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  • Ventricular Septal Defect for Teens


    Ventricular septal defect, or VSD, is a heart condition that a few teens can have. Find out what it is, how it happens, and what doctors do to correct it.

  • Truncus Arteriosus for Parents


    Truncus arteriosus is a heart defect that happens when a child is born with one large artery instead of two separate arteries.

  • Congenital Heart Defects for Parents


    Heart defects happen when there's a problem with a baby's heart development during pregnancy. Most heart defects can be treated during infancy.

  • Medical Tests & Procedures for Teens


    Learn about some common medical tests and procedures - how they work and why people need them - in these articles and videos for teens.

  • Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) for Parents


    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is a combination of problems caused by a birth defect that changes the way blood flows through the heart.

  • Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Surgery: The Fontan Procedure for Parents


    The Fontan procedure is open-heart surgery done as the third of three surgeries to treat hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS).

  • Pulmonary Stenosis for Parents


    Pulmonary stenosis means the pulmonary valve is too small, narrow, or stiff. Many people have no symptoms, but kids with more severe cases will need surgery so that blood flows properly through the body.

  • Words to Know (Heart Glossary) for Parents


    A guide to medical terms about the heart and circulatory system. In an easy A-Z format, find definitions on heart defects, heart conditions, treatments, and more.

  • Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) for Parents


    The foramen ovale is a normal opening between the upper two chambers of an unborn baby’s heart. It usually closes soon after the baby’s birth — when it doesn't, it's called a patent foramen ovale.

  • Interrupted Aortic Arch (IAA) for Parents


    An interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare heart condition in which the aorta doesn’t form completely. Surgery must be done within the first few days of a baby’s life to close the gap in the aorta.