A to Z: Bulimiaenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgLearn about eating disorders and complications of negative thoughts about eating, food, and body image.Bulimia, bulimia nervosa, eating disorders, binge eating, purging, laxatives, diuretics, weight-loss medications, forced vomiting, stomach pain, tooth decay, stomach damage, kidney damage, loss of periods, heart problems, kidney failure, malnutrition, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, nutritional counseling, body image11/13/201303/22/201909/02/2019170ad7a1-1d57-4525-8ac5-fbbeb1fbd922https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-bulimia.html/<p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/"><img class="right" title="Parents image" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-atoZDictionary-enBT.jpg" alt="A to Z Dictionary 500 Go" name="5093-P_ATOZDICTIONARY2_ENBT.JPG" /></a></p> <p><strong>May also be called: Bulimia Nervosa</strong></p> <p>Bulimia (BOO-lee-mee-uh) is an <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/eating-disorders.html/">eating disorder</a> characterized by habitual binge eating and purging, such as by self-induced vomiting or laxative use.</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>Generally, eating disorders involve self-critical, negative thoughts and feelings about body weight and food, and eating habits that disrupt normal body function and daily activities. People with bulimia typically respond to those negative thoughts by binge eating (eating abnormally large amounts of food over a short period of time) and then purging the food eaten by vomiting, fasting, exercising excessively, or using laxatives, diuretics, or weight-loss medications in order to keep from gaining weight.</p> <p>With bulimia, frequent vomiting and lack of nutrition can cause stomach pain, damage to the <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/digestive.html/">stomach</a> and kidneys, tooth decay, and loss of periods in girls. Over time, bulimia can contribute to serious complications, such as heart problems, kidney failure, severe malnutrition, and even death. In addition, bulimia is often associated with mental health conditions like <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/anxiety-disorders.html/">anxiety disorders</a>, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and depression.</p> <p>The causes of bulimia aren't entirely clear. However, a combination of psychological, genetic, social, and family factors are thought to be involved. Treatment focuses on helping people with bulimia cope with their disordered eating behaviors and establish new patterns of thinking about and approaching food. This can involve medical supervision, nutritional counseling, and therapy.</p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>Overcoming bulimia can be challenging, but most people with the condition eventually get better with treatment. In addition to therapy, support groups can help change negative perceptions about weight and body image. Encouraging healthy attitudes about food and exercise can go a long way toward preventing bulimia in the first place.</p> <p><em>All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts.</em></p>
A Guy's Guide to Body ImageMany people think of guys as being carefree when it comes to appearance. But guys spend plenty of time in front of the mirror. And some worry just as much as girls do about their looks.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/male-bodyimage.html/1c60a19e-cb69-4513-9d9f-df1b2d7e8045
A to Z: Anorexia NervosaLearn about anorexia nervosa, a type of eating disorder.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-anorexia.html/e5af7954-481b-48cf-9a12-fb2e6aa559cc
Binge Eating DisorderBinge eating is a type of eating disorder. This article for teens explains what it is, how to recognize it, and how to get help.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/binge-eating.html/1b7bc688-9350-42c2-9a91-be12cbe09fd0
Body Dysmorphic DisorderFor some people, worries about appearance become extreme and upsetting, interfering with their lives, a condition called body dysmorphic disorder.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/body-image-problem.html/3171d598-f999-4481-a898-f300b4aedc8c
Body Image and Self-EsteemWhen your body changes, so can your image of yourself. Find out how your body image affects your self-esteem and what you can do.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/body-image.html/7149667b-50a9-40d9-bee3-57800969b218
Compulsive ExerciseEven though exercise has many positive benefits, too much can be harmful. Teens who exercise compulsively are at risk for both physical and psychological problems.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/compulsive-exercise.html/57728848-9e48-4724-8268-8faa34c0e1c9
DepressionDepression is very common. For more information about depression and feeling better, check out this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/depression.html/313901c9-c72a-4f03-831b-94ab61da2856
Eating DisordersEating disorders are common among teens and kids, especially young women. Read about the warning signs, prevention strategies, and ways to help a child with an eating disorder.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/eating-disorders.html/0d56cfd0-b454-4f23-9fa2-0c7fae102171
Encouraging a Healthy Body ImageA healthy and positive body image means liking your body, appreciating it, and feeling grateful for its qualities and capabilities. Parents can help kids develop a healthy body image.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/body-image.html/df88d420-5c9a-4744-8739-3cdb85f1519c
Female Athlete TriadFemale athlete triad is a combination of three conditions: disordered eating, amenorrhea (loss of a girl's period), and osteoporosis (a weakening of the bones).https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/triad.html/660b8bc9-8181-412e-a420-cbf191295794
Finding Low-Cost Mental Health CareIf you need mental health care but don't think you can afford it, you're not alone. Get tips on finding low-cost or free mental health care in this article for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/mhealth-care.html/1d8bc05d-7696-4dda-910b-0d06f3855508
Help! Is This My Body?Your body's changing - and if you've ever felt out of step with it, you're not alone. Find out how to deal with body changes and feelings in this article.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/help-body.html/d6b33158-b043-4e98-a009-e6e3271d65d7
Obsessive-Compulsive DisorderAll kids have worries and doubts. But some have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in which their worries compel them to behave in certain ways over and over again. OCD can get better with the right attention and care.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ocd.html/344575a2-b6b9-4cfc-b608-804289308f3c
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)Someone might say you're obsessed with soccer or something else that you really like, but when someone has a true obsession, it isn't any fun. Find out more about obsessive-compulsive disorder in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/ocd.html/2b0591fe-5ed3-45da-ac1e-0271b01af085
Sadness and DepressionEveryone is sad once in a while. But depression is a sadness that goes on too long and hurts too much. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/depression.html/f5bae932-e007-4fc5-b712-271e8bdff1ab
Taking Your Child to a TherapistMany children and teens have problems that affect how they feel, act, or learn. Going to therapy helps them cope better, feel better, and do better.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/finding-therapist.html/36c31f3c-0467-4e71-8c7e-c6274c9f2c8f
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-behavioralHealthkh:clinicalDesignation-gastroenterologyAndNutritionWeightManagementkh:genre-dictionarykh:primaryClinicalDesignation-behavioralHealthBhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/b/b18a8d60-0908-4738-a137-dbbebbbcca74https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-atoZDictionary-enBT.jpg