Arthrogramenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/KH_generic_header_01_2.jpgAn arthrogram is a test done to look inside a joint for injuries or other problems.arthrography, radiologists, radiology, joints, arthrogram, arthrograms, medical imaging, joints, arthritis, arthropathies, arthropathy, gout10/31/201911/05/201911/05/2019Amy W. Anzilotti, MD11/01/20197938f5a2-66b4-4a89-a599-8787d1a74e77https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/arthrogram.html/<h3>What Is an Arthrogram?</h3> <p>An arthrogram (AR-thruh-gram) is a test done to look inside a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/bones-muscles-joints.html/">joint</a> for injuries or other problems. It takes pictures that give doctors a view of the soft tissue in a joint, which a regular X-ray can't do. This helps them find the cause of problems like joint pain or swelling.</p> <p>Also called arthrography (ar-THROG-ruh-fee), it's usually done to check knee and shoulder joints. Sometimes doctors examine other joints, like the wrist, ankle, hip, or elbow. Less often, doctors do arthrograms to put medicine inside a joint to relieve pain.</p> <h3>How Are Arthrograms Done?</h3> <p>Radiologists (doctors who diagnose and treat problems using medical imaging) do arthrograms. The radiologist will:</p> <ul class="kh_longline_list"> <li>Numb the skin around the joint.</li> <li>Put a thin needle into the joint.</li> <li>Inject contrast dye into the joint to help make the pictures clearer.&nbsp;</li> <li>Take X-rays of the joint in different positions.</li> </ul> <p>If an arthrography is done to give medicine, it's injected into the joint with the needle.</p> <p>Less often, radiologists use an ultrasound, fluoroscopy (a continuous type of X-ray that takes moving pictures), CT scan (a type of X-ray that takes very detailed pictures), or MRI to get the pictures rather than an X-ray.</p> <p>Sometimes doctors do an arthrogram during surgery. The pictures can help them make treatment decisions during the surgery.</p> <p>After the arthrogram, the radiologist looks at the pictures to get more information about the joint. When the test results are ready, your child's doctor will share them with you.</p> <h3>Why Are Arthrograms Done?</h3> <p>Doctors order arthrograms to diagnose and sometimes treat arthropathies. An arthropathy (ar-THROP-uh-thee) is a disease or condition that affects the joints, such as arthritis or gout. Things that can cause one include injuries, infection, autoimmune diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, and crystals forming in a joint.</p> <p>Some arthropathies, like <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/jra.html/">arthritis</a>, can affect almost any joint in the body. Others, such as gout or Charcot joint, usually affect the feet and ankles. Many joint problems are temporary and clear up within a few weeks. But some can last for years or never go away.</p> <p>Treatment may involve medicines or surgery, depending on the problem and its cause. In most cases, finding and treating the condition early can help prevent more joint damage and help a person live a normal life.</p> <h3>How Can Parents Help?</h3> <p>After the test, follow the doctor's instructions for:</p> <ul> <li>how long your child should rest the joint</li> <li>which activities are OK and which to avoid</li> <li>whether it's OK to bear weight on the joint</li> <li>if your child should limit movement of the joint</li> <li>when your child can return to school, sports, and other activities</li> </ul> <p>If your child has pain and the doctor says it's OK, you can give <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/acetaminophen.html/">acetaminophen</a> or <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ibuprofen.html/">ibuprofen</a>. Follow the package directions for how much to give and how often. You also can put a cool compress (such as a washcloth soaked in cool water) on the joint.</p> <p>Your child's joint may make sounds when moved for the next 24&ndash;48 hours. This is from the contrast dye in the joint and is not a reason to worry.</p> <h3>When Should I Call the Doctor?</h3> <p>Call the doctor if your child has:</p> <ul> <li>redness or swelling around the joint</li> <li>a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/fever.html/">fever</a> within 3 days of the arthrogram</li> <li>drainage or bleeding from the injection site that continues for more than 1 day</li> <li>pain that doesn't get better with acetaminophen or ibuprofen or goes on for more than 2 days</li> </ul>Artrografía Una artrografía es una prueba que se hace para observar el interior de una articulación en busca de lesiones y otros problemas.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/arthrogram-esp.html/7c4ebc78-0b8a-41f8-80c9-1f2db527f9c4
ArthrogryposisChildren with arthrogryposis have stiff joints that don't move well. Treatments like splinting, bracing, therapy, and surgery help kids get the best range of motion. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/arthrogryposis.html/2439749f-8fb5-48a2-850e-b0d4d3c802fc
Bones, Muscles, and JointsOur bones, muscles, and joints form our musculoskeletal system and enable us to do everyday physical activities.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/bones-muscles-joints.html/d55a922b-e87a-49e0-82ae-0c5a0773cee9
BursitisBursitis, an irritation of the small fluid sacs that provide cushioning in some joints, is often caused by sports-related injuries or repeated use of a particular joint.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/bursitis.html/35129f6a-a66c-4dce-94c1-890f6ef07812
Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT)Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a neurological disorder. It causes muscle weakness and numbness, most commonly in the arms and legs.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/cmt.html/4572b78c-18df-4d25-b206-35628fbc94d3
How the Joints WorkSee how the joints work.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/how-joints-work.html/e5b8e306-0543-4523-80a2-8cfe2ae8148b
Juvenile Idiopathic ArthritisIn juvenile idiopathic arthritis (also called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis)), a person can develop swollen, warm, and painful joints. Learn more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/jra.html/64ceaa10-23cf-4f1c-b6e0-21bd7cb07b97
Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)Learn about juvenile idiopathic arthritis, a specific kind of arthritis that usually occurs in kids and teens younger than 17.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/juv-rheumatoid-arthritis.html/f118a90b-88e2-491c-bad2-24a8ef6e2144
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-radiologyAndMedicalImagingkh:clinicalDesignation-rheumatologykh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-radiologyAndMedicalImagingArthritis & Rheumatologic Conditionshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/medical/arthritis/89d49e24-724c-4eb6-942a-c1756ae5d7cfMedical Tests & Examshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/medical/b5327501-2bda-444b-8df1-a1af15af79cb