, even minor ones, can become infected and spread bacteria to other parts of the body, regardless of whether the animal is a family pet or a wild animal.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/bites.html/4e8ac3d1-8055-40c3-8a28-6e240da58db1
CellulitisCellulitis is a skin infection that involves areas of tissue just below the skin's surface. It can affect any part of the body, but it's most common on exposed areas, such as the face, arms, or lower legs.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/cellulitis.html/11d03e5b-f1ac-42bc-95b9-8ed4436e5326
Dealing With CutsFind out how to handle minor cuts at home - and when to get medical care for a more serious injury.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/bleeding.html/dd98d89c-e30e-4b99-8178-bb65cc8e9c3d
First Aid: CutsMost cuts can be safely treated at home. But deeper cuts - or any wounds that won't stop bleeding - need emergency medical treatment.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cuts-sheet.html/e612779f-fd61-449d-947f-c96066443829
Skin, Hair, and NailsOur skin protects the network of tissues, muscles, bones, nerves, blood vessels, and everything else inside our bodies. Hair and nails are actually modified types of skin.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/skin-hair-nails.html/ff7f1929-9dfc-404b-91a9-b45e51633223
Staph InfectionsWhen skin is punctured or broken for any reason, staph bacteria can enter the wound and cause an infection. But good hygiene can prevent many staph infections. Learn more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/staphylococcus.html/eb617e21-017c-44ab-bc1e-dfa5f4e8cd05
TetanusTetanus is a bacterial infection that grows in a contaminated wound. Because it can be serious, it's important to get immunized. Find out more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/tetanus.html/f5369583-ec3a-4542-a901-8e0ee2ce7f72
Wound Drainage CultureDoctors order wound drainage cultures when they suspect wounds are infected.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/wound-culture.html/bbce2001-ae3d-4a2c-bda5-45a15e1ecbf0
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-dermatologykh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-gastroenterologyAndNutritionWeightManagementChttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/c/fdabc7bf-e1f5-4c6b-9f0b-00e1f3eac955https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-atoZDictionary-enBT.jpg