When Your Child Outgrows Pediatric Careenparentshttps://kidshealth.org/EN/images/headers/P-outgrowPediatric-enHD-AR1.gifHelp your teen or young adult make the transition from pediatric health care to adult health care. Get tips on finding a new doctor and getting health insurance.finding a new doctor, adult health care, PCP, primary care physician, family care doctor, internist, health insurance, coverage, COBRA, medicaid, SSDI, transitioning of care, teens outgrowing outgrow pediatrician, finding find adult doctor, legal adult, CD1Transition of Care06/18/200910/28/201910/28/2019Cory Ellen Nourie, MSS, MLSP10/21/20197620379f-3ef2-4de7-b9c0-0acda3eb56cfhttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/adult-care.html/<p>It might seem like only yesterday that you stepped into the pediatrician's office for your child's very first visit. But the time will come when your child needs to move into adult health care.</p> <p>This change can be overwhelming for you and your child. But if you're both prepared and plan ahead, it can be a smooth step on the path to adulthood.</p> <h3>Finding a New Doctor</h3> <p>Kids become legal adults at age 18. Then, they can visit an <strong>adult primary care physician</strong> <strong>(PCP)</strong>, such as an internal medicine doctor (internist), a general practitioner, or a family medicine doctor.</p> <p>Pediatricians are trained to care for kids and teens. Some still might provide care for a little longer if a young adult is in college (usually until college graduation or age 21). But this varies from doctor to doctor.</p> <p>Ask your pediatrician for a referral if you don't have a family doctor that your child wants to see or if your child has a chronic condition that will need an adult specialist's care.</p> <p>It may be a challenge to find a PCP or adult specialist if your child has a rare condition, disability, or pediatric-onset condition (one that develops only in childhood). You'll want someone who's comfortable caring for these complex needs. So start searching for doctors early, during the teen years.</p> <p>Ask if your child can see a new doctor for a trial period. Then, follow up with the pediatric specialist to see how things went and put both doctors in touch to plan for the transition of care. Allow plenty of time for this process. That way, if there's an issue your child can continue seeing the pediatric specialist until you find an adult provider who is a better fit.</p> <h3>Choosing Health Care Coverage</h3> <p>If your child is a dependent under your health care coverage, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allows your child to be covered until age 26. It doesn't matter if your child is in college, living at home, employed, or even married. Your child still can be on your policy.</p> <p>If your child is a dependent on your job-based <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/buy-health-insurance.html/">health care plan</a>, coverage will expire on the day your child turns 26. So begin looking for new coverage well before this date.&nbsp;If covered through an ACA Health Insurance Marketplace plan, your child can keep the insurance until December 31 of the year he or she turns 26.</p> <h4>What Options Are Available?</h4> <p>Many employers offer <strong>group health care coverage</strong> as part of their employee benefits package. It lets employees customize a plan that may include dental care, vision care, emergency care, and routine medical care. Long-term disability insurance offers medical benefits for those who are out of work for a long period of time. If offered, it's at an added cost.</p> <p>If insured through an employer, your child will pay:</p> <ul> <li>a monthly fee (premium), based on the number of exemptions claimed</li> <li>any co-pays and out-of-pocket fees that go to health care providers like doctors or pharmacists</li> </ul> <p>What if your adult child is no longer covered under your insurance plan and health coverage is not offered by an employer or spouse's plan? Then, they might be eligible for coverage under <strong>COBRA</strong>, the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. This U.S. mandate requires all health insurance carriers to temporarily extend coverage in a group plan to former dependents for up to 36 months.</p> <p>COBRA does not kick in automatically. Your child must apply for coverage and should do so quickly, as the eligibility period is limited. Premiums will be higher than what your child paid as a dependent on your plan.</p> <p>Your child also can opt for <strong>individual health coverage</strong> through the Marketplace on <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/">HealthCare.gov</a>. Most plans are based on your adult child's income. Many are subsidized to make them more affordable.</p> <h4>Special Considerations</h4> <p>Insurance companies can't turn down people with a pre-existing condition, or charge them more for coverage. If your child has special health care needs, your insurance plan may have an adult disabled child clause. This lets adult children with disabilities stay on a parent's plan indefinitely. Check to see if your insurance company offers this.</p> <p>Those who are disabled before age 22 also may be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). These benefits are offered to disabled children whose parents paid into Social Security throughout their careers. Kids whose parents have died, are retired, or get disability benefits themselves may qualify for benefits. After getting SSDI for 24 months, they're also eligible for the U.S. government's Medicare insurance plan.</p> <p>Adult children who are disabled also may receive coverage through the government's Medicaid program if their incomes fail to cover the cost of medical services, or if they qualify for and/or receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI).</p> <h3>Being a Responsible Patient</h3> <p>Adult health care is based on patient responsibility. With that comes control. So, your child will make all medical decisions and is entitled to privacy about all medical conditions. You won't get that information unless your child chooses to share it with you.</p> <p>It's important for young adults to share their medical information with all their health care providers. This includes previous illnesses, operations, medicines, and immunizations. They should also mention any allergic reactions to medicines, and any family history of disease, like cancer or heart disease.</p> <p>Encourage your son or daughter to keep copies of all <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/ehrs.html/">medical records</a> and an up-to-date list of medicines.</p> <p>And while it's important to see a doctor with a health concern, it's also important to go for regular checkups and screenings. Recommended health screenings are based on your child's personal and family medical history.</p> <h3>Before Your Child Is an Adult</h3> <p>Help your kids start "co-managing" <a href="https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/teen-health-care.html/">their health care</a> during the teen years. Little by little, encourage teens to take an active role. They can schedule appointments and refill prescriptions, for example. This builds self-confidence and also shows parents that their kids can take care of themselves.</p> <p>The move to adult health care won't happen overnight. But planning ahead and talking about what to expect will help kids manage their medical care when the time comes.</p>Cuando su hijo ya es demasiado mayor para seguir yendo al pediatraCuando los chicos se convierten legalmente en adultos, a los 18 años, deben ser atendidos por un médico de cabecera para adultos, es decir, un médico de medicina interna (internista), de medicina general o de familia.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/es/parents/adult-care-esp.html/aa368dc1-ffed-491a-a15a-368af2745acd
Choosing Your Own DoctorYou deserve medical care from someone who helps you feel comfortable and understood. Get tips on finding the best doctor for you.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/own-doctor.html/85e1c956-7aa1-4181-929e-677acdb33b85
Electronic Health RecordsBecause EHRs improve how well your doctors talk to each other and coordinate your treatment, they can enhance your medical care. Get the facts on electronic health records.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/ehr.html/0ac3761b-23ec-4485-8808-7473efadbde5
Financial Management During CrisisAlthough the emotional price of raising a seriously ill child can be devastating, it's only part of the picture. Even during this difficult time, you have to consider the financial implications.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/financial-crisis.html/25fafd2b-5eee-4366-b83f-fae473ee0d46
Financial Planning for Kids With Special NeedsThese 10 steps can help take the anxiety and worry out of your child's financial future and make sure that your child will be taken care of even after you're gone.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/needs-planning.html/7a324c71-2f03-404e-80de-e94bee1e2f04
Finding Low-Cost Mental Health CareIf you need mental health care but don't think you can afford it, you're not alone. Get tips on finding low-cost or free mental health care in this article for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/mhealth-care.html/1d8bc05d-7696-4dda-910b-0d06f3855508
Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care DecisionsInvolving teens in their health care can help prepare them for managing it on their own as adults.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/teen-health-care.html/3a9f2f21-00c2-4755-92cb-a336b5203acf
Health Insurance BasicsTaking charge of your own health care is a big step, and it can be a little overwhelming. Here's a quick crash course on insurance for teens.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/insurance.html/c6993fac-256c-4d61-befb-dbcaaf6397ca
Health Insurance: Cracking the CodeHealth insurance has a language all its own. This article for teens explains what some key terms mean.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/hmo-language.html/80a4854f-4bc9-4cd9-ac1e-282f779cfa3d
How Do I Switch Doctors?Find out what the experts have to say.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/new-doctor.html/88790e41-2056-4530-9d96-4c5eedd14365
How to Fill a PrescriptionTaking responsibility for your own health care means understanding things like prescriptions. Read our tips for teens on filling a prescription.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/rx-filled.html/97c41332-0c93-4150-8c40-fb658ba1399c
How to Find Affordable Health CareFinding coverage for your kids may be difficult, but it's not impossible. Many kids are eligible for government or community programs, even if their parents work. Learn what resources are available to your family.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/find-care.html/bd937742-3ea6-44a2-9f5e-c748935aea39
How to Shop for Health InsuranceThe government's healthcare marketplace, or exchange, is the new way to shop for health insurance. But just how do you find the best coverage and sign up? Get answers here.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/buy-health-insurance.html/06a171ae-2109-4e27-bf32-d86a0f59d57d
Medical Care and Your 13- to 18-Year-OldRegular visits help your teen's doctor keep track of changes in physical, mental, and social development. The doctor can also help your teen understand the importance of choosing a healthy lifestyle.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/medical-care-13-18.html/1802e35d-4e4e-4431-b044-c4d761eecf9b
Refilling a PrescriptionTips and advice for teens on refilling a prescription.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/rx-refills.html/32394a5d-0764-4013-83b1-3ed9f06be1cf
Talking to Your DoctorYour best resource for health information and advice is your doctor - the person who knows you, your medical history, and accurate medical information to answer your questions.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/talk-doctor.html/d70c612b-127b-47b2-a920-b30c5ca1b966
Your Child's Checkup: 18 YearsFind out what this doctor's visit will involve when your son or daughter is 18.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/checkup-18yrs.html/a79a4613-ad0e-4e6d-a6e0-d91b39e1e854
Your Child's Checkup: 19 YearsFind out what this doctor's visit will involve when your son or daughter is 19.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/checkup-19yrs.html/5a3b97f5-8ffe-45db-92fc-0da446929742
Your Child's Checkup: 20 YearsFind out what this doctor's visit will involve when your son or daughter is 20.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/checkup-20yrs.html/fb87c396-c356-4898-b4fa-e8775ecc3a8c
Your Medical RecordsEach time you hop up on a doctor's exam table, somebody makes a note in your medical records. There may come a time when you need your medical information, so find out how to get it and how it's protected.https://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/teens/medical-records.html/b168beee-a537-401c-a7e6-c821d5a26be3
kh:age-allAgesOrAgeAgnostickh:age-teenThirteenToNineteenkh:age-youngAdultEighteenPluskh:clinicalDesignation-adolescentMedicinekh:genre-articlekh:primaryClinicalDesignation-generalPediatricsFamily Lifehttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/positive/family/3d677196-be08-46bb-ab9a-8e1460e9bdf7Checkupshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/checkupsubcat/9ce95f19-e128-447f-9dca-bcb7532253a1Doctor & Hospital Visitshttps://kidshealth.org/ws/RadyChildrens/en/parents/system/doctor/f535fe49-643d-4fb4-ad2a-e20a2f64f48d