Amebiasisenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-infectAmebiasis-enHD-AR1.jpgAmebiasis is an intestinal illness transmitted when someone eats or drinks something that's contaminated with a microscopic parasite.intestinal amebiasis, amebic dysentery, gastrointestinal illnesses, gastrointestinal diseases, my child has amebiasis, large intestines, bowels, small intestines, livers, bowel movements, diarrhea, runny poop, bloody diarrhea, chills, fevers, hepatic amebiasis, amoebas, hepatitis, abdominal pains, parasites, parasitic infections, stools, contaminated foods, contaminated water supply, unsanitary conditions, hand washing, poor hygiene, contagiousness, tropics, tropical parts of the world, gastrointestinal, gastroenterology, GI03/22/200002/11/201909/02/2019Larissa Hirsch, MD02/11/2019b310b6cc-8a54-4b7d-8101-b84231338943https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/amebiasis.html/<h3>What Is Amebiasis?</h3> <p>Amebiasis (am-uh-BYE-eh-sis) is an infection of the intestines with a <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/germs.html/">parasite</a> called <em>Entamoeba histolytica</em> (<em>E. histolytica</em>). The parasite is an amoeba (uh-MEE-buh), a single-celled organism. People can get this parasite by eating or drinking something that's contaminated with it.</p> <h3>What Are the Signs &amp; Symptoms of Amebiasis?</h3> <p>In many cases, the parasite that causes amebiasis lives in a person's large intestine without causing any symptoms. Other times, it causes:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/diarrhea.html/">diarrhea</a> (which may be bloody)</li> <li>stomach pains</li> <li>cramping</li> <li>nausea</li> <li>loss of appetite</li> <li><a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/fever.html/">fever</a></li> </ul> <p>In rare cases, it can spread into other organs such as the liver, lungs, and brain.</p> <p>For some people, symptoms of amebiasis can begin within days to weeks of swallowing contaminated food or water. For others, symptoms can take months to appear.</p> <h3>How Does Amebiasis Spread?</h3> <p>Amebiasis is contagious. People with amoebas in their intestines can pass the infection to others through stool (poop) even if they have no symptoms. When infected stool contaminates food or water supplies, amebiasis can spread quickly to many people at once. This is especially true in developing countries, where drinking water may be contaminated.</p> <p>Amebiasis also can spread between people when hands aren't washed well, contaminated objects are shared, and by sexual contact.</p> <p>Amebiasis usually happens in areas where living conditions are crowded and unsanitary. The illness is common in parts of Africa, Latin America, and Asia. It is rare in the United States, but is sometimes seen in people who have immigrated from or traveled to countries where amebiasis is more common.</p> <h3>How Can Amebiasis Be Prevented?</h3> <p>Because amoebas may contaminate food and water, you can help prevent the illness by being careful about what you eat and drink, especially in developing countries. In those areas, a good rule regarding food is to cook it, boil it, peel it, or forget it. Ice can also be contaminated and should be avoided in these countries.</p> <p>Everyone should <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/hand-washing.html/">wash their hands</a> well after using the bathroom and before preparing or eating food.</p> <h3>How Is Amebiasis Treated?</h3> <p>Doctors can treat amebiasis with antibiotics . Some people need more treatment, such as extra fluids.</p> <h3>When Should I Call the Doctor?</h3> <p>Call your doctor if anyone in your family has signs or symptoms of amebiasis, such as:</p> <ul> <li>diarrhea with blood or mucus</li> <li>diarrhea that lasts longer than 2 weeks</li> <li>belly pain</li> <li>a fever</li> <li>a swollen belly</li> <li>pain or tenderness in the area of the liver (below the ribs on the right side)</li> </ul> <p>This is especially important if you have recently traveled to a part of the world where amebiasis is common. Also call the doctor if your child has diarrhea and shows signs of being <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/dehydration.html/">dehydrated</a>, such as a dry or sticky mouth, peeing less than usual, no tears when crying, dizziness, or drowsiness.</p>Amebiasis En algunas personas, los síntomas de la amebiasis pueden empezar días o semanas después de ingerir agua o alimentos contaminados. En otras personas, los síntomas pueden tardar meses en aparecer. https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/amebiasis-esp.html/f5c5b1a9-84c5-4f06-bdb4-1a010d6f1511
Campylobacter InfectionsThese bacterial infections can cause diarrhea, cramping, abdominal pain, and fever. Good hand-washing and food safety habits can help prevent them.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/campylobacter.html/1b376c32-47d6-42a6-9eed-50dbd918e201
DiarrheaNearly everybody gets diarrhea every once in a while, and it's usually caused by gastrointestinal infections. It's nothing to be embarrassed about. Read this article to learn more.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/diarrhea.html/a6f9f493-2ca8-437a-b4bb-4909ac75b2fc
Food PoisoningDid you ever eat something that made you feel ooky? It might have been food poisoning.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/food-poisoning.html/0d519fd4-b93a-493c-8916-dea8923d5f22
Food Safety for Your FamilyWhy is food safety important? And how can you be sure your kitchen and the foods you prepare in it are safe?https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/food-safety.html/0caf1e5d-2bda-4ba7-8855-560f9e30f791
Germs: Bacteria, Viruses, Fungi, and ProtozoaGerms are tiny organisms that can cause disease - and they're so small that they can creep into your system without you noticing. Find out how to protect yourself.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/care-about-germs.html/59b8feef-766a-4272-ac83-38140b1d176a
Hand Washing: Why It's So ImportantDid you know that the most important thing you can do to keep from getting sick is to wash your hands? If you don't wash your hands frequently, you can pick up germs from other sources and then infect yourself.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/handwashing.html/83630582-a0c6-4b77-97f9-6b26970fd4af
Salmonella InfectionsSalmonellosis is a foodborne illness caused by the bacteria salmonella. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, fever, and headache.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/salmonellosis.html/fdb3d696-ad27-427b-84fc-8039b5218074
SepsisSepsis is a serious infection usually caused when bacteria make toxins that cause the immune system to attack the body's own organs and tissues.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/sepsis.html/ae008ddb-6b3a-494d-b020-cb6ccbbe8bcb
Staying Healthy While You TravelWhen you're traveling with your kids, there's a chance that someone might get sick. But early planning and smart packing can help ensure your family stays healthy and safe.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/family-travel.html/109b54ad-f945-4862-b3fa-473beaa33789
Stool TestsYour child's doctor may order a stool collection test to check for blood, bacteria, ova, or parasites. Find out how this test is performed and when you can expect the results.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/labtest8.html/74d5d87f-1ab7-4c11-a9bc-126a3da3e933
The 5-Second RuleDid you ever eat something off the floor? Uh-oh. Time to read this article for kids about the 5-second rule.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/5-seconds.html/df9f897f-fa47-4031-89cb-229adac6ce7e
What Are Germs?You know they can hurt you, but what are these invisible creatures? Find out in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/germs.html/cd877075-9d39-4c9a-b4f8-d67cb341050f
Why Do I Need to Wash My Hands?Washing your hands is the best way to stop germs from spreading. Learn all about the best way to wash your hands in this article for kids.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/kids/wash-hands.html/ae19eff8-ac7c-44be-bd9f-b2efe6953f6d
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:clinicalDesignation-infectiousDiseasekh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-infectiousDiseaseParasitic Infections (Worms, Lice, etc.)https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/infections/parasitic/6489d101-bb81-4fcf-ab14-b507a628cf66