A to Z: Anaphylaxisenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-khAZDictionary-enHD-AR1.jpgAnaphylaxis is a sudden, life-threatening reaction that is usually caused by an allergy.anaphylaxis, allergy, allergies, allergic reaction, epi, epinephrine, allergen, insect sting, food, medicine, medication, immune system, itch, red skin, swelling, swollen, breathing trouble, trouble breathing11/13/201303/18/201909/02/2019133cec71-2dcc-46d0-9011-9c42b784f1bdhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/az-anaphylaxis.html/<p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dictionary/"><img class="right" title="Parents image" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/buttons/P-atoZDictionary-enBT.jpg" alt="A to Z Dictionary 500 Go" name="5093-P_ATOZDICTIONARY2_ENBT.JPG" /></a></p> <p><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/anaphylaxis.html/">Anaphylaxis</a> is a sudden, life-threatening reaction that is usually caused by an <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/allergies-center.html/">allergy</a>. The most common allergens (things that cause a reaction) are foods, medications, and insect stings.</p> <h3>More to Know</h3> <p>Anaphylaxis does not occur the first time someone comes in contact with an allergen. During the first exposure, the person's <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/immune.html/">immune system</a>, which fights infections and disease, responds to the allergen as if it were a threat. When exposed to the allergen again, the person's body tries to "defend" itself by releasing chemicals into the blood that cause inflammation throughout the body and the severe allergic symptoms known as anaphylaxis.</p> <p>Common anaphylaxis symptoms are itchy or red skin, swelling, trouble breathing, hoarseness, a runny or stuffed nose, throwing up, a fast heartbeat, or passing out. If someone has anaphylaxis more than once, signs may change each time.</p> <p>Treatment for anaphylaxis includes an injection of epinephrine (adrenaline) right away. Other medications like prednisone (a steroid) and antihistamines treat the reaction and usually will be continued for a few days. With prompt treatment, an episode usually ends within an hour, but some can last longer. Sometimes symptoms return without another exposure to the allergen, usually within 10 hours but sometimes up to 3 days later.</p> <p><img title="illustration" src="https://kidshealth.org/EN/images/illustrations/epiHowToCaption-415x233-enIL.png" alt="epinephrine injection illustration" name="4867-EPIHOWTOCAPTION_A_ENIL" /></p> <h3>Keep in Mind</h3> <p>Anaphylaxis can be life threatening, so anyone at risk for it&nbsp;(and all caretakers) should&nbsp;know what to do in an emergency.</p>
5 Ways to Be Prepared for an Allergy EmergencyQuick action is essential during a serious allergic reaction. It helps to remind yourself of action steps so they become second nature if there's an emergency. Here's what to do.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/allergy-emergency.html/d5aa4a48-7679-468c-8e87-905586a85181
5 Ways to Prepare for an Allergy EmergencyBeing prepared for an allergy emergency will help you, your child, and other caregivers respond in the event of a serious reaction.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/allergy-emergency.html/f317a282-5219-4284-a9f4-ee89d7e2a2a6
All About AllergiesMillions of Americans, including many kids, have an allergy. Find out how allergies are diagnosed and how to keep them under control.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/allergy.html/50114e1e-94ae-48c1-8769-b59b60036096
Bug Bites and StingsGenerally, insect bites and stings are harmless. Find out how to keep pests from ruining your fun.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/bug-bites.html/3b3949de-2ab8-470e-871d-35c8e648835d
First Aid: Allergic ReactionsAlthough most allergic reactions aren't serious, severe reactions can be life-threatening and can require immediate medical attention.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/allergic-reaction-sheet.html/59bcd54d-cee6-4f0d-a758-11b1b6c61608
Food AllergiesStruggling with strawberries? Petrified of peanuts? Sorry you ate shellfish? Maybe you have a food allergy. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/food-allergies.html/e56e2bf2-b47d-46d4-886a-4c90accbb7a7
Food Allergies and Food SensitivitiesFind more than 30 articles in English and Spanish about all aspects of food allergies in children.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/center/foodallergies-center.html/d3c22db3-bb92-40fb-ab56-d23fdaf053be
Food Allergies: How to CopeWith food allergies, preventing a reaction means avoiding that food entirely. But sometimes allergens can be hidden in places you don't expect. Here are tips on living with a food allergy.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/food-allergy-coping.html/99fe9b8e-5489-41f1-8843-84ef92b9335f
Going to School With Food AllergiesWith preparation and education, a child with a food allergy can stay safe at school.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/school-foodallergy.html/ede8a68e-bbc1-4179-8d56-febaf2f3861e
Insect Sting AllergyInsect sting allergies can cause serious reactions. Find out how to keep kids safe.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/sting-allergy.html/701e2b97-9880-4ee9-8b38-56ab474a1a9b
Learning About AllergiesDuring an allergic reaction, your body's immune system goes into overdrive. Find out more in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/allergies.html/c4c99b6f-c068-41ef-a755-63be7a2fca42
Nut and Peanut AllergyIf your child is allergic to nuts or peanuts, it's essential to learn what foods might contain them and how to avoid them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/nut-peanut-allergy.html/c40549b0-03e4-4286-87e7-8d5ee4137883
Serious Allergic Reactions (Anaphylaxis)A person with severe allergies can be at risk for a sudden, serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. This reaction can seem scary, but the good news is it can be treated.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/anaphylaxis.html/0a39f182-b6cb-4509-990c-ba3790dad4b8
What's the Difference Between a Food Allergy and a Food Intolerance?Food allergies and food intolerances, like lactose intolerance, are not the same. Find out more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/allergy-intolerance.html/969e0d3e-a4b0-4780-8d7f-7b93bb6d1116
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